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Old 23rd March 2005, 08:26 AM   #1
illum is offline illum  Pakistan
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Default Need an Op amp which can take a 60V - 140 V input

Hi
I really need help on this thing. i need and opamp that will not burn or get spoiled by giving it a high voltage input. like 60 to 140 v input.

plz reply asap my project is stuck on this part.
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Old 23rd March 2005, 09:39 AM   #2
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Why does it need to be so high?
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Old 23rd March 2005, 09:54 AM   #3
bocka is offline bocka  Germany
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The OPA445 has a power suplly range from +/- 10V to +/-45 V. Maybe that part fits in your project. Sometimes it's better to use a voltage divider on the input or an difference amplifier like the INA117. Both devices are from TI.
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Old 23rd March 2005, 11:06 AM   #4
paulb is offline paulb  Canada
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This company has them. They're expensive.
http://eportal.apexmicrotech.com/mainsite/index.asp
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Old 23rd March 2005, 11:16 AM   #5
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60-140 V in but what about out? The same as a LM3886 can deliver or more?

What about a voltage divider at the input? Is this enough?

Can you please describe more what your goal is? I think it's pretty easy to solve.

One solution is this
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Old 23rd March 2005, 01:03 PM   #6
illum is offline illum  Pakistan
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basically i need something that will amplify a signal less then 15V and reduce the voltage of signal with voltage more then 40V
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Old 23rd March 2005, 01:08 PM   #7
macboy is offline macboy  Canada
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Quote:
Hi
I really need help on this thing. i need and opamp that will not burn or get spoiled by giving it a high voltage input. like 60 to 140 v input.
Everyone seems to be assuming that you mean 60 to 140 V power supply. But you said input. So I will assume that you really meant input.

What you need to do is use a voltage divider before the input of the opamp. A 10:1 divider will reduce the voltage to 6 to 14 V which is within the range of most opamps. Your power supply should be a few more volts than the maximum input voltage. Of course, your output voltage will also be limited by the power supply voltage, but since you didn't mention a specific required voltage, we can only assume that you don't need anything special.
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Old 23rd March 2005, 01:19 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally posted by peranders
One solution is this
Dear PerAnders,

Me thinks Mark Alexander's IGBT amplifier is not a pretty easy solution.
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Old 23rd March 2005, 01:25 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally posted by illum
basically i need something that will amplify a signal less then 15V and reduce the voltage of signal with voltage more then 40V
What kind of input is it and what is the load (output), how much power?
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Old 23rd March 2005, 01:34 PM   #10
illum is offline illum  Pakistan
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it basically is a telephone signal. when simple voice is transmitted the voltage is low but when a ring signal is suppose to be passed the voltage is between 40 - 160. so i need to reduce this voltage with out disrupting the normal voice signals.
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