Is there a way to reduce brightness of a speaker - diyAudio
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Old 15th October 2007, 12:50 AM   #1
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Default Is there a way to reduce brightness of a speaker

I have a set of Soundstream 6x9's I just installed running off an MTX 4244 4 channel amp bridged stereo. They are 120w speakers. They are just too bright for my tastes. Is there anything I can do to tame the tweeters a little bit? They are extremly lound and sound good just too bright and I already have the tone control down a little from 0. I don't want to just turn down the tone because it affects the front separates as well and they sound good where they are. Can I put a cap or something just on the tweeters of the 6x9's? Or fatten the drivers up some to counter the brightness.

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Old 15th October 2007, 10:20 AM   #2
jnb is offline jnb  Australia
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If the tweeter has a cap on it already, you may be able to replace it with a smaller cap. This may not be the technically perfect answer but I think it would achieve what you are asking. This could also be done by adding a small resistor in series but try the capacitor first IMO.... the effect is different.

If the tweeter does not have a cap, it may be a piezo tweeter. Adding a cap will also work but in a different way. You would want to measure the tweeter with a capacitance meter first, then add a capacitance in series that is (for starters) maybe twice that value.
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Old 20th October 2007, 08:16 AM   #3
spsfahy is offline spsfahy  United States
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Have you tried using a non-polar capacitor in parallel with your speaker?
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Old 20th October 2007, 11:43 AM   #4
Clipped is offline Clipped  Thailand
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the higher you go in capacitor value the less harsh it will be

try 4.7uf, 5.5 uf, 6.7uf non polar...those yellow ones...that look like they have wax on the ends
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Old 20th October 2007, 05:05 PM   #5
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Default Turn the darkness up!

Really, is it possible to disconnect the tweaters leads that connect to the woofer leads and go bi-amp? I used a 4 channel amp to do this, it helps when dialing in a xover frequency also gains can be upped or downed to blend better. If your going to mess with the caps maybe going bi-amped would be preferable.

L-pads could be installed if your going to take a soldering iron to them. Might be a better bet than taking away the xover set by the caps???

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Old 20th October 2007, 05:05 PM   #6
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Default See here

Poo Poo Tweeters

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Old 20th October 2007, 05:43 PM   #7
Glowbug is offline Glowbug  United States
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Go with speakers that have silk dome tweeters

Some people just don't like metal domes...I'm one of them - my Memphis MYSNCs have metal domes that are manageable with EQing, but there's nothing quite like a smooth silk dome...
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Old 20th October 2007, 10:23 PM   #8
jnb is offline jnb  Australia
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Quote:
Originally posted by spsfahy
Have you tried using a non-polar capacitor in parallel with your speaker?
Hi spsfahy,

A tweeter series resistor is a must with this one, otherwise the impedance will drop near zero at high frequencies.

The capacitor should not be put across the amp.
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Old 21st October 2007, 12:21 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally posted by spsfahy
Have you tried using a non-polar capacitor in parallel with your speaker?

As mentioned above this is not the way to go, things need to be done properly.....
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Old 21st October 2007, 06:42 AM   #10
Clipped is offline Clipped  Thailand
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just change the capacitor or cut the wire too it...there will be no drastic effects...ive been doing it for years...

just make sure its atleats 50volts...

or just put a piece of cloth over it...
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