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Old 28th February 2007, 02:17 PM   #1
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Default No microcontroller for PGA2310?

Can a simple volume controller with PGA2310 do without programming a microcontroller?

I know nuts about programming but would like to build a volume controller to go with my Class-A Amp.

Can anyone provide me with a simple schematic of a 2-channel volume controller using a PGA2310? Hopefully no PICs or other chips that need programming needed. 3 push-buttons to control it; volume up, volume down and mute.

Thanks!

-Louis
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Old 28th February 2007, 02:32 PM   #2
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Have you looked at the data sheet?

A 3 wire controller is required to control the PGA2310.

You need a microcontroller.


Dallas Semiconductor makes some electronic pots that have built in controllers so all you need to connect are up and down buttons.

I_F
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Old 28th February 2007, 02:32 PM   #3
hacknet is offline hacknet  Singapore
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ive been trying to do it with logic updown sync counters into a multiplexer but i havent serious worked on it.
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Old 28th February 2007, 03:48 PM   #4
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yes, you can control it with a dual 8 bit DAC, a CMOS oscillator and a little bit of CMOS logic. you use a potentiometer and VCC as the input to the DAC, just make sure that VCC is quiet.
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Old 28th February 2007, 03:51 PM   #5
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You could probably do it with a rack full of vacuum tubes, too...

I_F
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Old 2nd March 2007, 07:48 AM   #6
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If you want to control volume without an mcu, then consider DS1802 and DS1666
or if your could solder a 48 pin TSSOP chip look at MAX5406
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Old 2nd March 2007, 08:57 AM   #7
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Have u read the thread
lightspeed attenuator ....in solid state

May be u should go for this. Simple and better.

Gajanan
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Old 4th March 2007, 01:56 AM   #8
Elkaid is offline Elkaid  Canada
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Quote:
Dallas Semiconductor makes some electronic pots that have built in controllers so all you need to connect are up and down buttons.
Yup, there's even leds output to indicate volume and balance


Good luck !
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Old 4th March 2007, 04:20 PM   #9
jaycee is offline jaycee  United Kingdom
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The amount of standard 7400 series logic you'd need to drive a PGA2310 makes it unfeasible. You;d have to have two 8 bit counters supporting increment and decrement, and some shift registers, and a clock.

I belive there was someone on DIYAudio that had made a simple kit that basically had an 8 pin PIC which connected to a potentiometer. This then drove a PGA2310/11. Try searching here. Thing is, a microcontroller is pretty much unavoidable.

edit: The kit i was thinking of was the Twisted Pear Kookaburra. Hardly simple, but it'll do the job
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Old 4th March 2007, 04:41 PM   #10
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You could probably do it with an FPGA. Lattice makes a few that have built in FLASH so the program self loads. They behave more like a CPLD. You may be abe to use a CPLD as well but the per gate cost on those tends to be much higher compared to FPGA's. Lattice aso has a free version of their software that you can use to develop the code. The programming cable, however, is not free. And the parts, through distribution, would also cost more than a small micro. And it is still a programming job. Instead of using C or assembler you would use Verilog, VHDL or ABEL.
So I am not sure if this is a cost effective solution, but it is a possible solution. In any case you would probably have similar expense and hurdles to deal with when using a micro. For a one off application the cost of the silicon itself is the least of your worries. BTW, I have no affiliation with Lattice. I just happen to think they are making some great CPLD's and some fairly innovative FPGA's these days. I've used these parts.

If you are a serious hobbyist, programmable logic opens up all kinds of other design doors for you. It wouldn't hurt to get your arms around this technology as a good learning exercise.
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