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Old 5th May 2008, 05:18 PM   #11
Zoors is offline Zoors  Sweden
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Pafi:
"Do you know anything about ring modulators?"

Yes I do indeed.

However, I did not say there was a ringmodulator.
I did say there was a ringmodulator "effect", intension was to describe it so knowhow people would understand what I was rambelin about.

A ringmodulator is a devise that produces a sum and a difference signal from two input signals.

In this case the sum of 102kHz and 96 kHz is out of question.
You wont hear it.
But the difference 102-98 is significative.

I would agree on the idea that a diff > 20KHz would make it, BUT... it will make the whole setup unbalanced.

Ive been thinking of a post LPF, but I feel it must be unnecessary, ther must be an simpler solution.

I will try to find out what component network will make the final working frequency for the carrier, and try to adjust that.

Btw... The Q factor of a LC resnonance frequency is just the very resistance when the two components agree on letting the frequency pass =) In a LC LPF it will be about pass it to ground.

And, yes youre right, Pafi, it is 20uH the inductor is.
I have been dealing with old american schematics too long, where a mmfd is a pF. And a mF is a uF. =)

In this case the 100V 100kHz pwm square is feed thru a 20uH coil, a capacitor 4,7uF to ground, then on to the speaker coil, and the samt to the other end of the speaker coil, but with a second self contained pwm oscillator system.
Only shared system except the speaker, is the PSU.
And in idle theres no pumping what so ever.

Thanks for your thoughts about it, folks!
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Old 5th May 2008, 06:16 PM   #12
Pafi is offline Pafi  Hungary
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Quote:
A ringmodulator is a devise that produces a sum and a difference signal from two input signals.
Ring modulator is a special kind of modulator, it contains 4 diodes in a "ring" topology. For some odd reason some people call "ring modulator" every amplitude modulator, however they don't have any ring. But at the output there is no any kind of modulator either! A modulator needs strong nonlinearity, but filter and speaker are almost perfectly linear at this level and frequency. They surely won't demodulate carriers.

Nonlinear elements are in the amplifiers, so demodulation can be done there. This is not just a guess, it is proven by experience. (However it's strange for me that somebody doubt about it.)

Quote:
The Q factor of a LC resnonance frequency is just the very resistance when the two components agree on letting the frequency pass
Sorry, I don't know what is "LC resnonance frequency", "very resistance" and "agree on letting the frequency pass". Maybe it's because of I'm not a native english speaker.

I know only resistance, impedance, reactance, etc...

Quote:
Only shared system except the speaker, is the PSU.
Yes, intentionally it is. But unintentionally everything is connected to every other thing. Sometimes this coupling is too strong, and makes funny thing. But let this alone! Let's assume really the PSU is the only "shared system"! Does it mean that absolutely no coupling between amps? Not of course! PSU have impedance, wires have impadance, and speaker is a coupling too!

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And in idle theres no pumping what so ever.
Of course. So...?
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Old 5th May 2008, 07:38 PM   #13
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Is there a photo of the setup?
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Old 6th May 2008, 09:57 PM   #14
Eva is offline Eva  Spain
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The PWM comparators of each amplifier are the real demodulating element, and the leakage magnetic flux from output inductors is usually the offending signal that is being picked up in the PWM modulator of the opposite channel.

Input signal wiring may be also picking up the carrier of the other channel and resulting in intermodulation products if the signal is not properly filtered just before the modulator. Remember ground loops too.

If there is a problem with output filters, it's just the coil producing a too strong leakage flux.
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Old 9th May 2008, 02:14 PM   #15
Zoors is offline Zoors  Sweden
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"Ring modulators combine (or heterodyne) two waveforms, and output the sum and difference of the frequencies present in each waveform. "

Pafi - I dont really understand why you put down so much energy to prove something that is not at all relevant for this subject. It wont help the solution to to the problem at all.

LC Resonance

In the Class D amp output to speaker is a L (inductor coil) in series with the speaker, and in between them a large polypropylene capacitor (in this case 4.7uF) to ground.

In a balanced setup this LC pair is doubled, one on each pole of the speaker. As you understand there is some calculation to get this corner frequency to match, A. the feedback frquency of the carrier, B. the rolloff frequency in order to cancel the carrier at speaker coil.

Wjat I can see on my outputs, is that those carriers are of different frequencym 4kHZ diff, and, they are also on differént amplitudes. Menaing the LPFs (LC circuit) are not damping the carier with the same efficiency. Therefore you can say that they have differnet quality factors. Q value of a LC circuit is tha actual resistance at resonance. (ideally should be Q=zero)
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Old 9th May 2008, 02:28 PM   #16
Zoors is offline Zoors  Sweden
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Quote:
Originally posted by megajocke
Is there a photo of the setup?
Yes... one of the totally scrapped burnouts I have in a pile =)

You can see the large polyprop caps in dark orange between the relays and the coils. The smaller coild up north is actually transformers, the output current sense.


