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Old 22nd September 2012, 12:07 AM   #1
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Default Transistor complication amplifier?

ok so you have a single transistor amplifier
when you apply a positive voltage to the base it moves a magic invsisible plug
(so to speak) so that electricity can move from the emitter to the collector... but where do you connect the negative side of the input? no where? because if you plugged it into either the collector or the emitter it would cause a short and break the total function of the transistor
so then how is it even supposed to work if you just short it out every time you hook up the negative wire of the input? (lets call the input to the base a mono headphone jack wire coming from a computer)

no matter where you hook up the negative wire it will ALWAYS cause a short between the emitter and the collector and the base
so what makes it possible to make the speaker or how do you even hook the speaker up to the transistor? in between the emitter and the positive of the power supply?
or the positive of the speaker wire in between the emittor, the positive of the power supply, then the negative of the power supply and then to the collector?
or between the collector and the negative of the power supply? or inbetween the base and emittor or base and collector??? WHERE??

and then where does the negative of the input go? just cut off and not needed?? heck no it has to go somewhere!! but where!!
its an impossible circuit I tell you!! no matter where you put the negative of the input theres gonna be a short between the emitter and the collector and the base!
mainly because the negative input acts as a (straight wire) when no electricity flows in it because of how it connects inside the computer

it only works when power is flowing through wire.. when no power goes through it acts as a straight wire and it could short out every connection between the base and the collector and the negative of the input and the positive of the input
therefore shorting out both your computer and the transistor and even the battery

so WHERE does the negative wire go to??? and where does the positive and negative of the speaker wires go to??

and this is why i think tube amplifiers make so much more sense... cause you know where to put the negative input wire on them!

Last edited by realflow100; 22nd September 2012 at 12:15 AM.
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Old 22nd September 2012, 01:13 AM   #2
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Why do you look so upset? People have been designing transistor amplifiers for a long time and there's ample theory that explains how to connect it. Check common emitter and common collector (perhaps in Wikipedia) and you'll find a simple answer.
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Old 22nd September 2012, 03:39 AM   #3
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i've tried all of those but they DONT work!
i actually experimented and when i finally got it to work (partially) I had it wired up completely different

is it because i have large transistors? cuz i dont have any tiny ones
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Old 22nd September 2012, 04:24 AM   #4
DUG is offline DUG  Canada
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I can sympathize slightly with your frustration.

I learned tube theory from the RCA Receiving Tube Handbook.

Then I discovered these things called transistors.

I had to learn something new.

This was in about 1971

I got an Elcom transistor replacement guide (still have it somewhere) and learned by looking at schematics.

Look for simple schematics and get used to the way transistors are used. Read data sheets, specifically maximum limits. Transistors are not as forgiving as tubes. Quite often they are destroyed faster than a fast fuse

Your understanding will happen.

The Amateur Radio Handbook (in libraries) is an excellent source.

(Of course, so is the internet.)

Learn well
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Old 22nd September 2012, 04:40 AM   #5
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well does a field effect transistor have any difference between a normal transistor? because i think i have a field effect transistor o.O is that why nothing is working?
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Old 22nd September 2012, 06:17 AM   #6
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Quote:
(lets call the input to the base a mono headphone jack wire coming from a computer)
No, let's not.
Hands-on is a great way to learn electronics, but since a person can't actually see what is happening some reading and understanding is a necessity. It simply isn't that intuitive.
Quote:
well does a field effect transistor have any difference between a normal transistor?
You tell us. The different basic concepts aren't hard to grasp, but some basic solid-state physics make it so much easier.
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Old 22nd September 2012, 06:43 AM   #7
Mooly is offline Mooly  United Kingdom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by realflow100 View Post
ok so you have a single transistor amplifier
when you apply a positive voltage to the base it moves a magic invsisible plug
(so to speak) so that electricity can move from the emitter to the collector... but where do you connect the negative side of the input? no where? because if you plugged it into either the collector or the emitter it would cause a short and break the total function of the transistor..........
Maybe I'm misunderstanding you but could the missing link be that the transistor is "biased on" and so the input signal doesn't just move "positive" and cause the transistor to conduct more, it also moves "less positive" and causes it to conduct less. The DC bias conditions on the transistor ensure it always conducts and operates in the linear region.

The pos and neg connections of a signal source or speaker are all relative with the voltage on one being measured with repect to the other. There are no absolutes.
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Old 22nd September 2012, 08:02 AM   #8
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by realflow100 View Post
i've tried all of those but they DONT work!
I don't believe you!
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Old 22nd September 2012, 09:34 AM   #9
DF96 is offline DF96  England
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Yes, the OP is right. Transistors make no sense. All the people who 'design' with them are just being very lucky, and play around until something sort of works but nobody knows why. All the people writing books and web pages about circuit theory are just making it up so they can look intelligent and maybe make some money.

Maybe I should go on a flying forum and tell them that aeroplanes make no sense: everyone knows that something heavier than air can't possibly fly.
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Old 22nd September 2012, 12:16 PM   #10
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This might help a little

Transistor Circuits

John
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