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Chip Amps Amplifiers based on integrated circuits

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Old 8th December 2004, 12:36 PM   #21
ROVSING is offline ROVSING  Denmark
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Actually if you take a piece of alu and a piece of copper with identical measures, the dissipation will be exactly the same, but copper will lead the heat faster away from the heat source to dissipation.
Painting it black will make the dissipation better in both cases.
So Vikash you are right about copper conducting better.
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Old 8th December 2004, 02:49 PM   #22
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Default heattransfer

As Daniel pointed out: Surface (exposed to (free) flowing air) is the key factor in getting rid of the heat. In view of the free exposure copper will do better in the Peter Daniel design, where as far as I can see only the backside is freely exposed.

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Old 8th December 2004, 03:11 PM   #23
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I'm using perforated aluminum top panel, and this dissipates most of heat in Patek design.

With the integrated chassis, the copper piece is connected to rear panel (which surface by itself is big enough), but it also connects to the mid plate, which in turn is connected to the top panel.

In any case, GC generates very little heat, and dissipating it shouldn't be a problem in most designs.
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Old 8th December 2004, 03:13 PM   #24
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As to the computer cables, I'm not sure how much current they can take, but if you put them in parallel (per rail), chances are they will work.
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Old 8th December 2004, 04:13 PM   #25
BrianGT is offline BrianGT  United States
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Vikash,

Looks nice!

What does your power supply chassis look like?

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Old 8th December 2004, 04:37 PM   #26
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Temperature transfer of copper ( against aluminium ) is similar as electricel conductivity - difference is a few percent .
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Old 8th December 2004, 06:48 PM   #27
Vikash is offline Vikash  United Kingdom
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Quote:
Originally posted by BrianGT
Vikash,

Looks nice!

What does your power supply chassis look like?

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More transparent than the amp. So much so that you can't see any of it

I'll start on it soon hopefully, and want it to be a simple dark block for the amp to sit on.
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Old 8th December 2004, 06:57 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally posted by Peter Daniel
Heatsinks are definitely fine, maybe even too big
Guestimating from their size the "Therminator" says that C/W=2.1 which is just dandy for ambient air flow.
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Old 10th December 2004, 08:44 AM   #29
XELB is offline XELB  Portugal
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Nice work

I Like the ideia.... small, simple and we can say original

When you finish, tell us about the sound quality
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Old 10th December 2004, 10:56 PM   #30
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Vikash,

Your amp is very well done. From your attention to your own site and others you have designed, I can tell you are a designer with a keen eye.

I hope to see more of what you are doing, as it is very well thought out and is much more of a success than most comercial designs I see.

Thank you,

Sandy.
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