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Old 12th February 2009, 04:54 AM   #926
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Quote:
Originally posted by lanchile
I do not want to use led(I do not want to disturb the power supply)
How would a LED disturb the power supply?
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Old 12th February 2009, 12:24 PM   #927
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Quote:
Originally posted by pacificblue

How would a LED disturb the power supply?

That's what I was thinking..
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Old 12th February 2009, 05:18 PM   #928
sasmit is offline sasmit  India
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a paralell design....blue ones panasonic audio grade caps , two FC 1000ufs , wima 2.5 mm polypropylene, tyco 0.1% resistors.
work in progress...
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Old 12th February 2009, 05:20 PM   #929
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another angle..boards a bit dirty after soldering though..haven't cleaned yet
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Old 13th February 2009, 01:08 AM   #930
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it will drop some voltage down.not too much but it will.
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Old 13th February 2009, 03:13 AM   #931
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drop some voltage but where ? because of track length ? if u were talking about dirty soldering tat's because of the flux once it gets cleaned it'll be shiny.
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Old 13th February 2009, 04:46 AM   #932
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LED will not drop the voltage down, but it is a noisy device, so is not preferred.
It is discussed in one thread. U will have to search for it.

Gajanan Phadte
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Old 13th February 2009, 08:23 PM   #933
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So, how would a few nV/SQR(Hz) noise of a LED affect a power supply?
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Old 13th February 2009, 08:39 PM   #934
Dr_EM is offline Dr_EM  United Kingdom
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I am sure it can be considered negligible, especially with chipamps which typically have a high PSRR
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Old 13th February 2009, 11:43 PM   #935
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Default LED connection

Another method I've seen for connecting an LED as a power on indicator is to wrap about 25 turns of small gauge wire around the power transformer. Check the voltage and adjust the turns as needed to get below the LED Vforward rating. Connect this directly to the LED and you're done. I haven't tried this, but it sounds quite easy with an open torroid.

My LED is connected to the positive rail, and doesn't inject any noise that I can hear...
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Old 14th February 2009, 01:04 AM   #936
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" ... Check the voltage and adjust the turns as needed to get below the LED Vforward rating. Connect this directly to the LED and you're done. ..."

This could be quite thrilling if you don't have a voltmeter = checking the AC volts first of course ... a small value cap can protect the LED from the power up surge, a larger cap will make a nice 'fade away" light effect on power off. A daisy chain of diodes, in series, across the fashioned coil with the LED paralleling the last two in the chain will insure proper illumination without the need of regulation ... and to prevent the coil from heating to greatly, the length & number of the diode chain may be increased ...
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Old 14th February 2009, 03:21 AM   #937
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Quote:
[i]a small value cap can protect the LED from the power up surge, a larger cap will make a nice 'fade away" light effect on power off[/B]

Very true, I've noticed that my LED takes over a minute to go dark. A gentle reminder that bleeder resistors aren't a bad idea, burnt screwdriver tips and exploding caps being the not so gentle reminder... (I built my amp with a traditional power supply)
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Old 15th February 2009, 08:55 AM   #938
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Default Here's mine

I wanted to build a rugged, small, 30 to 50 watt amp for testing speakers and casual use. Beftus (post 860) and Matjans (post 32) povided the ideas. The schematic is Rod Elliott's
http://sound.westhost.com/project19.htm
and Mick Feuerbacher’s methodology & layout was used to build the circuits http://www.dogbreath.de/Chipamps/Gai...nCardCopy.html

This is a dual channel amp, completely contained in one case about 3" tall, 5 3/4" wide, and 8" long.

I consider myself unbelievably lucky, this amp makes zero noise. No hum, no thumps, ticks, or hiss. I have no sophisticated test gear, just an old used scope and a cheap signal generator, however, the amp's output changes less that a trace's thickness from 20 Hz to about 100 kHz. I'm really pleased with it
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Old 15th February 2009, 08:55 AM   #939
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Default Here's mine (2)

Nothing on the back but power entry with fuse and switch.
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Old 15th February 2009, 08:55 AM   #940
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Default Here's mine (3)

The power supply is a traditional filter bank (although necessarily small). It consists of four 4700 µF caps, 100 v, 35 bridge rectifier & an Antek 200 VA, 22-0-22 transformer. The white rectangles at top of the pic, to the right of the transformer are the loop breaker (Elliott's design) with another 1000V-35A bridge, 10Ů/5W resistor & 0.22 µF 275V MKT cap.
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Old 15th February 2009, 08:55 AM   #941
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Default Here's mine (4)

The chips are mounted to the top surface of the box. The IO wiring wasn't too bad, but things were definitely getting tight by the time I finished.

I found that implementing a complete circuit with input, feedback and output filters, plus mute switches really taxes the contraption (orderly structure?) you wind up constructing. Mick Feuerbacher’s minimalist chip amps look a lot better.
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Old 15th February 2009, 08:55 AM   #942
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Default Here's mine (5)

I was surprised by the results, good sound/no noise. In such a cramped space, I was expecting noise.

The input signal grounds are connected to the ground buss bar on each chip by a single strand from an 18 ga multi-strand wire. This separates the low level signal ground from the output/power ground by about a 0.01 Ů resistance.

A braided cable from the power supply to each chip consists of 18 ga V+, 18 ga V-, and 16 ga 0V wires.

The inputs go from the jacks to the pots, then the ground and wiper lines (black & white wires) go to the chip.

By the way, the box has 1/2" wide ribs on the top and bottom surfaces. I had to cut the ribs out of the way to mount the chips. Did you know you can machine aluminum with an end-cutting router bit and a small drill press? You can't do it well, but you can do it...
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Old 17th February 2009, 02:54 PM   #943
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this is my little gainclone
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Old 17th February 2009, 02:57 PM   #944
crt is offline crt  Indonesia
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inside
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Old 17th February 2009, 03:02 PM   #945
crt is offline crt  Indonesia
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and the processor
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Old 17th February 2009, 05:19 PM   #946
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CRT >>> He Da Man !!

A slick and resourceful way to build from what's available. In a word: "Healthy!"

(Check out the powder coating forums, here and elsewhere, if you need to make it look more "store bought" ... but I would keep it as is.)
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Old 18th February 2009, 02:29 AM   #947
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Default Replace switch!

Hello, I just replaced the toggle switch for a DP Rocker switch.
as you can see now the light is where the toggle switch was and the DP Rocker switch is where the light was (you can not see it well because the switch is black in rectangular hole). I think it looks nicer.and also I made small "holes" on top of the volume control to mark the volume and bigger ones for the input.
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Old 18th February 2009, 02:30 AM   #948
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The volume and input selector.
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Old 27th February 2009, 04:59 AM   #949
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Here is my first try at a gainclone. I used BrianGT's PS and amp boards and sourced my own components. The chassis was from a fried Haffler amp.
My first pass and I had no hum or other unwanted noise. DC offset is 0.1 mv in both channels. Sound is excellent and there is very little noise when sitting idle and gain is turned up on the preamp. I still have a little work to do with the cosmetics.
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Old 27th February 2009, 12:46 PM   #950
troystg is offline troystg  United States
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I don't know if you have enough heat sink...

Actually it is VERY well done. How does it sound?

Personally I would have rebuilt the Hafler.
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