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Old 28th April 2013, 07:19 PM   #2401
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put this into your woofer

Click the image to open in full size.

and hook it up to a pair of these to build your own mfb.

Click the image to open in full size.
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Old 29th April 2013, 12:41 PM   #2402
ippo is offline ippo  Sweden
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dfuhr7gm View Post
Ippo: Your chip looks ... erm ... damaged.
bute nice build, btw
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoIL4x4 View Post
If you are refering to the area around the lettering on the ic, I think it is a shadow and some stray thermal compound.....hopefully.
Yes that is correct some thermal compound on and on the side of the chip... I didn't clean it up after mounting it.
It's not damaged and plays nicely!

Though I'm trying to put a Truepath together now to compare.
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Old 8th May 2013, 12:58 PM   #2403
glenv6 is offline glenv6  United States
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Default My First Build

Hello! I just finished building one of the excellent Audiosector LM3875 kits by Peter Daniel. I was inspired by Peter's Patek design, so I borrowed heavily from that design for my amp.

The chassis is made from scrap aluminum heat sinks I found at a local electronic parts supplier and a couple of pieces of flat aluminum from Home Depot. I bought inexpensive Zebra wood turning blocks I found on the Internet for the end caps. Like Peter's Patek design, I drilled my wood blocks to fit over the capacitors to keep the footprint small. All I have to do to complete my project is to build a case for the external power supply...

The result is a cool looking amp that sounds great and runs cool!
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Old 25th May 2013, 06:51 PM   #2404
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Hi Guys,

I have recently finished my LM3886 chipamp using Brian GT boards. It's a standard build in a surplus equipment case. The heat sink is also a surplus purchase for 0.50! Originally I was going to build the amp as dual mono but then found the case which isn't big enough for two transformers. I'm not sure about the front panel which is 0.3mm carbon fibre/kevlar sheet over the original front which has lots of unwanted holes in it. The blue LED power indicator shines through the sheet. I may still get a front panel made by Schaeffer AG.

I'm happy with the sound and the heat sink gets hardly warm.

Tony
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Old 26th May 2013, 07:49 AM   #2405
AndrewT is online now AndrewT  Scotland
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The Kevlar/Carbon has a snazzy look.
You have made good use of twisting.

Clean the top and bottom joints of the chassis so that they become electrically conducting. A non conducting seem/gap lets in RF. I'm still reading H.Ott.

Do you have Thermal compound in the sink to chassis interface?
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Old 26th May 2013, 09:44 AM   #2406
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Hi Andrew,

The back of the heat sink was checked for flatness with engineers blue and fine wet and dry on a thick piece of plate glass. The same with the back panel. The two were then pulled together with 16 cs M4 screws with thermal paste between. There couldn't be a more intimate thermal contact between the two. At the planning stage I did think about cutting a hole in the panel so that the devices bolted directly onto the heat sink but decided not to. Note also the aluminium strip under the heads of the bolts securing the packages which I believe allows higher torqueing of the fixing bolts and thus improves the thermal interface between the packages and the panel.

Tony
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Old 27th May 2013, 05:12 PM   #2407
frank1 is offline frank1  United Kingdom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by levistubby View Post
Hi Andrew,

The back of the heat sink was checked for flatness with engineers blue and fine wet and dry on a thick piece of plate glass.
Nice to know I'm not the only one who does this...
Heatsinks are never "flat" except for those nice ground surfaces from Conrad Heatsinks in Aus.
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Old 27th May 2013, 10:33 PM   #2408
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Levies tubby: neat looking build.
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Old 28th May 2013, 04:36 PM   #2409
Mihkus is offline Mihkus  Estonia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhouston View Post
Levies tubby: neat looking build.
Theres like one pic per page, too much talk.
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Old 29th May 2013, 08:30 PM   #2410
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glenv6 View Post
Hello! I just finished building one of the excellent Audiosector LM3875 kits by Peter Daniel. I was inspired by Peter's Patek design, so I borrowed heavily from that design for my amp.

The chassis is made from scrap aluminum heat sinks I found at a local electronic parts supplier and a couple of pieces of flat aluminum from Home Depot. I bought inexpensive Zebra wood turning blocks I found on the Internet for the end caps. Like Peter's Patek design, I drilled my wood blocks to fit over the capacitors to keep the footprint small. All I have to do to complete my project is to build a case for the external power supply...

The result is a cool looking amp that sounds great and runs cool!
Nice amp! I would change those 10uf capacitors in the power supply for at least 6800uf. I build those kits long time ago and I try many caps in the power supply and I found that those 10uf caps are JOKES!!! When I changed them to 10000uf I got a huge improvement in the sound (bass). just give it a try.
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