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Chip Amps Amplifiers based on integrated circuits

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Old 16th April 2010, 01:10 AM   #11
fiat79 is offline fiat79  United States
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That'll work! I actually had been reading/following along those great instructions you put together Peter!
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Old 16th April 2010, 01:26 AM   #12
ChrisA is offline ChrisA  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fiat79 View Post
Thanks for your reply David, my question was in regards to multiple boards, 4 to be exact and of course this will lead to a boatload of ground wires. I'm just wondering what is to be gained via this approach vs maybe jumpering the boards together and then a set of wires to ground.
Wires have resistance distributed along their length. If current flows in the wire the voltage is not constant along the length of the wire. So if you daisy chain a set of bords, each is at a different ground reference, sure it's only micro volts at most but it is so easy to make avoid this and just just a bit more wire

As you found you there is a stare ground on each PCB. This means yo can use a distributed star system. This saves a ton of wire and works just as well.

But as you asked "why" I had to say the reason is that the voltage along any wire carrying current in non-constant along it's length. (Unless the wire happens to be a super conductor.)
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Old 16th April 2010, 12:47 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisA View Post
Wires have resistance distributed along their length. If current flows in the wire the voltage is not constant along the length of the wire. So if you daisy chain a set of bords, each is at a different ground reference, sure it's only micro volts at most but it is so easy to make avoid this and just just a bit more wire

As you found you there is a stare ground on each PCB. This means yo can use a distributed star system. This saves a ton of wire and works just as well.

But as you asked "why" I had to say the reason is that the voltage along any wire carrying current in non-constant along it's length. (Unless the wire happens to be a super conductor.)
But in theory, all the ground lines on the PCB to their starpoint on the PCB are also different in lenght. You can't totally avoid that.
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Old 16th April 2010, 02:19 PM   #14
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
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Originally Posted by Sebastiaan View Post
all the ground lines on the PCB to their starpoint on the PCB are also different in length
and some of them are parts of two separate circuits and thus share their route with two or more different currents.
That sharing is what star power and star ground is trying to avoid.
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regards Andrew T.
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