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Old 31st March 2006, 01:02 AM   #1
geek883 is offline geek883  United States
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Default Floating Ground Adapter?

I have been trying to install a JVC reviever (cheapy) into my '87 mustang. I bought the scosche wiring kit FD021. I didn't reallize I needed a "FLOATING GROUND ADAPTER", and was wondering if I could rig or make this. I don't know much about car audio so bare with me if I'm asking stupid questions. I did search through the forums, but could not find what I needed. I know it's a cheap part, but I live along ways from anywhere I could get it.

Thanks again for the forum and all the stuff I've learned from lurking in the shadows.
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Old 1st April 2006, 04:54 PM   #2
oPossum is offline oPossum  United States
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The floating ground adapter is required because your car has an amp that is part of the premium sound package. It is located at the top center of the dash in a 5x8 cutout. The stock radio has a low power (3 Watt) amp that drives the higher power bridged (12 Watt) amp. Your new radio already has a high power bridged amp that can not directly drive the premium sound amp.

There are two solutions to this problem. You can bypass the premium sound amp and connect your new radio directly to the speakers. This is the best way to go if you will not be putting the stock radio back in the car. The other option is to use a floating ground adaper so that the new radio can drive the factory amp. This is best if you want to sell the car with the stock radio.

A floating ground adapter simply removes the DC offset that is present on the output of a high power bridged amp. This is done with a capacitor. Anything in the range of 1000 to 4700 will work fine. To minimize turn on pops there should be a resistor to ground. Anything in the range of 22 to 47 ohm will be fine. Make sure it is at least 1/2 Watt. Only the positive (+) speaker output will be used. The negative (-) is not used and must be insulated so it will not short out.

Schematic attached.
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Old 2nd April 2006, 07:26 AM   #3
geek883 is offline geek883  United States
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Thank you, that's exactly the info I needed. I'll probably just bypass the factory stuff and run new speaker wires. Thanks again for the help... I love this forum and appreciate the shared knowledge.
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