How would you make this simple PCB or What? - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Chip Amps

Chip Amps Amplifiers based on integrated circuits

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 19th July 2007, 09:08 PM   #1
KP11520 is offline KP11520  United States
diyAudio Member
 
KP11520's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Default How would you make this simple PCB or What?

Hi All,

I want to build the Class A Bias JFET Cascode boards or PCBs for my new op amps or buy/get them somewhere, while I am waiting for the transistors to get here. I have no experience with making this on my own but want to try. Here is the circuit I am trying to add to my CD Player, please give your opinions, advice and direction as I start a new facet into this hobby (the last facet cost me an op amp.... Ahhh mere flesh wound!).

I will also add the schematic of the area of the op amps in the CD Player for advice on any Caps or other components that I should replace while the PCB is out! Thanks!

Regards//Keith
Attached Files
File Type: pdf class a bias jfet casccode pcb for opamps.pdf (58.1 KB, 162 views)
__________________
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME ****, why didn't he just buy dinner?
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th July 2007, 09:10 PM   #2
KP11520 is offline KP11520  United States
diyAudio Member
 
KP11520's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Part 2, Schematic for CD Player
Attached Files
File Type: pdf rcd-965bx op amp schematic.pdf (92.3 KB, 94 views)
__________________
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME ****, why didn't he just buy dinner?
  Reply With Quote
Old 21st July 2007, 02:21 PM   #3
KP11520 is offline KP11520  United States
diyAudio Member
 
KP11520's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
OK, let me ask this in a different way....

I have two NPN transistors that are type TO92. I need to mount them in a Cascode configuration with two pins to attach to my CDP main PCB, into the same holes as the two corresponding pins of the op amps.

I need to mount this onto a small "whatever." That is the question. What is the best way and what is best to use, to make a reliable platform for two small, delicate transistors wired properly to two small pins (also, what would you use for these pins or legs) that attach to the main PCB. Is this something I can make on breadboard or should I buy a PCB kit from the Shack or someplace better or is there a better idea altogether? It would be nice to make it be reliable and professional looking!

I have no experience with making a board or any other options that I am not aware of. If I am missing an option that is just what I need, also please let me know.

My lack of experience is why I am consulting your experience. I would hate to do something and find out a week later about the better way to do this and have to diaassemble the CDP again.

Thanks!

Regards//Keith
__________________
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME ****, why didn't he just buy dinner?
  Reply With Quote
Old 21st July 2007, 02:40 PM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
justblair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
You certainly can get adaptors that will let you mount transistors and small chips onto breadboard. They are easy to find from electronics supplies. I got some for transistors last time from Farnell/Newark, sorry I dont know the op amp, Adaptors for chips though can be expensive.

If you are nimble with a soldering iron, you can solder transistors straight into a board. You have to be carefull though, they damage easy if you heat them up too much.
  Reply With Quote
Old 21st July 2007, 10:20 PM   #5
KP11520 is offline KP11520  United States
diyAudio Member
 
KP11520's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Thanks Blair,

I have been searching, using Google for something to use and keep getting everything but what I am looking for!

Let me search on TO-92 sockets and breadboard and see what I can come up with. I have also been searching for "Pins" and "legs" for electronics and you should see what Google finds!

Just use your imagination and you will have a laugh!

Regards//Keith
__________________
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME ****, why didn't he just buy dinner?
  Reply With Quote
Old 21st July 2007, 10:43 PM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
nemestra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: UK
Quote:
Originally posted by KP11520
OK, let me ask this in a different way....

I have two NPN transistors that are type TO92. I need to mount them in a Cascode configuration with two pins to attach to my CDP main PCB, into the same holes as the two corresponding pins of the op amps.

I need to mount this onto a small "whatever." That is the question. What is the best way and what is best to use, to make a reliable platform for two small, delicate transistors wired properly to two small pins (also, what would you use for these pins or legs) that attach to the main PCB.

Hi Keith,

just want to clarify what you are attempting. I'm assuming you are removing two existing 5534 types and replacing with each with one OPA627 + two transistors? I would build this on stripboard/Veroboard and physically attach it using a couple of plastic pillars to the main board. The self-adhesive ones might be ok but you may be able to reuse one of the existing pcb mounting holes or find some other way. You an then wire to the holes of the removed 5534 using fine multistand or single core wire.

If you want to mount it using the connections from the opamp pins only then look at wire-wrap sockets or wirewrap pins. Very few people do wirewrap any more but the pins are long and sturdy. Alternatively companies like Samtec do a dazzling variety of extended DIL and SIL headers which could be used.

Hope I have correctly understood what you are attempting.

