Gainclone Connectors (split from electrical safety) - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Chip Amps

Chip Amps Amplifiers based on integrated circuits

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 27th September 2004, 08:12 PM   #1
OliverD is offline OliverD  Germany
diyAudio Member
 
OliverD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Germany
Neutrik Speakon connectors are insulated and mechanically rugged. Also the contact resistance is quite low compared to other solutions
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th September 2004, 08:15 PM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
Peter Daniel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Toronto, Canada
Send a message via AIM to Peter Daniel
IMO, Cardas patented posts are probably one of the better posts available presently. They might not look the best, and only work with spades, but certain properties are hard to match by other designs.

I'm not sure if that qualifies for completely insulated, but I suspect North American regulations are not as strict in that matter as European.

Jeff Rowland is using them extensively.

Click the image to open in full size.
__________________
www.audiosector.com
“Do something really well. See how much time it takes. It might be a product, a work of art, who knows? Then give it away cheaply, just because you feel that it should not cost so much, even if it took a lot of time and expensive materials to make it.” - JC
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th September 2004, 09:27 PM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Prague,Czech Republic
To Peter : " ... you take away fun ... " - how do you mean this ? And wrong direction ? Here you have thruth, 'cos here is showed " instead solutions " of output terminals - cheap trash. High quality ones are made for industry or military using, but have one disadvantage : they are not cheap. Industry binding posts are different to " pseudohighend " and some manufacturers are using this - look for example at ML, Krell or Burmester, where you can see it. By the way, how do you recognize realy high quality binding post ?
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th September 2004, 09:34 PM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
Peter Daniel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Toronto, Canada
Send a message via AIM to Peter Daniel
Quote:
Originally posted by Upupa Epops
By the way, how do you recognize realy high quality binding post ?
In binding posts, I like the minimum amount of metal, good contact area and no force on conducting parts.

Cardas patented posts provide all that. All other posts look only fancy by comparison.
__________________
www.audiosector.com
“Do something really well. See how much time it takes. It might be a product, a work of art, who knows? Then give it away cheaply, just because you feel that it should not cost so much, even if it took a lot of time and expensive materials to make it.” - JC
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th September 2004, 09:40 PM   #5
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
Quote:
Originally posted by Mr Evil
And they make a very satisfying *click*
Talking about *click* (sorry, OT), I found some very nice mini XLR plugs (chassis mount male and cable female), that make a very good PSU connection for preamps, phono stages, Dacs, etc.
They also make a very positive click.
Like these ones:
http://www.cybermarket.co.uk/ishop/923/shopscr2031.html

Small and beautiful.
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th September 2004, 09:55 PM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Prague,Czech Republic
To Peter : How you can to get good contact with minimum amount of metal and no force on conducting parts ? Look at binding post for welding machine - they are robust, big and have fine turns with small tolerances ( not such as brass high end trash ones ).
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th September 2004, 10:03 PM   #7
diyAudio Member
 
Peter Daniel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Toronto, Canada
Send a message via AIM to Peter Daniel
Quote:
Originally posted by Upupa Epops
To Peter : How you can to get good contact with minimum amount of metal and no force on conducting parts ? Look at binding post for welding machine - they are robust, big and have fine turns with small tolerances ( not such as brass high end trash ones ).
I said a minimum amount of metal, I didn't say in contact area. As you look closely at Cardas patented posts, you'll notice that all metal they use is actually only in the contact area, nothing else. Also, those metal parts are not affected by pulling/stretching forces (from a nut) as the nut only proveds pressure to bring both contact areas close together, but none of the conducting elements is affected by the pulling force (as it's usually the case with other designs).

Of course those posts are not good for welding machines, but for average power amps they are more than enough.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg c1.jpg (89.7 KB, 154 views)
__________________
www.audiosector.com
“Do something really well. See how much time it takes. It might be a product, a work of art, who knows? Then give it away cheaply, just because you feel that it should not cost so much, even if it took a lot of time and expensive materials to make it.” - JC
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th September 2004, 10:22 PM   #8
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Prague,Czech Republic
I don't know, what is claim of this solution, maybe that force to both contact is logical the same and you have sure thruth, that contact are only pushed, not screwed, but change welder contacts again and again after welding ?
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th September 2004, 11:05 PM   #9
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
Quote:
Originally posted by Peter Daniel
That's what I was actually curious about: are those patented posts OK with strict European regulations, where no exposed parts of posts to be present?
Maby more OK than welding machine binding posts.


Are we gonna use car battery terminals on audio amps?

Let's talk about audio.
I sure prefer Neutrik RCA plugs than some heavy-metal "high-end" ones that populate around.
Kimber RCA plugs are good too.
But some people buy what looks impressive, substantial, like a Buick.
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th September 2004, 11:20 PM   #10
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Brazil
Quote:
Originally posted by carlosfm


Talking about *click* (sorry, OT), I found some very nice mini XLR plugs (chassis mount male and cable female), that make a very good PSU connection for preamps, phono stages, Dacs, etc.
They also make a very positive click.
Like these ones:
http://www.cybermarket.co.uk/ishop/923/shopscr2031.html

Small and beautiful.
They certainly are small and beautiful, but not so good for hi-end audio applications.

All the connectors in my Lectrosonics radio microphones use mini-XLR types, which are better than others (Lemo) but not as good as they could be. Dealing with them for more than 10 years, let me tell you that they are really a pain.

1) Materials used are not that good. No teflon dielectric, no silver or gold plate on contacts. It's all nickel-plated brass.

2) Construction puts the terminals quite close to each other, which makes soldering quite difficult.

3) You can only use thin cables with them, as the cable clamp is small. Very much like 1/8"jacks.

4) The unlock button sometimes does not unlock the connector as it should.

As I said: in my application is fine, because it improves on the Lemo and 1/8" connectors. But if you have space, which we usually have, and want a good locking connector, use a regular XLR. For the money there's no better locking connector.




Carlos
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Australian Electrical Safety Standards Cloth Ears Solid State 13 31st October 2006 12:11 PM
Gainclone electrical safety Franz G Chip Amps 112 13th November 2004 10:11 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 02:16 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2