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TA2024 on regulated 13.8V?
TA2024 on regulated 13.8V?
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Old 10th January 2018, 02:51 PM   #1
KanedaK is offline KanedaK  Belgium
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Default TA2024 on regulated 13.8V?

I read confusing data concerning TA2024 (used in a Trends TA10.1 amp).

Datasheets specs 13.2V as max usable input voltage and 16V as absolute maximum (voltage were damage occurs).

I have this nice linear regulated 13.8V PSU I would have love to use it with my Trends amp.

I see other T-amps (using TA2020 chip) being used on 13.8V and a few forums were 13.8V was considered OK for TA2024 as well. But it may be just confusion - or ignorance- from the contributors. it's easy to consider all t-amps are the same and forget there's TA2020 and TA2024.

So to make it shorter: can TA2024 be used long term on 13.8V (provided it's well regulated)?
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Old 10th January 2018, 02:55 PM   #2
globalplayer is offline globalplayer  Germany
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According to the datasheet:
8.5v min
12v typ.
13.2v max
16v absolute maximum
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Old 10th January 2018, 03:09 PM   #3
forestsgump is offline forestsgump
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Quote:
Originally Posted by globalplayer View Post
According to the datasheet:
8.5v min
12v typ.
13.2v max
16v absolute maximum

Whoever is the datasheet author ... isnt thinking much about how to make the understanding an easier task.

Last edited by forestsgump; 10th January 2018 at 03:12 PM.
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Old 10th January 2018, 08:10 PM   #4
globalplayer is offline globalplayer  Germany
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I`d say 13.8v won`t be that much of a problem.
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Old 11th January 2018, 09:50 AM   #5
globalplayer is offline globalplayer  Germany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JonSnell Electronic View Post
Why post again?
Balanced inputs?
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Old 11th January 2018, 10:45 AM   #6
KanedaK is offline KanedaK  Belgium
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Quote:
Originally Posted by globalplayer View Post
I`d say 13.8v won`t be that much of a problem.
Thanks for moving my post in the correct forum

I would think too that 13.8V shouldn't be too much of a problem but I like to sleep on my both ears and have my little modded Trends amp - wich is part of my main bi-amped system, driving the midange and treble horns- last as long as possible.

I opened the regulated 13.8V PSU and it seems (maybe someone can confirm?) that I can actually dial the output DC voltage from a little pot on the regulator board. If someone can confirm to me that it is the case, and I just need to turn it until I reach the needed voltage (I would lower it to 13.2V in this case, just to be safe), it would be great. Here's a picture of the "pot":
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Old 13th January 2018, 12:25 AM   #7
FauxFrench is offline FauxFrench  France
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Yes, it is a bit confusing. The issue involves voltage stress, thermal stress, reliability and liability towards customers.

The absolute maximum voltage (non operational) is an indication of the point where voltage stress may harm the IC. The voltage may temporarily get up to this level but thermally it is not safe operation and your long term reliability would be affected if used more permanently.

Maximum operation voltage indicates, to my understanding, the voltage below which thermal stress and long term reliability should be safe. ICs are produced with a spread in parameters and the absolute majority should be able to handle this supply voltage for long.

The typical operation voltage seems to be a hint to the less cognitive designers what kind of supply voltage to use such that both they and the chip manufacturer have good operational margins and good reliability.

The minimum operational voltage seems to be the voltage below which there is no guarantee for how the IC performs. It is one of these "on your own risk" limits.

Liability (legal) towards your customers is an important issue when components are sold and used in such large numbers. Imagine that you have been too optimistic in your specifications and sold say 1 million ICs and now your customers come back and inform you that they have a very high return rate for their electronic products and the reason for the high failure rate seems to be your IC. You will have a huge problem on your hand. Therefore, you want to specify absolutely safe limits in order to avoid serious liability claims.

For us DIY designers, it means that we can often go above the stated limits because the manufacturers have included quite some margins. Unless you, due to the spread in parameters, have received a poor specimen you can take it further than specified. If you are unfortunate, you will as a maximum loose your single item.

Another question is how much you gain by going above the stated limits. 13.8V instead of 13.2V will give only a marginal increase in output power in exchange for a reduced reliability.

You can with a high probability operate your TA2024 at 13.8V and it will work for years. But, it seems that the small trim-potentiometer allows you to adjust the output voltage down to 13.2V and you will hardly notice any loss in performance. I would stay below the operational maximum limit.

Do the adjustment with a dummy load.

Last edited by FauxFrench; 13th January 2018 at 12:32 AM.
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Old 13th January 2018, 09:30 AM   #8
KanedaK is offline KanedaK  Belgium
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Yes that's how I felt those ratings were. Thanks for clarifying I will lower the output to 13,2V.
13,8V was never a goal, I just happened to have a 13,8V psu, I don't need extra power from the amp, it's driving mid/high horns in an active bi-amped configuration. I already have limitless headroom (in a domestic environment, that is), I just feel a decent linear PSU would give me cleaner power - and maybe I would gain a little bit in smoothness and detail?...

Anyways, yesterday the PSU blowed its fuse - replaced it, still blowing the fuse when I turn it on. Haven't connected anything to it yet :/ I will replace the diodes, and if it doesn't fix it, I'll just buy a new one.
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