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Old 27th March 2006, 09:21 PM   #11
karma is offline karma  Canada
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There are only 100uF caps beside the chips, the ones at the rectifiers are 1000uF

i tryed that with my lm4780 chipamp i was happy with the sound
lots of power. before i changed it again
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Old 27th March 2006, 10:57 PM   #12
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Bronze heatsink debate is now here

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Old 27th March 2006, 11:06 PM   #13
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Peter, I'm curious about the wire you've used. The power and ground wires look like fairly light gauge (#22?) solid hookup wire. Is that what you normally use?
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Old 27th March 2006, 11:09 PM   #14
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I alwyas use Cardas chassis wire, 19.5ga, for power connections. To me, that wire sounds the best in that application. The connection to binding posts is made with DH Labs hook up wire and signal wire is DH Labs solid core, 26ga silver. I'm not sure about the choices here yet.
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Old 28th March 2006, 03:16 AM   #15
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Peter,

I foresee your integrated amp being a big hit and an amazing performer! Looks very, very promising!

The thick wood is very classy.

How would you say the bronze heatsink compares with copper or aluminum sonically? I understand there's some sort of debate over the use of bronze - I haven't read the thread yet, but I know there's some connection to the C37 theory as posited by Deiter Ennemoser. I haven't tried the bronze in anything, but the C37 lacquer was miraculous on my Lowther drivers. Big thumbs up.

Is there any problem with the switching motor interfering with the TVCs?

Best,
KT
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Old 28th March 2006, 05:07 AM   #16
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I'm not getting any interferences from the motor, the control circuit is isolated by using separate PS. While turning, the mechanism make nice clicking and definitely isn't of a quiet type.

Comparison between all those heatsinks isn't certainly an easy one. Maybe you remember that my first monoblock amp was using large copper piece acting as heatsink and structural bar. Initially, I liked the sound, but after CES, we came to conlusion that the air was somewhat missing in that amp. I was also using a clamping bar to attach the chip to the heatsink. After removing that calmp and replacing it with a regular screw things improved, but eventually we decided for aluminum heatsink as it provided more air extention, with copper it was a bit less. Those are not only my observations, but also from the people who worked with me while developing the amp.

I later built the first Patek using bronze and I found that that material provided nicely balanced sound: it was less zingy and harsh than aluminum, but didn't damp higher frequencies as much as copper. It seemed that the sound gained more refinement as well.

Brass also worked well, but somehow I didn't feel convinced about using it, I'm not sure why, maybe because of the qualities of the metal iself.

The amount of damping and air extention will depend on the mass of the heatsink and cannot be easily estimated untill tried in an actual design. It will also depend how the hetasink is attached and supported.

Also, with such small amps, I prefer some weight, so usually aluminum is out of question as it's not heavy enough. Bronze is too expensive and I can only have it in the amps for my personal use. Brass is rather hard to work with, so the only reasonable choice is copper. When used in smaller sizes, it's almost as good as bronze.
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Old 28th March 2006, 02:18 PM   #17
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Thank you for finding a use for my old cracked drumset cymbals, all bronze and now about to melted down into heatsinks(as soon as I educate myself about the probably hazardous process!) I have built the 3875 kit and am floored by the quality of sound.
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Old 28th March 2006, 05:43 PM   #18
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Peter,

Again a creation of art! I do wonder if you have an explanation for the difference in sound when using different heatsink materials. After all it is only meant to dissipate some (not even that much) heat? Can you hypothesize why this apparent sonic difference might occur?
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Old 29th March 2006, 12:41 PM   #19
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Microphonics and vibrational properties maybe?

Have you tried annealing the copper to make it softer?

Bronze is much harder than copper, and church-bell bronze is alot harder than most other bronze alloys, a friend of mine got some of it from a bell maker. Allmost impossible to work with ordinary tools. It rings like a ,ahem,, a bell when you tap it with a hammer , much lower damping than other alloys.

BTW, cool design

Regards,
Peter
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Old 29th March 2006, 12:53 PM   #20
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Another idea for heatsinks.

Tin and zinc are have high damping properties, something to try?

I see you have some kind of plastic (PE?) to mount the caps in your amp, what about using wood instead? Would it make any difference?

Regards,
Peter
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