62V chip amp / need help - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Chip Amps

Chip Amps Amplifiers based on integrated circuits

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 8th May 2014, 08:26 PM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Default 62V chip amp / need help

Hello everyone,

few years ago I built an amplifier and it didn't work, I checked everything, shematic, PCB, made new one with new components and it still didn't work (many claimed that shematic was fine). I gave up.

Now that I have some parts left I could use them to build another amplifier, I decided I'd use chip amp and power transistors to get some power. So what I'm asking is some simple shematic or link to project, something that works, because I don't want to screw this up.
Power supply from last amplifier is 400VA, 62V-0--62V DC. Problem appears in finding chip amp which could handle such a voltage.

Can someone tell me what should I do? Could I reduce voltage somehow and use low power chip amp + power transistors or is there any chip amp which could handle +/-62v? I wouldn't care if that chip would give only 100W, but I wouldn't go lower than that. Also, I don't care about speakers it would drive or if it is mono/stereo. I just don't want this PS to collect dust. Any help is highly appreciated.

Last edited by dark2knife; 9th May 2014 at 12:10 AM. Reason: mistake
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th May 2014, 10:02 AM   #2
AndrewT is online now AndrewT  Scotland
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Scottish Borders
Reduce your mains voltage to 110/120Vac.
That will reduce your transformer to a 200VA and give +-31Vdc.

Or build an lme498xx based amplifier.
__________________
regards Andrew T.
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th May 2014, 11:20 AM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Thanks for your help. I don't think solution could be reducing main voltage in my case, but searching for lme49810 brought me to ebay. There I found complete kit, already soldered on board, that seems it could handle voltage of 62V, it produces 300w of power, guessing RMS, so it is powerful as the one I failed at building before.

Now, I am quite a noob here and I don't know if my PS would be "compatible" with this amp. This is because in description it says "Power mode: dual power mode, the voltage drive and current power output level to separate power supply."
Also, on picture I can see some V- and V- pins together with +/-Vcc.
Here is link to item and picture:
ebay amp link

Pic: Amplifier picture
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th May 2014, 01:10 PM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
I meant to say -V and +V pins. I found shematic for this, and realized what it is(voltage drive). Can I just use same PS in a way that I connect +Vcc to +V and -Vcc to -V?
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th May 2014, 08:41 PM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
mmm well, the thing is right now it makes no difference if it would work or not.
You have failed for unknown reason to make an amp based on a correct schematic.
So, most probably if you want some joy, you should try something less complicated by design. I if i was you, would shoot for a minimalistic chipmap. An car radio amp by default is very forgiving, and is literally fool proof.
for powering, 3x 4.5 volt rated dry battery in series will be just fine for many-many hours.
nope, that is not the amp You want in the end, but to get there, there is a path that one must take first.
The nextone would be a gainclone -ish type, lm1876 or tda2052 or alike.
Them, when you did experiment, and did learn from the projects, should you only try even more complicated stuff.

by default, one should be able to wire up a pre-made kit, but knowledge is needed even for that. and certain set of skills, and understanding what the pins do, why they do.
You may end up with a bad experience again if you just try to do something complicated, a bad taste in the mouth is not really the best.

from one point of view, an assembled kit may seem promising, but in reality sometimes it would be harder to trouble shoot than say.. a clumsy home made point to point chipamp with minimal parts count.
other than that +- 62 volts is in the region of danger, not to mention the main's side.

please, consider an other prject, that does not involve high voltage, or main's voltage.
a dry cell if very forgiving to mistakes, 13,5 volt single supply is quite safe to fool around with.
but even so, proper grounding, proper connection of connectors -like twisting the wires, and so on- practices that are mandatory for bigger projects are in need of development on Your side. it would be quite logical to play with something inexpensive, forgiving of errors/mistakes/ experiments, and contains no lethal voltage/current.

this is my best advice for You.
not pointing a gun at your head and forcing You to take it, but i do hope You are going to take it.
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th May 2014, 09:40 PM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
I'm not that kind of noob, because since I was kid, I loved working with electricity.
In school they taught us how to make basic amp with one transistor, few of them.
My soldering skills are pretty much good. I built few headphone amps, car amps, portable amp that run on batteries.
So I knew what I was going into.

Amp that didn't work I gave to some guys that had more experience in building amp, and they couldn't figure out what was wrong.
When building it, I had enough documentation to follow, how to test it and configure it. After few attempts on rebuilding it, I gave up.
I went to same shop to buy new components for it, so that may be a problem, but since I can't just throw my money on something
that may or may not work, I decided to build amp which could be simpler, and chip amps usually are simpler.

Another option is to try, and hopefully succeed in rebuilding same amp, but if I find someone willing to check schematic and PCB to be 100% sure it works.

Last edited by dark2knife; 9th May 2014 at 09:56 PM. Reason: Mistake
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th May 2014, 07:44 AM   #7
AndrewT is online now AndrewT  Scotland
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Scottish Borders
Quote:
This is because in description it says "Power mode: dual power mode, the voltage drive and current power output level to separate power supply."
This does not sound like you are describing a transformer + rectifier + smoothing capacitors.
What have you got?
__________________
regards Andrew T.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th May 2014, 10:23 AM   #8
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
I've got: transformer, rectifier, smoothing capacitors. I'll just post shematic of it.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Power Supply.jpg (80.7 KB, 130 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th May 2014, 01:22 PM   #9
AndrewT is online now AndrewT  Scotland
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Scottish Borders
This is perfect for powering an LME based amplifier.
__________________
regards Andrew T.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th May 2014, 03:00 PM   #10
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Yea, but how can I make it to be lets say 62V for LME chip, and 57V (it says it should be 5V difference) for power transistors?
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help on power supply for Chip Amp & Op Amp pra3718 Chip Amps 6 4th September 2012 04:24 PM
63V caps, 62V B+ PSU ehh limono Power Supplies 5 2nd April 2011 02:47 AM
Suitable woof & tweet for CV Full Range chip amp? lunchmoney Chip Amps 3 20th March 2011 06:00 PM
Chip Amp LM3886 stereo kit - built & ready to go cdoggy81 Swap Meet 8 24th February 2009 08:26 PM
Who has tried a current boosted op-amp (with a transistor) as a chip-amp buffer? sardonx Chip Amps 18 19th March 2005 12:23 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 07:24 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2