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Old 26th April 2015, 11:18 PM   #1
han aji is offline han aji  Indonesia
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Default wiring 5 amp to single stereo input

hi i want to build an amplifier for high pass, mid, and subwoofer for single input stereo. should i use preamp? if yes it should be 2 preamps right? or more?

how i wire the amp to the preamp? should i parallel it? like in the right preamp, i have juction that go to each amp (go to filter first then amp)? or i have 3 preamp for each section? if so am i should wire the stereo input from computer to be parallel or there is another way?.

i've search on google but i cannot find the "correct" instruction on google the exact tutorial. thanks

Regard, Aji
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Old 27th April 2015, 05:43 AM   #2
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Research "bi-amp."

From the tone of your questions, it sounds like you have a whole lot to learn before you could even get a commercial bi-am setup to work, let alone build one.
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Old 27th April 2015, 06:00 AM   #3
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First lesson : the "one" contains "the two"

as in one plug, classic mini head phone type mini-jack, there are three
contacts, one is common ground (sleeve) and the two are left (tip) channel and the right channel is the [ring of the plug]

Phone connector (audio) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In a 2 channel and 1 subwoofer system, namely 2.1, after the plug the two channels get summed ( mixed) in one channel, then with the aid of electronics, the signal get low frequency- passed ( processed ).

Same process happens to any speaker since those are going to be incorporated into a system, when the design asks for this
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Old 27th April 2015, 09:28 AM   #4
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
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the "phone connector" is a corruption of telephone from way back.
It is commonly known as TRS now, trs stands for tip, ring, sleeve.

it comes in three common sizes. 2.5mm, 3.5mm and "

But it has a big drawback. During insertion and removal, some of the poles short together
This is not a problem for a passive source, like a microphone. This could destroy an active output stage.
A three pin plug and socket is better. vhs, keyboard and mouse have a small multipin plug and socket, DIN have a bigger 3pin plug and socket
XLR are available in standard size, getting very big and a smaller size, still a bit big.

ESP has a few very good articles on active systems and bi-amping.
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Last edited by AndrewT; 27th April 2015 at 09:31 AM.
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Old 27th April 2015, 12:15 PM   #5
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.
It seems you're talking about running 3 separate amps, one amp for tweeters, one amp for midrange, and one amp for bass.

Then you're talking about 3 entirely separate systems, the only common factor being the input. The sequence would be:

Highs: audio source ~> high pass filter ~> preamp ~> amp ~> tweeter(s)

Mids: same audio source ~> band pass filter ~> preamp ~> amp ~> midrange(s)

Lows: same audio source ~> low pass filter ~> preamp ~> amp ~> woofer(s)

All of which is a pretty complicated setup. Unless you're running pretty expensive speakers I question whether you'll get a return on your effort and expense. You might be better off with a simpler, single 20-watt amp. You might be interested in the "Typical Applications" circuit on page 2 of the LM1875 data sheet, which is here: http://www.ti.com/lit/gpn/lm1875

Also I'm posting the below illustration, which might be of interest.

Explanation:

In audio the ruling concept is "line level." It rules in the sense that preamps, mixers, and similar are expected to have a line level output, and amplifiers develop their full rated wattage with a line level input.

Unfortunately, in these multinational times there are several definitions of line level. However, you won't go far wrong by using the classic definition of line level = nominal one volt.

"Nominal" means approximately. Line level has to be an approximate figure because audio voltages actually vary all the time, to produce very soft or very loud audio at the speakers or headphones. But there has to be some kind of planning figure, and "line level" is it.

It's worth noting that usually headphone jacks work at about line level. Nearly always headphone jacks can be used as line-out jacks, which connect to line-in jacks.

It's also worth noting that audio sources such as CD players, Blu-Ray players, TV sets and similar usually have an output voltage close to line level, and don't need a preamp before they're connected to an amplifier. But the only way to be certain of this is to look at the manufacture's specs, or to just connect the device and see how well it works.

Because most audio sources output something close to line level, preamps and mixers usually don't have much gain. They might have a gain of around 5 (14 dB), intended to just bring various unknown inputs up to the required line level output to run the amplifier or other devices.

(Amplifiers might have a gain of around 20, which is about 26 dB.)
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Old 27th April 2015, 03:54 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AndrewT View Post
ESP has a few very good articles on active systems and bi-amping.
Best advice yet.

BiAmp (Bi-Amplification - Not Quite Magic, But Close) - Part 1

BiAmp (Bi-Amplification - Not Quite Magic, But Close) - Part 2
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Old 27th April 2015, 10:53 PM   #7
han aji is offline han aji  Indonesia
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so do you mean that if i'm summed the bass in 2.1 channel, its mean that audio system was bi amp? or 2.1 itself was bi amp?
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Old 28th April 2015, 06:43 AM   #8
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
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Han,
Bi-amp means two quite different topologies.

In the UK, at least, Bi-amping means to use TWO amplifiers to drive the TWO sets of terminals on the back of a two way crossover type speaker.

In the US, bi-amping is used to mean "active speakers". where two amplifiers are preceded with a pair of filters and the two, filtered and amplified, outputs are fed to separate (no crossover) low frequency and high frequency drivers.

2.1 has nothing to do with bi-amping in either of it's forms.

2.1 is two separate audio channels (stereo) with a shared (mono) part frequency range channel for the bass only, i.e. it is three channels of audio.

If you want to use three amplifiers to drive three different frequency drivers, then you are proposing an active speaker system. That will give you ONE channel of Audio. If you need stereo you will need six amplifiers for the six speaker drivers.
Do some research and make sure you understand what you are proposing.

Then you can ask about how you get audio signals into your active speaker system.
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Last edited by AndrewT; 28th April 2015 at 06:49 AM.
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Old 28th April 2015, 09:26 PM   #9
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really odd.
here bi-amping means 2 amplifier drives the same speaker (they are in parallel)
bi-wiring with 2 amplifiers is when every apmlifier drives a speaker, with a passive crossover inn between.
active multi-way is when the crossover is infront of the power amplifier, and the filters are not made out of passive elements, active crossover multiway is when the corssover is an active one .
2.1 has some variations too.
it can be a stereo amp driving 2 speakers + a subwoofer (commonly referd as tri-wireing in autmotive stuff here)
it can be with a stereo amp and a dedicated sub amp driving speakers, with all of them having passive crossover in between the amplifier and speakers, and active one, and aactive xover one, and even just a single stereo amp driving a pair of fullrangers and in parallel a single dual voicecoil sub/bass driver with 2 crossovers.

i think those are all the versions.
i don't think there is a universal standard...
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Old 29th April 2015, 07:16 AM   #10
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Bi wiring means use of two wires, having 2 cores each, from one amplifier output to connect to four terminals on a speaker, like Klipsch RB81 II. Whether it is good is questionable according to one study, I read.

Gajanan Phadte
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