diyAudio

diyAudio (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/)
-   Car Audio (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/car-audio/)
-   -   Can I use regular stereo speakers for car audio? (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/car-audio/167434-can-i-use-regular-stereo-speakers-car-audio.html)

Racket Scientist 25th May 2010 03:22 AM

Can I use regular stereo speakers for car audio?
 
I'm confused. I've been told in one place that its okay to use home audio drivers in car installations, and in another place that they won't stand up to the temperature extremes. I understand that there are differences based on off axis response as well, but my basic question is, can I use home speakers in the car and expect them to last? I much prefer the prices and specs of most home audio drivers, and I have a hard time making sense of using multiple triaxial drivers shooting off axis in all kinds of directions - I'm a simple man.

ppia600 25th May 2010 03:35 AM

A home driver with a paper cone will not hold up well if it doesn't have a durable coating. It can warp and cause sq issues. I'm sure there are models with poly or similar cones and better foam or rubber surrounds. Also depends on the surround glue used, I actually bought set of poly home drivers with rubber surrounds and the glue eventually seperated from the humidity lol.

FireII 25th May 2010 03:40 AM

There are some home audio speakers that you can use for car audio, brands include, vifa, Seas, Scanspeak, and a several of others. For information on this there is a great site(well, it used to be REALLY great) www.diyma.com

Racket Scientist 26th May 2010 02:42 AM

I talked with one of the tech line guys at Parts Express and his opinion is that home audio speakers are generally fine for car audio.

Glowbug 26th May 2010 03:28 PM

Nothing wrong with using paper cone drivers in a vehicle. I've seen many installs with Vifa paper cones with nothing else applied that have lasted a long time :)

tsmith1315 27th May 2010 04:41 PM

I've used my share of home audio drivers over the years with no issues. I don't do much car audio anymore, but I use home drivers when I do.

Use common sense. If you're putting them into the doors and see traces of trapped moisture or obvious water stains, don't use paper cones. Be sure the drain holes in the bottom of the door are open so that water can get out. If the mounting surface isn't nice and flat, don't use drivers with plastic baskets. Etc.

I've seen glue fail as well, but not consistent or often enough to draw a conclusion.

BTW -if you can box in the drivers reasonably... it may be a pain, but the performance gain will be worth your time.

Racket Scientist 29th May 2010 03:53 PM

To my mind, if you have tweeters up near the dash, it makes no sense to have coaxial speakers in the doors - you then have 4 sources for the highs. To me it makes more sense to have higher quality dedicated mid/bass drivers in the doors and roll them off at a crossover point to the tweeters. Is there some reason we have few choices other than coaxial dual (or tri way) speakers for doors?

Cal Weldon 29th May 2010 05:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Racket Scientist (Post 2201796)
Is there some reason we have few choices other than coaxial dual (or tri way) speakers for doors?

Yes. Full range don't look cool and you can't sell them for near as much.

KevinLee 29th May 2010 05:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Racket Scientist (Post 2197633)
I'm confused. I've been told in one place that its okay to use home audio drivers in car installations, and in another place that they won't stand up to the temperature extremes. I understand that there are differences based on off axis response as well, but my basic question is, can I use home speakers in the car and expect them to last? I much prefer the prices and specs of most home audio drivers, and I have a hard time making sense of using multiple triaxial drivers shooting off axis in all kinds of directions - I'm a simple man.

No one has stated it yet, but the impedance of home speakers is typically 6-8 ohm and car speakers 4 ohm. The amplifiers and CD players in cars are typically optimized for 4 ohm loads (subwoofer amps 2 ohm or 1 ohm). Depending on how many drivers you are going to use, you can series/parallel to get different impedences.

ppia600 30th May 2010 04:56 AM

/\ another consideration


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:12 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio


Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2