James
  Reply With Quote
Old 21st July 2007, 11:27 PM   #7
KP11520 is offline KP11520  United States
diyAudio Member
 
KP11520's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
James,

You understand perfectly and have given me some search terms to use as well! I think my biggest problem is the terminology I am using for my searches. After seveal days (2 hours each), I have come up with Squat (nothing useful).

You mentioned several very helpful things: stripboard/Veraboard, plastic pillars, fine multistrand or solidcore wire (that takes some doubt of degrading the mod, using wire, away), wire-wrap sockets and wire-wrap pins, Samtec and Extended DIL and SIL headers.

I think another problem is, for a newbie, I want the same results that the experienced and professionals would expect.

Thank you for stopping by and shedding some much needed light!



Regards//Keith
__________________
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME ****, why didn't he just buy dinner?
  Reply With Quote
Old 21st July 2007, 11:47 PM   #8
diyAudio Member
 
justblair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
Hi

I have been up for 2 days, woking on a pcb design for my gf's fast approaching birthday. So I am not thinking very straight.

I have been browsing Farnell for parts for the amp I am designing, and must have looked at my account 3 or 4 times before realising that I could find those transistor sockets from my previous purchase.

Here they are

Sorry for being such an unhelpfull dilbert.... My brain is fried!!!!

Blair

EDIT

DIP to SMT converters

Dont know if this is exactly what you are looking for, but it may help your search.

Surface mounting stuff onto printed boards is pretty easy if you use some liquid flux. A pen dispensor is my favourite. They last for a long time if you are doing the odd IC once in a while. I have seen Ziff socket versions as well, but they cost a lot. I'd invest in the flux and learn how to do it properly. You get better results for lless money. I learned all I needed from web tutorials. There are quite a few video tutorials if you search hard.
  Reply With Quote
Old 22nd July 2007, 02:56 AM   #9
KP11520 is offline KP11520  United States
diyAudio Member
 
KP11520's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Hello Blair,

Thanks again! I understand the fried brain thing completely because of my lack of knowledge and experience and way too many fruitless searches.

I spent days looking for video tutorials and only found one place at Tangentsoft.com. You aren't kidding about looking real hard!

I do hope, however, that as you fry your brain, you are at least using a healthy oil that won't add too much Cholesterol. Better yet, have a Pint to two, the alcohol helps keep the Cholesterol down, numbs the pain of your brain frying, and ultimately helps you fall asleep in your chair with your face down in the PCB.
It does have a downside..... a disappointing birthday for the Girlfriend. So please use cautiously!

Good luck to you!

I can do more effective searching now!

Regards//Keith
__________________
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME ****, why didn't he just buy dinner?
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th July 2007, 07:00 AM   #10
gootee is offline gootee  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Indiana
Blog Entries: 1
I suggest that you acquire the huge, free, paper versions of the catalogs from mouser.com (1854 pages) and alliedelec.com (2192 pages) (Digikey.com is good, too, but their paper catalog is not quite as helpful.) It's much easier and MUCH, much faster to just look at the pictures while browsing sections of the catalogs, than to try to search "blind" on the web. After that, it's easy to go to their site, search for a part number, and download the datasheet or go to the manufacturer's webpage. (Actually, mouser.com makes that part the easiest. But alliedelec.com's catalog now has mostly color photos. Both are _extremely_ valuable for more-easily "finding out what's available".)

Note that Mill-Max makes lots of different types of single "PC pins" and "PC Receptacles", and headers and sockets, too. Mouser.com carries many/most of theirs. It might be worth it to download the Mouser catalog pages that have the pictures of all of the Mill-Max pins and headers, etc. It's only a few pages. You might also want to look at things like the Aries Electronics Inc "DIP Fork Headers", such as mouser.com # 535-08-600-10 .

You might find some better ideas, or at least maybe some clues, here: http://www.electro-tech-online.com/g...-question.html .

If you do decide that you need to be able to etch a PCB, for almost no cost, with almost no equipment or supplies, in less than an hour, with high-quality results, I have it all right here:

http://www.fullnet.com/~tomg/gooteepc.htm

Good luck. Please let us know if you come up with something that works well.

- Tom Gootee

http://www.fullnet.com/~tomg/index.html
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Would this make a simple preamp? Jim Karr Digital Source 8 20th February 2006 08:24 PM
I'd like to make a simple 50 amplifier arnoldc Tubes / Valves 47 21st January 2005 09:09 AM
ok, i'll try and make it simple. PhoenixFL Tubes / Valves 9 13th May 2004 11:04 PM
I want to make a simple UL PP amp arnoldc Tubes / Valves 19 6th March 2004 02:32 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 10:14 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2