my 60hz korea amp on 50hz aussie power, help - diyAudio
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Old 9th December 2012, 11:12 AM   #1
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Default my 60hz korea amp on 50hz aussie power, help

Hi, everyone I have a situation, I have a amplifier which was transported from overseas, it came from Korea, and its model is a spa-3200, I googled it and found nothing on it.
Anyhow basically my problem is this, it’s a 220v @ 60hz, being in Australia we run on 50hz. Now I’ve been reading many websites regarding 50hz/60hz and some people are its ok, others tell me I’m going to burn out the transformer, and I was thinking of replacing it with a aussie 50hz one, I went to this website [/SIZE][/FONT]http://www.techtronics.com.au/p/1159...RMERS_TOROIDAL and wanted to find a suitable replacement but I don’t know the specs of my existing transformer, when I measure the output voltage my fear is that because of the hz, it will give me a higher reading on the output voltage therefore I wouldn’t know what I could replace it with. Attached is some pictures of the amplifier on the link below, I was also hoping for the time being to attach a computer fan near the transformer so it can disperse heat away from the transformer to keep it within operating temperatures, I’m good with electronics but I’m not the best at it so I figured I’d ask someone who specialises in amps,
So far with the fan I reduce the 40c idle temperature down to about 30c, but so far I haven’t put it under load for more than 15 minutes.
Heres the link with the pictures, what do you all think?

http://imageshack.us/g/687/001xgh.jpg/

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Please help me with this..
meanwhile my new speakers which have only been used twice decided to deteriorate see pics.

Last edited by bwtechguy; 9th December 2012 at 11:55 PM.
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Old 9th December 2012, 12:19 PM   #2
Mooly is offline Mooly  United Kingdom
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Going from 60 to 50 Hz shouldn't be an issue.
I'm assuming it is a chip amp so I would see what it uses (the chips) and actually measure what your supply rails are now.

Isn't Australia 230 volts ? That means that a 220v tranny on 230 volts will give a slightly lower voltage anyway.
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Old 9th December 2012, 12:22 PM   #3
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
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Ask the supplier if it is a universal transformer.
A universal transformer is rated to work with 110/120Vac and with 220/240Vac as well as @ both 50Hz and 60Hz.

Or ask specifically: is it rated to work on 50Hz?
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Old 9th December 2012, 12:24 PM   #4
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooly View Post
Going from 60 to 50 Hz shouldn't be an issue.
I'm assuming it is a chip amp so I would see what it uses (the chips) and actually measure what your supply rails are now.

Isn't Australia 230 volts ? That means that a 220v tranny on 230 volts will give a slightly lower voltage anyway.
no.
a 220Vac transformer running on 230Vac will give out a higher voltage and run at a higher temperature.
A 60Hz transformer when fed with 50Hz will also run at a higher temperature.
He is right to ask.
But we can't tell him/her the answer.

Did Australia change their supply equipment (generators and transmission transformers) to allow operation at a different voltage?
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Old 9th December 2012, 12:32 PM   #5
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Australia is nominally 240V. At my house it is usually around 248V. But it can drop to around 230V in some area's.

It's been 240V all my life. I think there was some talk at some stage of changing to 230V but it has never eventuated.

Tony.
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Old 9th December 2012, 12:40 PM   #6
Mooly is offline Mooly  United Kingdom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AndrewT View Post
no.
a 220Vac transformer running on 230Vac will give out a higher voltage and run at a higher temperature.
A 60Hz transformer when fed with 50Hz will also run at a higher temperature.
He is right to ask.
But we can't tell him/her the answer.

Did Australia change their supply equipment (generators and transmission transformers) to allow operation at a different voltage?
Your quite right Andrew... the hazards of quickly posting a reply

(I just thought over lunch about what I posted and came back to correct it)
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Old 9th December 2012, 11:58 PM   #7
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i've edited the post with the pics, just waiting on it to upload.

in one of the pictures, the transformer clearly has written on it 220/60/ij3
which means 220v @ 60hz. it doesn't have any voltage option or any way of changing it unless i replace it with a aussie 240v @ 50hz. i just don't know where to go from here?
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Old 10th December 2012, 01:54 AM   #8
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For * most * electronics I think that the mains frequency is irrelevant. Usually it goes through the step-down transformer and turns into DC via the rectifiers. I have only ever heard it is a problem with motors. I would be more worried about the slight ? voltage differences.
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Old 10th December 2012, 02:55 AM   #9
freax is offline freax  Australia
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my line voltage varies from anywhere south of the border, down mexico lane (200v) to I got a gal I love in North and South Dakota...258v

But that is because I'm sharing a 100 amp feedline with other people.

I take no responsibility if you injure yourself or damage your equipment by following my advice here.

If you want to stabilize it then get yourself a variac transformer from tortech or ebay and step it down to 220v.

Tortech Australia's specialist in toroidal and step-down transformers

The tortech ones arent cheap though.

28c is fine tho for a transformer, 40c might be a bit on the burly side though... I would be worried and get a variac, I second what other people here are saying about the frequency, that would really only affect clocks that get their timing from the mains, and certian motors, but the voltage might shorten this amps life, I doubt it would make anything cook though, if your transformer gets above 60c after running it for a while I would be worried and shut it off, also watch out for any smells, a smell is an early sign of failure.

The variac will come in handy later on too when testing other amplifiers, and will find a quick buyer if you ever want to sell it.
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Last edited by freax; 10th December 2012 at 03:06 AM.
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Old 10th December 2012, 02:35 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freax View Post
my line voltage varies from anywhere south of the border, down mexico lane (200v) to I got a gal I love in North and South Dakota...258v

But that is because I'm sharing a 100 amp feedline with other people.

I take no responsibility if you injure yourself or damage your equipment by following my advice here.

If you want to stabilize it then get yourself a variac transformer from tortech or ebay and step it down to 220v.

Tortech Australia's specialist in toroidal and step-down transformers

The tortech ones arent cheap though.

28c is fine tho for a transformer, 40c might be a bit on the burly side though... I would be worried and get a variac, I second what other people here are saying about the frequency, that would really only affect clocks that get their timing from the mains, and certian motors, but the voltage might shorten this amps life, I doubt it would make anything cook though, if your transformer gets above 60c after running it for a while I would be worried and shut it off, also watch out for any smells, a smell is an early sign of failure.

The variac will come in handy later on too when testing other amplifiers, and will find a quick buyer if you ever want to sell it.
the good news is tortech isn't far from me, but i'm unsure this will help me, i don't believe the voltage is my problem, many devices are 220-240v, and my transformer is 220v, my problem is the 60hz,

i found a article saying its a bad idea

referring to the section of the page "4 - frequency" part

Voltage and Frequency

basically he was suggesting that 60hz transformers are made smaller that the same 50hz one, and the 60hz often uses a lower grade steel lamination,
he goes on to mention:
Part of the design process for a transformer is to ensure that there are enough primary turns to prevent the steel core from saturating. This depends on the voltage and the frequency. If the frequency is reduced (and 10Hz or 16.6% makes a big difference), there are no longer sufficient turns to prevent saturation. When the core saturates, the primary winding of the tranny draws much more current from the mains than normal - not just 16% more though, it can easily exceed 100% more.
The result is that the transformer overheats, and will eventually fail.. There is actually no difference between decreasing the frequency or increasing the voltage by the same ratio.

and then shows examples on the oscilloscope...

so i don't know. any ideas?
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