What is the best flux/rosin/colophony for car amps repair? - diyAudio
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Old 6th September 2006, 06:45 PM   #1
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Default What is the best flux/rosin/colophony for car amps repair?

The one I used lately absorbs carbon (from everywhere) and became good enough conductor to damage a FET by shorting it's leads So, cleanup is the must. I remember ~10 year ago I used pine colophony, and it was much better.
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Old 6th September 2006, 07:43 PM   #2
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You should not need any flux other than that in the core of the solder. If that flux is turning black, your iron is too hot.

I've used Kester 44 solder almost exclusively for 20+ years. When I've used other brands, it seemed like it was much more difficult to keep the tip clean.

Even if the flux doesn't cause you problems, it's a good idea to clean up the area with acetone. It makes the job look better and will make it easier to see if there are bad solder connections or open traces (which are sometimes almost microscopic).
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Old 6th September 2006, 08:56 PM   #3
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Thanks, Perry! I guess, I need to pick up a better solder. Mine has pretty much tiny amount of flux in a core.
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Old 8th September 2006, 09:55 PM   #4
dangus is offline dangus  Canada
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Like Perry says, go with a traditional rosin core solder, 60/40 or 63/37, Kester or Ersin Multicore.

I did try some water clean flux once which left a measurably conductive residue; maybe that's what you had? The flux didn't turn black, it was more kind of white with a waxy look and feel.

Isopropyl alcohol (isopropanol) works well for removing rosin flux, doesn't damage plastics like acetone can, and is presumably not too harmful to humans since they sell it as rubbing alcohol. If I'm doing a bunch of complete boards, I'll pour it into a shallow tray and soak them in it, scrub with a toothbrush, rinse with fresh alcohol, and blow dry with compressed air. But mostly I'll use put it in a pump spray bottle, or just dip a Q-tip if I'm cleaning up a small area of rework.
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Old 11th September 2006, 12:09 AM   #5
Jexx is offline Jexx  United States
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I also use Kester 44, best stuff out there without doubt! I think the worst I've tried was some stuff from Radioshack...that was awful
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