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-   -   Car FM Tuner for Home (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/car-audio/97554-car-fm-tuner-home.html)

Pano 6th March 2007 03:35 AM

Car FM Tuner for Home
 
Got a quick question that I can't find answered in previous posts.

Can anyone recommend an CAR version head unit for home use? It's the FM tuner I want.
Why? Well I put away all my receivers that were serving as FM tuners and want just a small, good quality FM tuner. Looking around at what's available in home FM tuners, they all seem large and expensive.

So I thought a car unit might serve well. Car radios often have better RF tuners than home radios, they have to. Small, too. Just feed it 12V and it's all good.

So what is a good radio unit? I don't care about the CD part, won't use it even if it has it. What I need is a good, small FM tuner. Any ideas?

Thanks guys!

Bama Slamma 6th March 2007 03:46 AM

An older Sony XPLOD is good. I have one myself. It will ultimately be installed on a boat my dad and I are building. The tuner is very sensitive so all stations come in as clear as a bell. They SAY it's 50 watts per channel, but I don't believe them. All you need is a 12 VDC power supply, antenna, and speakers and you're good to go. A 10 VAC transformer rectified and filtered will give you 14 VDC which is what automotive electrical systems run at with the motor running. Use a transformer of at least 50 VA for two speakers.

Pano 6th March 2007 04:45 AM

Hi Bama - thanks for the fast answer.

Quote:

Originally posted by Bama Slamma
The tuner is very sensitive so all stations come in as clear as a bell.
That's the kind of info I'm looking for, great! Forgot to mention that I will not be using the amplifier. Just want to run the preamp outs to my power amp and speakers at home. So it should be easy.

And good suggestion on the power supply and transfomers. Got plenty lying around here. Shouldn't even need much power if I don't use the amp.

Bama Slamma 10th March 2007 04:28 AM

You could use a 120 VAC to 12 volt DC "wall wart" as a power supply if you don't use the built in power amp. About 1/2 to 1 ampere output should be good. The radio draws only a few mA. Then again a wall wart's output may have a lot of 60 Hz hum in it. They probably can't fit a very big filter cap in there. I don't know how familiar you are with car stereo wiring harnesses so I'll give a rundown

Black Wire: Negative (grounded to car chassis)
Red: Main power (wired thru car's key switch)
Yellow: Battery lead (wired to a constant 12V source)
Gray, Purple, Green, White: Speaker Leads
Blue: Triggers any power antenna.

Just twist the red and yellow wires together and hook them to the positive of your supply. Connect the black to negative. You won't use any of the other wires. Be sure you hook up an antenna. Without one all you'll hear is static.

Zoran 10th March 2007 05:58 AM

It would be nice to find
old BECKER car radios...
with stereo FM...
they are very good units indeed
Becker had also tube car radios
Cheers

djQUAN 10th March 2007 02:10 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Bama Slamma
You could use a 120 VAC to 12 volt DC "wall wart" as a power supply if you don't use the built in power amp. About 1/2 to 1 ampere output should be good. The radio draws only a few mA. Then again a wall wart's output may have a lot of 60 Hz hum in it. They probably can't fit a very big filter cap in there. I don't know how familiar you are with car stereo wiring harnesses so I'll give a rundown

Black Wire: Negative (grounded to car chassis)
Red: Main power (wired thru car's key switch)
Yellow: Battery lead (wired to a constant 12V source)
Gray, Purple, Green, White: Speaker Leads
Blue: Triggers any power antenna.

Just twist the red and yellow wires together and hook them to the positive of your supply. Connect the black to negative. You won't use any of the other wires. Be sure you hook up an antenna. Without one all you'll hear is static.



take note that the continuous 12V on the yellow wire serves as memory so all settings are stored. no continuous power here means that things go back to factory settings everytime the unit is turned off.

blue - remote turn on (has 12VDC when the radio is on)
blue with white stripe - power antenna line (has 12V only when the tuner is on. has 0V when you switch to CD, tape etc.

also, the speaker leads are:
white - front left
grey - front right
green - rear left
violet - rear right

the positive wire is the solid color. the wire with the black stripe is speaker negative.

audiobahnkid592 11th March 2007 05:10 PM

I use a Pioneer DEH-P7700MP in my home setup and love it sounds excellent and comes in very clear, even with some stations that are weak on other radios.

EWorkshop1708 24th March 2008 02:16 AM

I\'m building a small sound system using a car stereo as the CD player and FM tuner, to reduce the size of my equipment, but have big system quality and sound.

I\'ll deliver about 12-14V for the radio, and +/-30V for the power amp.

TheMG 24th March 2008 04:39 AM

How about a DIY fm tuner?

Get one of those TEA5757-based tuner modules, a PIC mcu, an LCD display and some buttons... all good to go!

I\'ve started on one actually, but it\'s currently on hold due to my amplifier project which I\'m also using as a project for one of my college classes, so it has priority at the moment.

shagone 24th March 2008 06:46 PM

The Pioneer supertuner III is a good tuner that is in many many pioneer radios with very good reception. i think they are still used in some current models.


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