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Rebuilding a Hafler DH200 Part 2

Posted 16th April 2013 at 09:57 PM by Stormrider

Where was I? Right, back to the workshop and cue the music.

Sorry in advance for my photos. They get the job done, but some of them look pretty bad now. I'd retake them but the amp has long since been returned to it's owner.

Once both channels were running happily with their new parts on the benchtop power supply I turned my limited attention to the chassis. The phenolic insulators sandwiching the RCA jacks in place were starting to crumble so, some shiny new jacks were fitted courtesy of ApexJr.com for 99 cents. The input wiring was done with 22AWG shielded wire.

Click the image to open in full size.

The pro Hafler models like the P125 and the P230 have a solid aluminum bracket for the ground connections between the main power supply caps. The DH200 and DH220 models only got some tinned wire which isn't very convenient or nice looking. I fashioned up a new bracket with some scrap...
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Rating: 4 votes, 4.75 average.

GB F5 Guide (pcb version 2)

Posted 3rd February 2010 at 01:17 AM by cviller
Updated 14th February 2013 at 07:14 PM by cviller

As promised, I would make a guide to the boards and in particular to the additions I have made to the F5. I decided to do this in the blog, because then you can give me comments which I can use for improving the doc. However I'm not done at all, but I thought it would be nice to give you access to the BOM I have made.

IMPORTANT: Before you start stuffing your boards, you must read the manual/article written by Nelson Pass – available for download on the First Watt website (First Watt: Products: F5).

Detailed guide by Steve and Matt: http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/pass-...mentation.html

PCB
Here is a picture of the pcb.
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There are no more boards available, but you can order F5 boards on the diyAudio store.


Schematics
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Optionality
With the addition of optional extra output mosfets and cascoding, there are...
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File Type: pdf bom.pdf (50.9 KB, 4943 views)
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Rating: 3 votes, 4.67 average.

Tech note: Balanced lines-1

Posted 13th January 2010 at 05:54 PM by jan.didden
Updated 13th January 2010 at 05:57 PM by jan.didden

Why would one use balanced interconnects, and how can we make them work well?

Balanced lines came about at a time where very long signal lines were coming in use for telephone and later for large audio performance venues. If you use a single screened line for your signal, and the line is long, the ground current through the screen causes a voltage between the ground points of the cable ends. Since the signal send out (and received) is the difference between the voltage on the signal wire and the ground wire, the unwanted signal (noise, hum) is effectively added to the wanted (music) signal. We don’t want that.

The trick is to use TWO signal lines in parallel. You send the signal over the two lines in such a way that the signal you want to transmit is the difference between the signals on these two wires, and then at the receiving end you have an amp that reacts to the difference between the two lines, so your signal at the far end is the difference between...
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Rating: 3 votes, 4.67 average.

Feedback, or how to be late and be on time the same time, all the time.

Posted 3rd November 2010 at 05:19 AM by jan.didden
Updated 3rd November 2010 at 10:20 AM by jan.didden

Just a couple of days ago I posted something to try to debunk that tired old myth that 'feedback always comes too late and therefor can't work'. Apart from the fact that obviously it does work, which makes the first statement pretty stupid to begin with, here's my take on it.

The myth may result from an often repeated misconception that feedback comes 'after the fact' and therefore always comes too late.
This has been shown to not be the case over and over again but if you have no engineering background it may be difficult to grasp the concept. Let me try to help.

Obviously, there is a signal delay in an amp from input to output and back to the input through the feedback loop. Since the feedback loop is generally a pair of resistors, the bulk of the delay is in the amp. That is the case both in non-feedback as well as in feedback amps. Such delays are very small, often fractions of a microsecond, and in this context can be ignored.

What...
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Cathode Follower

Posted 14th May 2010 at 11:40 PM by Miles Prower

AC Coupled CF

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In this schemo, Rk is the normal cathode bias resistor. Rl represents the tail load in parallel with the load impedance. Rg is the control grid DC return. The CF gives excellent high frequency performance since Miller Effect is absent, and the Cgk sees very little current since the grid and cathode are always at nearly the same potential. This makes the Cgk effectively smaller than its static value. The main component of input capacitance will be the reverse transfer capacitance: Cgp. With small signal triodes, it is easy to present a Hi-Z, Lo-C load to the driving stage. This isn't just helpful at RF.

This is another circuit which has lately come under unjustified criticism within certain audiophile circles. Much of this is unjustified on the basis that the CF is a negative feedback circuit. This view that all NFB is all bad does have a basis in fact. It has...
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Rating: 2 votes, 4.50 average.

