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Old 19th May 2004, 04:54 AM   #1
hams is offline hams  United States
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Question 12 volt trigger

Has anyone ever implemented a circuit to turn on an Amp when you get a 12 volt signal from a reciever/processor?

I'm thinking of having a tri-state switch that has an "On" state which ignores the 12 volt signal, an "Off" state to turn off power completely and a "Standby" state that would switch the amp on when the 12 volt signal is detected.

Here's a conceptual drawing to help explain. I don't know how to draw a proper circuit diagram, this is just a high level idea....
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Old 19th May 2004, 12:50 PM   #2
Nuuk is offline Nuuk  United Kingdom
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Could you adapt this ?
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Old 20th May 2004, 01:08 AM   #3
hams is offline hams  United States
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Default maybe

i was hoping for something already purpose built. i don't know too much about circuits, so i'm not sure that i could modify that plan...
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Old 20th May 2004, 05:25 AM   #4
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The switch Drawing has a big problem.
All of the outputs are tied together.
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Old 20th May 2004, 12:51 PM   #5
dhenryp is offline dhenryp  United States
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I've built a very simple circuit that has worked without a problem for 8 months now. I got a 12V DC 1 amp wall wart and plugged it into the switched AC outlet of my receiver. I used this 12V output to control a 12 V relay with a 30A (@>120 AC Volts) contacts. I use the relay contacts to switch the AC to several components, among them a 1200 Watt Crown Pro Amp. I bought the wall wart and relay from All Electronics for less than $10.
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Old 20th May 2004, 02:28 PM   #6
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This is how I plan to do it: in every amp/active crossover/whatever I create, I will put this circuit:
Click the image to open in full size.

If the amp/... has a power button, it will be connected to one of the enable inputs. On the back I'll have 2 trigger connectors (probably a serial connector), one input and one output. The output pins are directly connected to the pins on the input connector.

The triggers (8 of them, 1 ground => serial connector) will be controlled by a relay driver in my preamp. The driver is capable of sourcing 200mA per trigger line.

In the amp/... one of the input pins is connected to one of the enable pins of the above circuit. If you have more than 8 things you want to remotely control, you can always use logic gates etc. to have more possible "control codes".

The only drawback I see to this is that you need an appropriate voltage in the amp/.... If you don't want to use the device's power supply for this, you'll have to add a small separate supply. A 78xx & a small transformer is pretty small, so that shouldn't be too much of a problem.

*Oh btw, if you want tri state with this circuit simple put a 240V switch in series with the AC input. You can then mount it on the back next to the AC connector. Then you'll have your: always off, always on (with another, simple switch on the front) & on on trigger signal.
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Old 20th May 2004, 10:36 PM   #7
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Why not put a short delay into the circuit as well. This will reduce popping in the speakers from the relay kicking in.
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Old 21st May 2004, 03:44 AM   #8
hams is offline hams  United States
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Default need explanation

Can some explain what the following parts from the suggested schematic:

1N4148
1N4004
BC547

Are the "En Signals" the trigger signals?

thanks.
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Old 21st May 2004, 09:11 AM   #9
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Default Re: need explanation

Quote:
Originally posted by hams
Can some explain what the following parts from the suggested schematic:

1N4148
1N4004
BC547

Are the "En Signals" the trigger signals?

thanks.
The "En Signals" are indeed the trigger signals.

The 1N4148, 1N4004 & BC547 are about the most general available diodes & NPN transistor you can find, in Europe that is. If you can't find them replace as follows:
1N4148: general low current diode (can easily fit in 5mm footprint)
1N4004: general diode (1A 100V) (fits just into a 7.5mm spaced footprint)
BC547: general NPN transistor

If you're not sure with what to replace, here are the datasheet to give you a general idea. They are from OnSemi (Motorola). As these are general parts, the characteristics should be the same no matter what brand you have.
BC547: datasheet
1N4148: datasheet
1N4004: datasheet

Know that I haven't tested this circuit yet! I'll probably will do so today. Note that the BC547 can only source 100mA continuously. If you're going to use a low voltage relay (eg. 6V) you might need to use another transistor, one that can source more current.
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Old 21st May 2004, 12:42 PM   #10
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Here is another Schematic that does the same thing.
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