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Old 18th November 2003, 08:50 PM   #1
JayV is offline JayV  Sweden
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Default have anyone tried this chip?

http://www.linkwitzlab.com/STK4050V_1_3.pdf

can i use this with 45-50V rails? or is the maximum supply voltage the difference between the rails?
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Old 18th November 2003, 09:04 PM   #2
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Datasheet:

Maximum supply voltage VCC max 95 V , so +40V and -40V
are ok (80V), +50V and -50V (100V) are not.

I have no experience with this module , but I do with some others, they can take usually quite some abuse, but soundquality is average.
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Old 18th November 2003, 09:06 PM   #3
GregGC is offline GregGC  Canada
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The absolute max is +/-95V. Sounds like 95VDC per rail. And+/-66VDC. I understan it as +66V and -66V total of 132V.
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Old 18th November 2003, 09:09 PM   #4
JayV is offline JayV  Sweden
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:/ then i guess i have to forget chip amps.. thats annoying as i need 10 channels....
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Old 18th November 2003, 09:14 PM   #5
Nuuk is offline Nuuk  United Kingdom
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The question I would ask is: if Mr Linkwitz goes to such pains to design and build his lousdspeakers and chooses the expensive drivers that he does, would he recommend chip amps if they were not up to the job?
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Old 18th November 2003, 09:14 PM   #6
GregGC is offline GregGC  Canada
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I think you are safe with 50vdc per rail .
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Old 18th November 2003, 09:21 PM   #7
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With +40V and -40V rails you would get around 70Vt-t
This translates in 300W rms into 8 Ohm. Also with the modules I used from the same company the voltage was always specified with the 2 rails together.
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Old 18th November 2003, 09:21 PM   #8
JayV is offline JayV  Sweden
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probably because its pretty big project to build 6 channels im building the thors also and plan to use 4 amplfiers instead of 2 for the 10" xls... so i have to build 10 amps :/
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Old 18th November 2003, 10:23 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally posted by sayang001
With +40V and -40V rails you would get around 70Vt-t
This translates in 300W rms into 8 Ohm. Also with the modules I used from the same company the voltage was always specified with the 2 rails together.
70V peak to peak = 35V peak
RMS = .707 * peak =~ 25V
P@8ohm = (25^2)/8 = 78 Watts
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Old 19th November 2003, 04:20 PM   #10
PRR is offline PRR  United States
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The spec-sheet is pretty clear.

With +/-66V it will make 200 watts in 8Ω. 200W in 8Ω is 56 volts peak, so they are allowing 10V drop across the chip at full rated power, not unreasonable at the rated distortion. It clearly must have more than 112V DC across the chip to make that power; actually they want 132V rail-to-rail to cover losses and leave some bias on peaks for low THD.

Then they cite output noise and "neutral voltage" at +/-80V conditions. There is noise even when an amp is at full power, but we usually measure noise at zero signal. "Neutral voltage" seems to be DC offset, also most conveniently measured at zero signal. So they seem to be assuming a power supply that is +/-80V at no-signal, +/-66V at full-power, a fairly reasonable spec.

Then there is a maximum rating of +/-95V. The "+/-80V" will wander up and down with utility company voltage; they are allowing a reasonable 18% leeway from "normal idle voltage" to over-voltage blow-up rating. I suspect they really use 200V rated transistors and shave 5% safety factor when they rate the whole assembly. (BTW: this is not a monolithic "chip", it is a built-up hybrid.) I would expect 99 out of a hundred STK4050V to survive idling at 200V or even 250V (+/-125V) for days on end, though putting high signal through at that voltage might kill a bunch of them.

> i have to build 10 amps

This is a 200 watt amp. The power input when making 200W is at least 300W, and tends to be more like 400W at the wall-power side of the power transformer. Times 10 is 4,000 watts. Few homes have that much power on one circuit. Most home fuses will pop just tring to start-up the power supply you'd need for ten 200W channels.

> can i use this with 45-50V rails?

Yes.

If you mean +/-25V, this hybrid is way bigger than you need, and may not give its best THD at such low voltage, but it will certainly work. Power output is about 25W in 8Ω. The "GainClone" type chips are probably a much better plan at that power level.

If you mean +/-50V no-load sagging to +/-45V at full-load: power output is about 75 watts at low THD, touching 100W when clipping gets gross. Ten channels of that "can" be fed from common household outlets, but you probably need some soft-start system to keep from popping house fuses at switch-on.

> use 4 amplfiers instead of 2 for the 10" xls...

Note that these modules are rated 8Ω. At these power levels, a too-low impedance will kill an amp like this. You can not parallel these amplifiers; and you can't bridge them except in 16Ω load.

The Sanken (now Sanyo) modules are OK amplifiers, nothing special. Sound just like a good 1980 Japanese receiver. They do not have good short protection and do not have overheat protection. They tended to be pretty robust even under abuse, and I'm sure they would drive 8Ω speakers to 200W all day long if the heatsink temperature was not high enough to burn your finger.

Can you actually get these modules today? I used a LOT of their 30V and 80W modules back around 1980. I have never seen them used in large production. Being hybrid, they are stock parts assembled on a machine that can do many types of modules, including CATV amplifiers which do have a steady market. But be sure you can get these modules (and spares) before you plan a box around them.
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