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Old 27th April 2005, 03:03 PM   #11
Nuuk is offline Nuuk  United Kingdom
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Quote:
Well maybe you have a point there nuuk but aluminium is a rather "dead" material, not that sensitive to vibrations.
But it's not the aluminium making the music!
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Old 27th April 2005, 03:43 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally posted by Nuuk


If he joins the chip to that flimsy piece of aluminium base, it is going to pick up all the vibration. Adding something more substantial will help minimise microphony and 'take away' the heat.
The aluminum is pretty solid, and is attached to the case pretty rigidly in six places. I am not sure I understand why there would be more microphonics from the bottom of the case than from heatsinks attached to the bottom of the case.

The case itself does have rubber half-sphere feet, so hopefully that will reduce transmission of vibration from the shelf to the chassis.

Additionally, I have a sheet of copper. I was thinking I might attach the chips to the copper with HS compound, then attach the copper to the aluminum with the same compound. I can bend a bit of the copper up to provide a big fin while also effectively increading the thickness (and heat transfer rate) where the chips are attached. Perhaps the biggest benefit of this is that the big fin should provide a RF shield between the chips and the PS.

-d
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Old 28th April 2005, 03:01 AM   #13
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Do these chips actually experience microphonics? I can;t image how, as their are no parts inside really to move about, like in a tube. Have these been heard or seen, like on a scope?
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Old 28th April 2005, 03:13 AM   #14
Stocker is offline Stocker  United States
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That can be a bit of a hotly debated subject in "audiophile" circles... Some will say that they definately do. These are likely to be the same folks who will tell you what a tremendous difference the new feet on their amplifiers made, or the power cord etc. There is apparently a LOT of money to be made on such upgrades and a LOT of people who can (or think they can) hear the effect of, say, a different *style* of brass spike-foot for their speakers.

Anyhow, MY speakers (or ears) apparently are lacking but I have a different opinion. If you hear microphonics, try to get rid of them. I don't (yet, perhaps).
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Old 28th April 2005, 03:24 AM   #15
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I know this can be debated, but it seems pretty simple to test crudely. Hook a chipamp up to a scope and wack it. See anything on the scope? If I had a scope I would try it out.
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Old 28th April 2005, 03:35 AM   #16
sam9 is offline sam9  United States
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Since this a DIY forum, may I suggest the obvious answer to the original post -- try it and see what happens. Ditto the microphony question. If it works, bravo! If not, try something else.

When you get opinions as varied as you have here, the only way to resolve it, is haul your behind away from the PC and go build something.


More to the point, whether the plate will be adequate heatsinking depends in part on how much current power you will run through the chips, which in turn depends on the power supply and your listening habits.
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Old 28th April 2005, 03:48 AM   #17
paulb is offline paulb  Canada
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I'm running a P3A amp from a 18-0-18 V transformer and the heatsinks barely get above room temperature. The plate by itself should be fine. Give it a shot. The chips should shut down if they get over temperature.
"SPiKe protection means that these parts are completely safeguarded at the output against overvoltage, undervoltage, overloads, caused by shorts to the supplies, thermal runaway, and instantaneous temperature peaks."
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Old 28th April 2005, 04:01 AM   #18
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Default For minimal heatsinking, look here..

Click the image to open in full size.

More pics available here

This is the amp I use for my workbench. It's classic BrianGT LM3875 stuff. Power supply is a 2 x 16V toroid. The speakers I use are labelled as being 4 ohms. I never really cramp the amp up to full power as it's in a small room, and I'm usually pretty close to the speakers. Even when I set the volume to "shower mode" (the bathroom's in the next room) the bottom plate of the amp rarely feels more than warm to the touch. I'm sure I could activate the thermal protection if I really tried, but I'd probably need a 4 ohm dummy load to do it, otherwise it would be just TOO loud.

In summary, I think it depends on the size of your room, your speakers impedance and sensitivity, and your preferred listening level. Looks like you've got more heatsink than me though!

Steve
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Old 28th April 2005, 06:41 AM   #19
ROVSING is offline ROVSING  Denmark
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Quote:
But it's not the aluminium making the music!
Why should the aluminium disturbe the sound then ?
Actually 2,25 mm alu isn't that flimsy with those measures.
Quote:
Additionally, I have a sheet of copper. I was thinking I might attach the chips to the copper with HS compound, then attach the copper to the aluminum with the same compound. I can bend a bit of the copper up to provide a big fin
This will make it better, copper leads the heat from the source 2 times faster than alu paint it black and dissipation will be even better, but still i don,t think that it is necessary.
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Old 28th April 2005, 11:36 AM   #20
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Yes, to the point, I appologize. I, as well, think the aluminum plate should be fine. If it does get really hot, it could be oscillations in the amp. Otherwise, it should be fine.
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