Calculate litrage litres of an angled box - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > General Interest > Car Audio

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 8th October 2007, 02:41 PM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Default Calculate litrage litres of an angled box

Please forgive me for this seemingly unintelligent question but I was perfecting my cartoon drawing skills during high school mathematics class.

I have been told that an angled box is good for a sub as it reduces the direct back pressure. This is apparently more of an issue when the box is smaller than the optimal box size.

I have a 15" DVC Option Audio subwoofer as can be viewed here .

I have been told that it should go into a 61L sealed box for optimal response. After being quoted $300+ for a custom box I sought out to get a pre-fabricated box.

I am looking at this item in eBay but I have a few questions:
  • How do I calculate the approximate litres of this box given the angled slopes? I know there's a minimum of 43L in the rectangular part
  • Will the inferior wood cause any loss of performance? If so, what does that translate to in measurable terms (non audiophile)?
  • What does the angled box do sonically different to a rectangular box?

Personally I favour smoother frequencies with ultra low bass and plenty of space between frequency bands.

Thanks in advance
~groover
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th October 2007, 02:52 PM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: sk
Send a message via AIM to ocool_15 Send a message via Yahoo to ocool_15
You break the box into seperate sections. The box is a rectangle, with 2 triangles on top. You should minus the thickness of the wood from the outer edges also. For this application the angled box will not make any difference.

Quote:
...with ultra low bass and plenty of space between frequency bands.
Your statment makes no sense could you rephrase?
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th October 2007, 03:31 PM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
jan.didden's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Great City of Turnhout, Belgium
Blog Entries: 7
An angled box doesn't reduce the back pressure, but it spreads the standing waves over a broader freq range. In a rect box, when the inside box dimensions are equal to half the sound wavelength, you get standing waves. With the angles, you like have many small standing waves all of slightly different freqs.

But as noted above, at LF the wavelengths are so large that they are always (much) larger than the internal dimensions anyway, so the angles don't make a difference.

Edit: I believe 'litrage' is commonly called 'volume' in English

Jan Didden
__________________
I won't make the tactical error to try to dislodge with rational arguments a conviction that is beyond reason - Daniel Dennett
Check out Linear Audio Vol 7!
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th October 2007, 03:42 PM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Quote:
The box is a rectangle, with 2 triangles on top
Yes, I noticed this however is it possible to calculate the top 2 triangles volume without knowing the angles? Can this be approximated in any way?

Quote:
Your statment makes no sense could you rephrase?
Sorry, I want a bass response that is deep and not too compressed. The 6x9s in the back parcel tray provide clear and distinct mid-bass so the subs purpose is to provide the deeper tones such as 45hz.

I would be most likely be applying a low pass filter that leaves a gap from where the 6x9s roll off.

I like to listen to downtempo styles of music whilst driving. This music often skips large 'chunks' of frequencies offering more at the extreme low and the extreme high. A well mastered piece will often have your mind hearing the in between frequencies without them being present or requiring much of the tracks available amplitude.
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th October 2007, 03:53 PM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
jan.didden's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Great City of Turnhout, Belgium
Blog Entries: 7
Quote:
Originally posted by groover1234
Yes, I noticed this however is it possible to calculate the top 2 triangles volume without knowing the angles? Can this be approximated in any way?[snip]

If the triangles are equal, you can put them (in your mind) together so they form a rectangle. Then it's just the product of the sides of course. If they are not equal, you can pretend each consists of two equals, calculate the volume, and divide by two, for each triangle.

Jan Didden
__________________
I won't make the tactical error to try to dislodge with rational arguments a conviction that is beyond reason - Daniel Dennett
Check out Linear Audio Vol 7!
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th October 2007, 04:03 PM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Quote:
I believe 'litrage' is commonly called 'volume' in English
haha so it is... please excuse my late night literacy skills.

Quote:
at LF the wavelengths are so large that they are always (much) larger than the internal dimensions
In which case, assuming the wavelength at 45hz would be in excess of 7 metres, how then would any box size effect the output of the speaker apart from the amount of compression and possibly a cumulative increase in pressure? or have I misunderstood you.

Bracing myself...I don't claim to know anything so please be gentle
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th October 2007, 04:03 PM   #7
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
haha so bleeding obvious! thank you janneman.

Please excuse me whilst I go beat my chest and forage for food...
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th October 2007, 04:05 PM   #8
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Oh and if someone could please comment on

Quote:
Will the inferior wood cause any loss of performance? If so, what does that translate to in measurable terms (non audiophile)?
Thanks
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th October 2007, 05:13 PM   #9
ppia600 is offline ppia600  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Louis y ana
Just use some acoustic mat on the inside if you're worried about that. You could glue some 3/4 inch carpet underlayment to the walls, for example. You know, that recycled foam mat they use under home carpeting. They sell it at hardware stores by the square yard. You can also find acoustic foam similar to the stuff they use in record studio walls but with trianglular projections and glue it to the walls. I think parts express or mcm sells the stuff
__________________
Don't worry... you can always turn the gain down!
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th October 2007, 05:20 PM   #10
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Quote:
Just use some acoustic mat on the inside
so there is no real need to use super thick MDF apart from durability?
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
XLS 12 sub in 50 litres / 26Hz + 200W BK amp - any better suggestions for ~250? alexclaber Subwoofers 5 21st December 2007 06:50 PM
litres to box size damianl Multi-Way 30 7th September 2007 10:40 AM
If I use 1g dammping fill Vb1= Vb - xx litres DariusM Multi-Way 3 13th December 2005 08:08 PM
The 55 Litres challenge !!! richardkrol Subwoofers 7 10th March 2004 11:21 PM
Are angled braces necessary? PWatts Multi-Way 5 17th July 2003 10:58 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 06:49 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2