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Old 8th February 2011, 09:34 AM   #11
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Likewise, I also struggle to see the point.

My assumption is that you're trying to operate the device at a higher output power than it's rated to (thermally limited by).

But many other limits come into play usually well prior to thermal problems that invariably cause large distortion increases.

The answer usually would be just to parallel multiple devices and reap all the rewards associated with that (e.g. higher damping factor, higher current limits, etc.) And what's more, as well as being able to handle more heat dissipation, because the chips a physically separate objects, you can place them apart on a heatsink and get better heat spreading through the sink.

So...sorry, but I doubt this is one you're going to gain much from.
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Old 8th February 2011, 11:31 AM   #12
marce is online now marce  United Kingdom
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Look at heat pipes, and get the heat away from the device efficiently.
ie Thermacore
Amec Thermasol :: Heat Management and Thermal Control Solutions
CRS Engineering - Heat Pipes & Heat Sinks Manufacturers
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Old 8th February 2011, 11:54 AM   #13
sasmit is offline sasmit  India
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marce View Post
A water cooler for CPU like "Cooler Master" etc will work very well, an advantage in using water cooled setup is your placement can be very flexi. You have only a coolant pipe coming out from behind the IC bend it any way you want. The radiator fan assembly can be placed anywhere.

Heat pipes though a good solution are often fixed geometry and have to be custom made or at least tubes have to be bent according to your placement requirements.

Last edited by sasmit; 8th February 2011 at 12:00 PM.
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Old 8th February 2011, 12:04 PM   #14
sasmit is offline sasmit  India
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sasmit View Post
A water cooler for CPU like "Cooler Master" etc will work very well, an advantage in using water cooled setup is your placement can be very flexi. You have only a coolant pipe coming out from behind the IC bend it any way you want. The radiator fan assembly can be placed anywhere.

Heat pipes though a good solution are often fixed geometry and have to be custom made or at least tubes have to be bent according to your placement requirements.
A potential problem I see is that if you have multiple IC's then you'll need multiple water cooler as they are often designed only to cool the cpu and in some topend models the northbridge and the cpu .
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Old 8th February 2011, 12:41 PM   #15
Hiten is offline Hiten  India
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uncle_leon View Post
I'm working on a new heat transfer idea
I am noob in electronics but can a thermoelectric device (Temp. difference between two points of two different metals produces voltage) be applied to heatsinks ? Can the Voltage generated be utilized to light a bulb or power a preamp or charge a battery etc. ?
Regards.
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Old 8th February 2011, 08:30 PM   #16
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If you want to try something with heat pipes, You can buy a "zalman hard drive cooler" which has a whole bunch of heat pipes which can easilly be bent how you want with a "bending spring" which is a spring just bigger than the diameter of the pipe, that stops the pipe from flattening when you bend it.


I used them for an external heatsink CPU case/cooler, and the load temperature on a 60w CPU was great with only 3 heat pipes.
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Old 9th February 2011, 11:36 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harvie256 View Post
Likewise, I also struggle to see the point.

My assumption is that you're trying to operate the device at a higher output power than it's rated to (thermally limited by).
I never said it was my intention to dissipate as much power as possible, but to dissipate it as EFFICIENTLY as possible - which is a different story altogether

The objective I'm aiming for is a way of dissipating heat that:
- will not use any highly (electrically) conductive materials, to avoid unnecessary Eddy currents
- will not use any high dielectrics, because they accumulate static charge
- will have good vibrational properties, i.e. will shield the chip from outside vibrations, while allowing it to release its own vibrations freely (see 47 Laboratory philosophy)
- will be capable of maintaining constant low temperature of the chip (obviously)

This may seem like an impossible combination, but I believe it can be achieved. And I'll get a lot closer to that objective if I eliminate as much heat resistance as possible


Quote:
I am noob in electronics but can a thermoelectric device (Temp. difference between two points of two different metals produces voltage) be applied to heatsinks ? Can the Voltage generated be utilized to light a bulb or power a preamp or charge a battery etc. ?
Regards.
That is actually a very interesting idea! I'll have to look into that further.

Last edited by uncle_leon; 9th February 2011 at 11:41 AM.
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Old 9th February 2011, 12:05 PM   #18
marce is online now marce  United Kingdom
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I do PCB's for very (very) high reliability products, the variety of heat pipes etc (state change from liquid to vapour) are the most efficient way to remove heat from a device to an external heatsink. Especially where space is limited.
The other factors you metion such as eddy currents wont be a problem. Vibration control depends on the level of vibration encounted and the mounting methods of the device. For use in a static home envoironment this will be very little, and so some sort of compliant interface (Berquest thermal pads) would suffice. If its gonna encounter high vibration, plane, car etc then you have to engineer the solution depending on factors such as component positions, can it be bolted to the case etc etc.
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Old 9th February 2011, 12:12 PM   #19
marce is online now marce  United Kingdom
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Of course you could investigate peltier devices as mentioned, how cost effective they are I dont know. They are less efficient than heat pipes, but do not rely on gravity as much. Unshure about how much electrical noise they generate.
Thermoelectric cooling - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 9th February 2011, 12:23 PM   #20
x51 is offline x51  Bulgaria
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If you want to cool all the sides you could try something like dipping the IC (or the whole PCB) inside mineral oil. I heard of people using it to cool overclocked PCs. Its non-conductive an much cheaper than Fluorinert. But it does have lower thermal conductivity. Here is a video of it being used to cool a PC.
YouTube - Building a Mineral Oil Cooled PC
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