PPI 2150 AM Dead! Need help or good repair person! - Page 3 - diyAudio
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Old 4th November 2007, 06:43 AM   #21
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Remember... you can't power up this amp without the bottom cover in place. If you do, it can fail within seconds.
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Old 4th November 2007, 06:49 AM   #22
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Yes, this I do know. Read that in a couple of other repair threads. Thanks for the heads-up, though. I may end up building some sort of frame that can be screwed down independent of the bottom plate, as I've seen pictures of in some other thread on here (might've even been you that posted 'em?), but for the immediate future will at least make sure the bottom cover is nice & tight.

Once again, thanks...

Pyro
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Old 4th November 2007, 12:47 PM   #23
ppia600 is offline ppia600  United States
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I'd like to see pics of the repair work. Curious as to what he did with the metal strips. He was probably just trying to make sure the transistors stayed pressed against the sink. I don't really like this system ppi used to hold them down, the bottom screws strip easily, especially after pulling the cover a few times. (But I guess if the amp is working properly there's no need for that) I actually took care of this problem with an art600 I had a few years back by drilling the holes completely through the sink. Then I made counter sunk holes in the top of the amp for the bolt heads. Next I cut the bolts to just a little shorter than the amp height and used self locking nuts on the bottom. It actually looked very nice after I removed the white powder coat (kind of scratched up) and polished the aluminum to a nice shine.
Sorry you've had to go through so much to enjoy the amp again. It will be worth it though, those amps are great. I've got the same amp sitting in my storage room. One of my friends is supposed to buy it, if not it will be up on ebay in a few weeks.
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Old 4th November 2007, 05:14 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally posted by ppia600
I'd like to see pics of the repair work. Curious as to what he did with the metal strips. He was probably just trying to make sure the transistors stayed pressed against the sink.

Perhaps, but on top of adhesive-backed foam strips that were stuck to the transistors?? Seems a bit counter-productive for heat dissipation to me. Plus, there was no reason to replace the screws...especially with the ones he chose to replace them with! Note the copious amounts of solder used and the poor alignment or the transistors that were replaced. I know the alignment & spacing probably makes no difference in performance, I just think it's a sloppy job. Certainly not what I would call "quality" work. Also not a huge deal that he soldered wires onto the back of the output connector, since he didn't have a PPI output plug to use to test the amp...but I was the one who had to remove these wires!! If I hadn't, whatever I couldn't have cut off from the outside would still be almost sticking out of where the connector plugs in.

If it weren't for the helpful people on this forum, I more than likely would have reinstalled my amp again, only to have it fail a third time...after which I would have had to seek out someone else here in town to try fixing it again (at additional expense) or just put it in a closet somewhere in hopes of finding a working one that I could afford on eBay.

But even after all of this, I will say that there were a few things good to come of the whole thing. I learned a little bit more about the inner workings of car amplifiers, and will soon have this puppy working like it used to once again. As juvenile as it sounds, I had forgotten how much fun it can be to drive through a parking garage or crowded parking lot with my BachBusters CD cranked and see how many cheap car alarms start goin' off!!

I know, I know...I'll grow up later, LOL!

Hope these pics are big enough to show the details I'm trying to show. Had to down-size them in order to post 'em.

Pyro
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Old 4th November 2007, 05:31 PM   #25
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Hmm...can't seem to post more than one attachment per post. Ok, hopefully it's not unacceptable to post them like this:

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

Geez...looks like only two per post.

One more post coming...
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Old 4th November 2007, 05:41 PM   #26
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Arrrrgghh...don't know why the last two won't show up in the post window, so they're attachments on this one and the previous one.

Nice, huh?

Pyro
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Old 4th November 2007, 09:15 PM   #27
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Well, the closest I could come to 1/4 Watt, 100 Ohm, 5% tolerance were these two:

1/2 Watt, 100 Ohm, 5% tolerance

and

1/4 Watt, 110 Ohm, 2% tolerance



If memory serves, I'm thinking the 1/2 Watt ones would be acceptable...but wanted to ask the experts before committing to them. If these must be exactly 1/4 Watt, 100 Ohm at 5% tolerance, I guess I'll order them (I kinda would like to get some fresh mica insulation stuff as long as I have the amp all apart anyway). Digikey usually ships pretty quickly...

So would the 1/2 Watt ones make a dangerous enough difference to need to order some 1/4 Watt ones? And does anyone know if Digikey, or perhaps Moeseur (sp?) sell the mica stuff?

Thanks in advance,

Pyro
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Old 4th November 2007, 09:27 PM   #28
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PyroZona:
The wattage isn't critical. The larger size won't fit into the alloted space so you'll have to stand them up.

Mouser has the insulators but not in the long strips. You'll have to buy individual TO-220 insulators.

Is one of the insulators damaged?

ppia600:
If you have another one with stripped holes, email me. You don't have to drill all of the way through to repair the sink.
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Old 4th November 2007, 11:40 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally posted by Perry Babin
PyroZona:

Mouser has the insulators but not in the long strips. You'll have to buy individual TO-220 insulators.

Is one of the insulators damaged?

Well, I'm not really sure. When I was pulling them out of the thermal grease, it seemed like there were 2 layers to one or two of the mica strips...but one of the layers of each of those was much thinner and pretty much came apart, much like celophane would if you left it out in the sun for a year or two (I guess). Also, in the spots where the transistors that grenaded themselves were, there are darkened, burnt spots that still smell like burnt electronics. I'd like to replace them all just cause I have it all apart...kinda like I would likely replace my valve cover gasket on my Jeep's engine if I had to remove the valve cover to repair something under it. I'm just a "as long as I'm doin' it..." kinda guy.

Pyro
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Old 5th November 2007, 12:25 AM   #30
ppia600 is offline ppia600  United States
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Yeah, that does looke kind of rushed/sloppy (the pic with the cap mainly), but as long as the legs aren't touching anything they shouldn't be, and if the solder is a clean connection, it should be ok. It almost looks like he just added the metal strip and the foam to make the bottom cover press harder. He could have just bent the metal cover legs slowly back into place to make sure they are holding the transistors securely.
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