Click the image to open in full size.
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Old 9th May 2008, 02:31 PM   #17
Zoors is offline Zoors  Sweden
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Btw, how long is this moderation time, its really tough debating with this going on. Is there some regulations around it?

Edit: Wow.... in the same time I asked this with this post, it was gone.... Talk about synchronicity !
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Old 9th May 2008, 08:59 PM   #18
Pafi is offline Pafi  Hungary
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Quote:
Originally posted by Zoors


Pafi - I dont really understand why you put down so much energy to prove something that is not at all relevant for this subject.
I don't know why do you talk about irrelevant things! All I wanted to convince you about is this (ring modulator) is irrelevant (because no ring modulator there). So thank you, finally we agree!

I've already told you in my first post what can make interference. I can't do more while you don't want to talk about any relevant thing.

Quote:
It wont help the solution to to the problem at all.
If understanding don't help...

Quote:
LC Resonance

In the Class D amp output to speaker is a L (inductor coil) in series with the speaker, and in between them a large polypropylene capacitor (in this case 4.7uF) to ground.

In a balanced setup this LC pair is doubled, one on each pole of the speaker. As you understand there is some calculation to get this corner frequency to match, A. the feedback frquency of the carrier, B. the rolloff frequency in order to cancel the carrier at speaker coil.

Wjat I can see on my outputs, is that those carriers are of different frequencym 4kHZ diff, and, they are also on differént amplitudes. Menaing the LPFs (LC circuit) are not damping the carier with the same efficiency. Therefore you can say that they have differnet quality factors.
No. Quality factor can be measured or calculated at resonance freq, while switching freq is much higher. At that freq Q is irrelevant.

Quote:
Q value of a LC circuit is tha actual resistance at resonance. (ideally should be Q=zero)
Absolutely not. You've completely misunderstood. (Q is infinite in an ideal resonating circuit. But in a ClassD amp resonance is not a desired thing, ideal Q is 0.7...1. )

1.: There is serial and parallel LC circuit. Both of them has only 2 poles. The filter has 4 poles, so it is actually not an LC circuit. It's a network, it shows a parallel resonance for the output, but serial for the power stage.
2.: In a basic series L(R)C circuit the resistance is in series with the other elements. In a parallel L(R)C R is parallel.
3.: Q=R/(omega*L)=R*omega*C for parallel resonance, and Q=omega*L/R=1/(R*omega*C) for series resonance. At resonance freq both circuit have an impedance equal to R (not Q!), but for the filter there are 2 completely different R values depending on what do you analyze (impedance from output or impedance from power stage).

But as I said, the whole thing is irrelevant, because you don't have to do anything with resonance.

For building a good ClassD amp, having the basic knowledge of electrotechnics is not neccessary, but advisable IMHO. But you won't be able to learn it from forums and Wiki.
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Old 9th May 2008, 09:24 PM   #19
Zoors is offline Zoors  Sweden
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Default "Ringmodulator effect"

Pafi, Please stop confusing things by making them more complex than what they are. If I say "ring modulator effect" I mean a description of something that reminds us of a ringmodulator, mnamely the substraction of two frequencys, in my case 104000 Hz and 98000 Hz which gives me a measured, de facto, proven and recorded alien TONE of 4 kHZ in the output.

What does a differnece tone of 4000 Hz in output reminds YOU of, if you deal with two carriers that "collide" wher one is 104000 HZ and the other is 98000 Hz? Please give me a very short answer. What sort of effect does it remind you of?

You can probably propose 100's of different effects that you gert reminded of EXCEPT for the ringmodulator effect, but the sad thing is that I choosed just the ringmodulator effect, and I just did not know that you where allergic to ringmodulatoers, Pafi.

In the case of the subject howevever - I was right. It DOES remind us of a ring modulator effect. In deed.
Im sorry to say this, but if I change one of the carriers to 96000 Hz, the alien tone goes to 6oooHz... Just as a ringmodulator would do...

"Just like a ringmodulator effect".... Can it be more clear?
Please do not develop this thread on this sidestep.

Quote:
No. Quality factor can be measured or calculated at resonance freq, while switching freq is much higher. At that freq Q is irrelevant
´

Oh yes, you are so right, I am very flattered by having You as my main advisor. I am really impressed by your deep knowledge in this area.

Q factor will affect the damping steepness. It will affect the carrier amplitude (damping, db/octave) if it is damped by for example a tuned LC network.

I guess that is too simple for your highness understand.


Instead of helping me solving the problem, you just annoy me with all sorts of elitistic behaviour. What is your problem really?
Do you have to take everything apart and claim everybody around you is ignorant peasants and you are the light of the universer, or what? You just bugs up my time with a lot of complex irrelvant ramblings of totally simple facts. Please find another thread to infect.


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Old 9th May 2008, 10:36 PM   #20
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If you add or subtract two different tones you do not get a difference freqency component. However, if a nonlinearity is introduced then there will be a difference freqency. It can be seen as the amplitude envelope getting detected like in an AM-receiver. But without nonlinearity there will be no difference freqency component.
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