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Old 1st January 2013, 10:00 PM   #11
sreten is offline sreten  United Kingdom
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Hi,

So response down to 0.5Hz is pointless. As is down to DC, all drivers
do DC by moving off centre depending on the voltage, but it does
not matter, visually you can see it, practically its useless.

Audacity may do 1Hz but :

"The song bass I love you plays notes a little lower than 1hz"

doesn't, whatever you are actually referring to.

rgds, sreten.
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Old 1st January 2013, 10:07 PM   #12
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you haven't seen it for yourself.. I have..
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Old 1st January 2013, 10:27 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by realflow100 View Post
is it possible to get 1 watt rms or even 5 watts rms?from a 5 watt chip amp?
First of all, I believe there is technically no such thing as "Watts RMS", or "RMS power", that's just confused marketing speak. Output power in Watts is computed using RMS voltage/current.

Secondly, you can certainly get 1 Watt out of a 5 Watt chip amp. A chip amp being rated at 5 Watts just means 5 Watts is the maximum it can put out before being damaged by overheating. The chip isnt always putting out 5 Watts no matter what. If you turn your music down quiet enough the chip will happily put out 0.1 Watts. The same is true of a 500 Watt amp or any other amp.

Earlier DUG suggested you get rid of the output capacitor and go direct coupled, to avoid filtering out the super low frequencies that you for some reason care about, and you said "it wouldn't have as much power would it though right". I don't believe that is true at all. The output capacitor does nothing to provide power, you won't get more power out of an amp by increasing the output cap and keeping the input levels and gain constant. The output cap just blocks DC, and filters low frequencies as a side-effect. In a design that doesn't need a DC blocking cap (like one with a dual power supply, or a virtual earth), there will be no filtering of low frequencies with no influence on the output power.

I am pretty sure putting 1 Hz through a loudspeaker is a Very Bad Idea, and will eventually kill a speaker for the same reasons that DC will.
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Old 1st January 2013, 10:54 PM   #14
sreten is offline sreten  United Kingdom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by realflow100 View Post
you haven't seen it for yourself.. I have..
Hi,

Your tedious lack of basic understanding is frustrating. I've seen
a shedload more of everything than you have, comes with age.

Except now I understand most of it, not misunderstand it.

rgds, sreten.
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Last edited by sreten; 1st January 2013 at 11:04 PM.
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Old 1st January 2013, 11:07 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sreten View Post
the cone "appears" to move in and out at low frequency, but
that isn't producing low frequencies, its an optical illusion.
Is this kind of like the illusion where the wheel of a car looks to be rotating slowly backward, even though it is rotating rapidly forward, because of the eye's low "sample rate"? The cone is moving at some audible frequency with the property that when the eye takes snapshots at around 24 Hz it appears to be smoothly moving at some lower frequency? Kind of like a visual equivalent of aliasing, actually, I guess.
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Old 1st January 2013, 11:11 PM   #16
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Also, sreten, how are you able to be absolutely certain that the song this guy is on about does not contain sub-1 Hz content? I don't doubt you on that point for a second, but I'm interested in learning: is there something about the decoding algorithms for mp3 and similar formats which makes this technically impossible? Does the Redbook standard or something like it prohibit frequencies below a threshold? Or is it just the case that any and all professional recording studios would unquestionably filter this kind of sound out to protect equipment?
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Old 1st January 2013, 11:16 PM   #17
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try the song on your own speakers..
If you see your speaker cone moving around 20hz 10hz or less. you got a good subwoofer and amplifier..
And the song actually does play that low.. If you open the file in audacity and look through the waveform its pretty obvious..
If I removed the capacitor I would have 6-12volts DC going to the little tiny 10 watt speaker :O

Last edited by realflow100; 1st January 2013 at 11:19 PM.
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Old 1st January 2013, 11:25 PM   #18
sreten is offline sreten  United Kingdom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lmaurits View Post
Also, sreten, how are you able to be absolutely certain that the song this guy is on about does not contain sub-1 Hz content? I don't doubt you on that point for a second, but I'm interested in learning: is there something about the decoding algorithms for mp3 and similar formats which makes this technically impossible? Does the Redbook standard or something like it prohibit frequencies below a threshold? Or is it just the case that any and all professional recording studios would unquestionably filter this kind of sound out to protect equipment?
Hi,

Your last point applies to nearly everything. There is nothing in the
standards to prevent silly levels of very low frequencies down to DC.

rgds, sreten.
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Old 1st January 2013, 11:34 PM   #19
sreten is offline sreten  United Kingdom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by realflow100 View Post
try the song on your own speakers..
If you see your speaker cone moving around 20hz 10hz or less. you got a good subwoofer and amplifier..
And the song actually does play that low.. If you open the file in audacity and look through the waveform its pretty obvious..
If I removed the capacitor I would have 6-12volts DC going to the little tiny 10 watt speaker :O

Hi,

Making out your right and providing no information whatsoever so
that people cannot check it is a pretty pointless exercise in ego.

You need to rearrange your attitude to knowledge and information.

rgds, sreten.
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When your only tool is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail - Abraham Maslow

Last edited by sreten; 1st January 2013 at 11:43 PM.
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Old 1st January 2013, 11:44 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by realflow100 View Post
If I removed the capacitor I would have 6-12volts DC going to the little tiny 10 watt speaker :O
With a single-supply amplifier, unbridged, sure. By using a bridged amplifier, or a dual-supply amplifier (either with a true dual-supply or a single supply using a virtual earth, although that last option has other problems), you can connect your amp directly to your speakers with no capacitor and there will be no (or very little) DC through them. Then you can use Audacity or whatever to play arbitrarily low frequencies (and risk damaging your speakers). If you really are fixated on < 1Hz content for some reason, this is probably the way to go, otherwise you will need stupidly large (and expensive) capacitors.
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