beginner amp, 100? - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Chip Amps

Chip Amps Amplifiers based on integrated circuits

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 15th October 2003, 07:45 PM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: jaming to my music in a field
Default beginner amp, 100?

hay everybody, im new round here,

anyways im looking to build my first amp and am looking for some help or guidence from you guys.

im after an amp which has 100W per channel.

umm...

dont mind about briging, or parralell stuff.

umm... it must have a parts list, i can't work it out from a schmatic yet


anyway thanks in advance for anyone who is willing to help or point me in the right direction.



easy rider.


p.s

i have searched without any luck, maybe im looking for the wrong things.
  Reply With Quote
Old 15th October 2003, 10:27 PM   #2
ronc is offline ronc  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
First question is why do you need 100 watts?
ron
  Reply With Quote
Old 16th October 2003, 06:17 AM   #3
ir is offline ir  New Zealand
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: WGTN, NZ
Send a message via ICQ to ir
possibly used to 'rubbish' brand name stuff (AIWA, Sony, Philips)?

thus isn't aware that even 15W is TOO loud for the average room (thru good speakers)

  Reply With Quote
Old 16th October 2003, 04:42 PM   #4
ronc is offline ronc  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Very true Ir.
Easyrider if you are following this thread ,heres kinda sorta IMHO the way things work.
If you use innefficent speakers you will need lots of power.However low efficency drivers are kinda handicapped by slow response time.That is they dont really follow the incoming sine wave in a linear timely fashion.
Second point (if you are use to really crap low fi systems) if they are WAYYYYYY overrated in wattage output, in fact if you look around you will see some that the wattage output is actually greater than the incoming rated wattage?Maybe there is a small nuclear reactor in the amp?Most of the advertised watts ratings are just advertisng and have very little meaning in the real world.(Note! this applys to things that you buy at wallmart,circuit city, best buy ect ect,NOT to really higher end good amps)
I run +/- 12Vdc batt power on a LM3875T gainclone with Fostex fe-103e horns and i cant really turn the volume up to 50% as it just gets too loud,=>100Db.
I would suggest that you study up on efficent speakers and amps,then after you see what most of the ppl in these forums are about come on back and ask, then mabey we can help.
thanks
ron
  Reply With Quote
Old 17th October 2003, 08:04 AM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: jaming to my music in a field
ron clarke thanks very much on the info.

so what your saying is if i use high quality parts and some decent speakers I can use like 1 LM3886 chip or LM3875 in you case and get decent sound?


now could anyone direct me to a easy to build amp. must be ac powered though.

must have a parts list too, thats all i ask.


thanks.

easy rider
  Reply With Quote
Old 17th October 2003, 12:28 PM   #6
ronc is offline ronc  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
http://www.decdun.fsnet.co.uk/gainclone.html

A good site for the newbies.I would not try the buffered GC right at first , unless you have a pretty good handle on electronics.
ron
  Reply With Quote
Old 17th October 2003, 02:11 PM   #7
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
Quote:
Originally posted by ron clarke

However low efficency drivers are kinda handicapped by slow response time.That is they dont really follow the incoming sine wave in a linear timely fashion.
ron

Come on ron...
If you have a low efficiency speaker yes, they will sound slow and with a detached bass IF your amp is not man enough.
Give them a real amp and they will be fast.
There's no free lunch.
Generically speaking, less sensitive speakers have the disadvantage that they need power, but they have the advantage of being more linear.
Generically speaking again, a high sensitivity speaker shouts at you when playing at high volume levels.
  Reply With Quote
Old 17th October 2003, 04:46 PM   #8
sam9 is offline sam9  United States
diyAudio Member
 
sam9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Left Coast
ESP's project P3A sound.au.com is not out of the question for a first project, nor are the PM2 or PM22 from www.marchand.com.

This may sound dumb but I before you start be clear in your head which is more important:
A- a very, very sonicly excellent amp (low THD+n, good clipping charateristics, enough current to handle any forseen demands, etc) but in a cheap, ugly crappy enclosure.

or

B- a visually beautiful work of art that will catch the eye of your guests but which is of modest sound quality.

Of course you want both beauty and performance but trying for both in a first effort may get you neither. If you focus primarily on one goal you will be more likely to achieve that and with a little luck may not do too badly with the secondary goal as well.

I'm speaking from my own experience. This taught me that there is no such thing as "no compromise". But the compromise will work out better if narrow your focus initially.
  Reply With Quote
Old 17th October 2003, 05:23 PM   #9
ronc is offline ronc  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Well carl thats true, but i have had better results with light cones and BIG magnets and generally lower Qts.Of course all i do is rear loaded horns.
I find the faster speakers to sound more realistic to a live performance, closer anyway.
I am however working on a design now using the ff85k which has a bit higher Qts (around .46 i think) and a seperate dipole sub rolled off at around 140Hz. The fostex will be run full range.
I had to come up with a smaller design as some of my customers wanted some thing smaller(than the horns) and less prominante (read too damn obvious) for their main rooms.
ron
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th October 2003, 11:28 PM   #10
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Tulsa, OK
Quote:
Originally posted by ir
possibly used to 'rubbish' brand name stuff (AIWA, Sony, Philips)?

thus isn't aware that even 15W is TOO loud for the average room (thru good speakers)


I agree, however IMO it depends on if you are listening to music or watching movies.

At reference levels, my subwoofer amplifier actually clips on Starwars Episode 2 when the spaceship lands at the beginning of the movie.

And my amplifier is rated at 1400w into 4ohms bridged (QSC RMX 1450)

Same with my speakers, I am definatly using more than 15w on peaks, and my speakers are pretty darn efficient, ~95dB 1w 1m.

However, with music, you are right, I usually use around .1 watt or so

However I occasionally put earplugs in and crank it up to 110dB+ levels with music
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Beginner tareqx2 Multi-Way 19 22nd August 2007 05:53 PM
Help for a beginner? fishwinker Solid State 0 26th September 2005 08:52 PM
Amp for a beginner eRiCdWoNg Tubes / Valves 10 24th July 2004 04:00 PM
sorry, another beginner (hopefully soon) zach Solid State 3 18th January 2002 12:48 PM
A little help for the beginner? 959Turbo Multi-Way 3 10th January 2002 07:52 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 02:58 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2