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Old 27th June 2012, 09:02 PM   #11
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You can't cheat Ohm's law. You either need a lower impedance sub driver (already ruled out), or a higher rail voltage. If you don't have room for a DC-DC converter then I've already mentioned your only other viable option. If you do have room, then there's countless possibilities.
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Old 27th June 2012, 09:59 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by theAnonymous1 View Post
You can't cheat Ohm's law. You either need a lower impedance sub driver (already ruled out), or a higher rail voltage. If you don't have room for a DC-DC converter then I've already mentioned your only other viable option. If you do have room, then there's countless possibilities.
"You can't cheat Ohm's law. You either need a lower impedance sub driver (already ruled out), or a higher rail voltage."

To do what? I NEVER stated I needed X amount of power. I'm not trying to cheat anything. There are 1w, 5w, 7w, 10w, 12w, and on and on, ICs out there. There's 1000s of them. Wow you just like to argue facts I'm not arguing about. 20-30w is plenty for a 4" 4ohm sub. If I can fit two of them in there then I'll have 20w x2. I'd just use a 2ch IC or two 1ch ICs.

So here's the question again... What's the highest power, lowest parts count, possibly bridgable 2ch (or single channel) intergrated audio amplifier available? I came looking for IC suggestions not anargument over bridging and ohms law.

Being this is the Chip-Amp thread, I'd assume there are others who have built chip amps that may have some suggestions for ICs that would suit my needs or others to stay away from.

Last edited by lazzer408; 27th June 2012 at 10:03 PM.
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Old 27th June 2012, 10:29 PM   #13
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If you can find a TDA 1562 ...but it's out of production from many years
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Old 27th June 2012, 11:00 PM   #14
Minion is offline Minion  Canada
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If you use a Sub that is say 6db more sensitive than your drivers then you don"t need to feed the sub double the power (or use half the impedance) to get the same volume as the drivers ......

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Old 27th June 2012, 11:08 PM   #15
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If you use a Sub that is say 6db more sensitive than your drivers then you don"t need to feed the sub double the power (or use half the impedance) to get the same volume as the drivers ......

There's alot more involved then just driver sensitivity. Box design (sealed, ported, bandpass?) and location are a couple. There's no reflective surfaces like a wall or corner of a room. The openness of the system being installed in a motorcycle makes it more difficult to balance the system response. It will never sound good. It can only sound "good enough".
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Old 28th June 2012, 04:33 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by lazzer408 View Post
To do what? I NEVER stated I needed X amount of power. I'm not trying to cheat anything. There are 1w, 5w, 7w, 10w, 12w, and on and on, ICs out there. There's 1000s of them. Wow you just like to argue facts I'm not arguing about. 20-30w is plenty for a 4" 4ohm sub. If I can fit two of them in there then I'll have 20w x2. I'd just use a 2ch IC or two 1ch ICs.
OK, you obviously don't get it. Have fun.
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Old 28th June 2012, 08:47 AM   #17
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Getting closer. http://skory.gylcomp.hu/alkatresz/tda1554q_cnv_2.pdf I can run two outputs in stereo and bridge the other two.

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OK, you obviously don't get it. Have fun.
Do tell. I'm interested to know if it's something I don't.

Last edited by lazzer408; 28th June 2012 at 08:50 AM.
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Old 28th June 2012, 03:20 PM   #18
MarianB is offline MarianB  Romania
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Greetings.

@lazzer408 what you need to understand is that the main factor that limmits the power output of any device is the voltage, unless in class H ( like TDA1562 ) the device can only drive the output signall as much as the voltage let's it do, For example in class AB singlke ended device powered on 12V single supply can only deliver about 7W, maybe 10 max on 4Ohm load, it cannot go higher cus that is the rail level of the signal, and a BTL device would give about twice as that. What you need to understand is that the peak of the wave cannot go higher than 6V ( on single ended device, 12V supply ), it actualy goes less cus some of that voltage is taken by the output devices to go in to on state, and the power output is the maximum possible (Vef^2)/Rload, Vef is voltage rail devided by about 1,41. TDA8560Q has 4 single ended power amplifiers connected inside in BTL config to give at the output only two bridged channels.

The best solution regarding the power output is indeed TDA1562, you could do with your last sugestion too, you would have 2 channels single ended giving a max of about 10W, and 1 BTL of about 20W ( 4Ohm all the way ).

As for a DC-DC converter to rise the voltage level what you need to understand is that although the converter gives the amplifier more voltage and thus more power, it still power up from 12V and the power in at the converter still has to be at least the same as the power out ( that is in the ideal case of 100% efficiency, but it is not ), so if let say you want a multi channel amplifier of for example 2X20W and 1X40W, and so a total of 80W power output for the speakers, that means the power supply unit would have to give about 120W power cus the efficiency of the amplifier is not 100% at all, and more so at the imput of the converter, so botom line is that the 12V potential that will power the whole thing has to deliver much more current, more than 10A in this example, so if you decide to use such method than it would be a good idea first to know what current can you supply the amplifier with and then you can think about how and what to built.

Last edited by MarianB; 28th June 2012 at 03:33 PM.
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Old 28th June 2012, 08:37 PM   #19
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It's for a motorcycle that has a 3ph alternator and a regulator/rectifier that outputs about 13.2-14.7v depending on RPM. I could tap the 3ph before it hits the regulator and get much higher then 12v but it would be unregulated and I have no idea what the rectified voltage actually is. The other issue is grounding a power supply built that way. I may have to keep the whole audio system isolated to avoid damage to the regulator. I understand the power limitations using a 12v supply and how the load impedance (and output stage voltage swing) limits the available current that can flow to the speaker.

I found another IC TDA8947J www.nxp.com/documents/data_sheet/TDA8947J.pdf


Can you give me your opinion of that vs. the TDA1562? Is there a 4ch SE version of the 1562?

Last edited by lazzer408; 28th June 2012 at 08:58 PM.
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Old 29th June 2012, 05:03 AM   #20
MarianB is offline MarianB  Romania
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I wouldn't tap on the alternator that way, the voltages obtained ar far too unstable and depend too much on it's rotation speed, i don't immagine you could built a stable amplifier that way.

I would still choose TDA1562, it has more power for the 12V due to it's class of opperation.
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