First Watt F5 Amp build

Posted 27th January 2012 at 01:53 PM by dvb projekt
Updated 8th January 2014 at 07:17 PM by dvb projekt (Project finished)

After reading so much over this amp, i will start a new project for my Hornspeaker

Let´s see if the F5 can play in the same league as my 300B mono´s



The parts


Click the image to open in full size.

Schaffner FN 2070 - 3A multistage EMI Filter



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Antek AS-4218 - 400VA transformer



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SST03 Softstart module from Sjostrom Audio
Design without extra transformer


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RFB03 rectifier bridge from Sjostrom Audio

Click the image to open in full size.

with IXYS DPG 60 C 200 HB HiPerFRED diodes



...
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File Type: zip Front- & Backpanel .fpd files.zip (4.2 KB, 49 views)
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Tech note: voltage regulators-1

Posted 7th January 2010 at 05:10 PM by jan.didden
Updated 11th February 2010 at 03:31 AM by Jason

There are lots of types of voltage regulators, but in this installment I’ll talk about series regulators.

What’s a regulator? It’s all in the name: it REGULATES the voltage to the circuit to be powered to keep it constant and as free of noise and ripple as practical. The ‘regulation’ means that there is some circuitry that compares a reference voltage, like from a zener diode, to the regulated output voltage, and then uses the difference between the two to adjust another element to null that difference. The ‘compare-and-correct’ is crucial for a regulator, and is done by negative feedback….

Look at Fig 1: is there a regulator in there? No, they are all circuits that try to give a constant, ripple free voltage, but if you start to draw varying currents from them, the output will vary with that current and there is no mechanism that somehow tries to null out that variation. Fig 1c is better than 1b, because Q1 buffers the voltage from the zener reference, so...
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DAC End 2

Posted 29th March 2010 at 01:33 AM by quanghao
Updated 29th March 2010 at 02:16 AM by quanghao

INTRODUCTION

After the good result obtain with the DAC End I have design with Nguyen Quang Hao a set of boards to create a cheaper project with a sonic performances very near.

The No Oversampling DAC give a more natural sound but if you ear the TDA1541 and TDA1543 seem to lose details.

The AD1865N-K with passive I/V give a perfect combination, natural sound and all the details.

The AD1865N-K give the better performances with a 200ohm MK132 Caddock as passive I/V.

In this configuration the output signal is too low to drive any amplifier so I have design for the AD1865N-K the better output stage.

This DAC use a single ended vacuum tube amplifier without the expensive output transformers used in my original DAC End.

The DAC board follows the original design but has been inserted a jump to switch the phase of output signal.

In any vacuum tube stage the signal on the anode is in out phase...
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TDA1541A DAC Module V3.0 - Out of production

Posted 20th August 2011 at 08:32 AM by dvb projekt
Updated 19th June 2013 at 10:27 AM by dvb projekt

The Red Baron

aka TDA1541A DAC V3.0


Click the image to open in full size.


The evolution brings the following changes

- Direct shunt voltage inputs with shortest onboard traces
- I2S In-/Outputs with shortest onboard traces
- Upgrades DEM Synchronizer
- Onboard Grounded-Gate MOSFET Current Buffer I/V Stage
(-ecdesigns- MK7 version)
- Compacter design


Still on the module

- Separate GND-Trace for DEM-Synchroinizer
- Master/Slave connectors for parallel DAC module usage
and external I/V Buffer stages e.g.
Tube-I-zator & DDNF Stage
- Groundplane
- no SMD Design


Click the image to open in full size.


The PCB has the following data:

Material: FR4 - 2mm
Layers: 2
Board size: 125x73 mm
...
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File Type: pdf The Red Baron DAC.pdf (28.9 KB, 1665 views)
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2013 Holiday Projects - Ridding the system of resistor problems

Posted 30th December 2013 at 03:35 AM by wlowes
Updated Yesterday at 01:10 AM by wlowes (add pic)

Two months ago I had great ambitions to complete a long in the planning short on execution music server by xmas. Seems I am too busy and just having too much fun listening to my system to make progress on big projects.

However, in a very low key way my system has made some stunning gains over the 2013 holiday.

My happy 6 year journey with a Lightspeed linestage finally ran afoul when an LDR packed it in. I retooled with some on hand bits while waiting for new LDRs to arrive. A snaffu with my order delayed that whole process. Meanwhile, my wonderful wife asked me what I wanted for xmas. I had been reading Arthur Salvatore's site and became interested in using an autoformer from Dave Slagle for my linestage. If your read the reviews and the technical specs, its intriguing. My system is perfect for passive. I only listen to a music server with triode ouput stage, short interconnects to OTL amps and overall have lots of gain.

On a whim...
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