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Old 13th September 2004, 09:54 PM   #1
mux is offline mux  United States
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Default Smoked CD Changer

Today I was hooking up my stereo in my party bus and I accidently applied 24 volts to it. The fuse in the head unit did not blow, but my changer started smoking. Now when I hook it up it powers up and everything, but my head unit does not see that it is conncted. I checked the able and everything is good there. I opened up the changer and everything looks alright. I do not see any burnt chips or anything. Anyone have any ideas?
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Old 14th September 2004, 02:46 AM   #2
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Do you mean ideas other than "It's fried?"

Smoke coming from electronics is hardly ever a good thing.

As we all know, microchips run on magic smoke. If you do something that they don't like, the magic smoke gets out, and the chip doesn't work anymore. Sounds like you let out the magic smoke.

If I had to guess, I'd say that the damaged component will be the processor in the changer. That's the one that "talks" to the head unit, responds to commands, and controls the changer. This part is likely to cost a large amount of the new cost of a replacement changer. If it's under warranty, you might try getting it replaced or repaired under warranty, but do NOT tell them about the 24V thing, or they're just gonna laugh at you. It is also possible that more than one component is cooked.
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Old 14th September 2004, 02:56 AM   #3
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Duuuuuuuuuuuuuude -- where did you get 24V in an automotive application?
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Old 14th September 2004, 03:42 AM   #4
imix500 is offline imix500  United States
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Large commercial vehicles including semi tractors and buses use a 24v electrical system.
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Old 14th September 2004, 12:29 PM   #5
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well, you learn something new every day !

i anxiously await the 48V systems in autos -- this should make for some interesting developments out of Delphi.
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Old 14th September 2004, 04:29 PM   #6
mux is offline mux  United States
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Quote:
Originally posted by SupraGuy
Do you mean ideas other than "It's fried?"

Smoke coming from electronics is hardly ever a good thing.

As we all know, microchips run on magic smoke. If you do something that they don't like, the magic smoke gets out, and the chip doesn't work anymore. Sounds like you let out the magic smoke.

If I had to guess, I'd say that the damaged component will be the processor in the changer. That's the one that "talks" to the head unit, responds to commands, and controls the changer. This part is likely to cost a large amount of the new cost of a replacement changer. If it's under warranty, you might try getting it replaced or repaired under warranty, but do NOT tell them about the 24V thing, or they're just gonna laugh at you. It is also possible that more than one component is cooked.
Well I guess I was lucky enough to get the magic smoke replaced. It was a blown cap and a dead diode.
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Old 15th September 2004, 02:55 AM   #7
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Then you were lucky. The cap probably blew (Big pop) when the diode allowed reverse voltage across it. The diode would be the source of the smoke. (Replacement diode has replacement smoke. )
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Old 16th September 2004, 10:33 PM   #8
mux is offline mux  United States
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Actually the smoke was from the cap. There was no reverse voltage. The cap blew because it was only rated 16 volts. Everyting else goes on amps and that is why the fuse never blew it was actually low amps so everyything was fine.
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