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-   -   Best capacitance for Gainclone (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/chip-amps/251159-best-capacitance-gainclone.html)

Joerytech 13th February 2014 06:58 PM

Best capacitance for Gainclone
 
Continuing the off topic discussion from here: http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/chip-...ml#post3818236

mindutis 13th February 2014 07:05 PM

The more the better.

Joerytech 13th February 2014 07:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mindutis (Post 3818482)
The more the better.

It seems not everybody agrees with you

mindutis 13th February 2014 07:24 PM

Well some still listens to mono recordings :)
Anyway, 4700uF minimum. I like it 10mF or much more. If it is even more then soft start is needed.

Joerytech 13th February 2014 07:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mindutis (Post 3818512)
Well some still listens to mono recordings :)

Its maybe you that lives in the past when people thought that bigger was always best.......

Robert Kesh 13th February 2014 09:52 PM

Ideally just 1nF. On the power pins. Nothing on the PSU, just feed the chip amp straight from the rectifier.

Destroyer OS. 13th February 2014 10:04 PM

High capacitance is fine, but the average 10-15,000uf cap is garbage. Spend the $ to make it a very good, very fast capacitor or use multiple smaller values. This seems to escape everyone, always trying to find a compromise between enough capacitance for bass, and yet not destroy the highs.

Peter Daniels has used 100/1000uf and 1500/50uf for Chip/PSU. Blackgate N/Blackgate STD, Panasonic FC/Panasonic FC. In either situation the caps are small enough and responsive enough to provide good quality music, bass maybe respective of speaker load however. But a lot of people on here are aware that 10-15,000uf has some serious merit, per channel.

What would I try? Hm, well I'd try a few things perhaps. But I think the approach PD took was legit. However I'd probably use Elna SIlmic II's or Nichicon FG's to play around with these days.

I wouldn't be doing any mythical bypass caps of small value (film caps or whatever) that are just ringers.

mrWagner 14th February 2014 08:30 AM

Ideally there should be infinite capacity for the amp, so it gets the same voltage always. If it is not infinite, as the 50/60Hz goes, 90% of the time the chip gets the juice only from the capacitor and not from the transformer. And I guess this explains why bigger is better. Don't really understand why there is an argument at all.

mindutis 14th February 2014 08:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mrWagner (Post 3819128)
Ideally there should be infinite capacity for the amp, so it gets the same voltage always. If it is not infinite, as the 50/60Hz goes, 90% of the time the chip gets the juice only from the capacitor and not from the transformer. And I guess this explains why bigger is better. Don't really understand why there is an argument at all.

Yes, ripple current is up to us to decide. Yes, it is 100Hz after a rectifier. The argue is following that the signal is traveling through the power supply capacitance. And high capacitance damps the high side of a freq response. Connect many smaller caps in parallel was the idea. Anyway. It is not difficult to measure the frequency response at the certain points and see the dB difference. I was using 10mF power supply caps with no problems.

frank1 14th February 2014 09:39 AM

Some time ago, I built a test amp with relay switchable capacitors so I could change the value from the listening position after reading a load of rubbish here.

The small values just gave and apparent loss of bass with no other noticeable affects.
I wouldn't personally bother with many small capacitors in parallel as I was measuring about 0.01Ohm ESR @ 200kHz from my 10,000uF caps.
Frank


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