Go Back   Home > Forums > Commercial Sector > Vendor Forums > Audio Sector

Audio Sector Kits & PC boards from AudioSector

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 5th July 2008, 02:19 PM   #151
Vautrin is offline Vautrin  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Thanks, Peter! That was superfast. So mine was there the whole time. Figures.


David in SW FL
  Reply With Quote
Old 5th July 2008, 02:26 PM   #152
diyAudio Member
 
Peter Daniel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Toronto, Canada
Send a message via AIM to Peter Daniel
Quote:
Originally posted by Vautrin
I have a PSU question, too. I chose to power two amp boards in stereo config with one Avel 250VA 25V-25V toroid in a separate cabinet. Is it best to also house the rectifier board with the toroid? Or should I put it close to the amp boards as demonstrated here? What are the pros/cons of each?

Also, if I house the rectifier board with the toroid, how many wires do I need in my umbilical (at least four, of course)? I see your elegant Patek arrangement showing only four wires in two photos, whereas the example integrated amp in this tutorial shows two grounds to the star and four other wires to the boards.
If amp and PS are in separate enclosures, I would suggest to place rectifiers with the transformer, that way you will have only DC in the amp. This may not be really critical, as I've built amps with rectifiers right beside the chip (see below) and they performed well, but placing the diodes in a PS enclosure is a common practice.

Click the image to open in full size.

There are 4 wires in the umbilical: V+, V- and two grounds separate for each rail. While the example integrated amp had separate power wires for each channel (that's why you see 6) the Patek has power wires run from one channel to another channel (board).

Click the image to open in full size.
__________________
www.audiosector.com
“Do something really well. See how much time it takes. It might be a product, a work of art, who knows? Then give it away cheaply, just because you feel that it should not cost so much, even if it took a lot of time and expensive materials to make it.” - JC
  Reply With Quote
Old 5th July 2008, 02:27 PM   #153
Vautrin is offline Vautrin  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
The fuses would be on the DC side, between the rectifier board and the amps. (per Nuuk)
  Reply With Quote
Old 5th July 2008, 02:36 PM   #154
Vautrin is offline Vautrin  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Eureka! It all just finally 'clicked'.

My God, this is the fastest, most thorough and informative response I've received in my two decades on internet . Thanks again, Peter. This project is the most fun and stimulating thing I've done in years.


David in SW FL (Venice - "God's Waiting Room")
  Reply With Quote
Old 5th July 2008, 02:37 PM   #155
diyAudio Member
 
Peter Daniel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Toronto, Canada
Send a message via AIM to Peter Daniel
Quote:
Originally posted by Vautrin
The fuses would be on the DC side, between the rectifier board and the amps. (per Nuuk)
I'm always against placing fuses on the DC side, because if one fuse fails, you will have DC voltage at your speaker, as mentioned here: http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/showt...03#post1521403

This may inevitably damage your woofers. It is OK for testing, but not with your speakers connected.

To be honest, I never used light bulb method myself, I always use Variac to bring the voltage slowly up: http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/showt...t=#post1518281

If you didn't make any mistakes while assembling the boards, there is a great chance everything will work fine right from a start. Make sure that power wires are not mixed up and always wear safety glasses: they will protect your eyes in case components suddenly explode (like improperly mounted electrolytics).
__________________
www.audiosector.com
“Do something really well. See how much time it takes. It might be a product, a work of art, who knows? Then give it away cheaply, just because you feel that it should not cost so much, even if it took a lot of time and expensive materials to make it.” - JC
  Reply With Quote
Old 5th July 2008, 02:59 PM   #156
Vautrin is offline Vautrin  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
"I'm always against placing fuses on the DC side, because if one fuse fails, you will have DC voltage at your speaker..."

Makes sense. I'll nix the fuses and borrow (or buy) a variac.

"If you didn't make any error while assembling the board, there is a great chance that everything will work fine right from a start."

I meticulously soldered under the stereomicroscope I use for stone setting/engraving so I'm pretty sure everything's ready for the electrons. And you can be sure what's left of my presbyopic & diabetic eyes will be well-protected. Thank you for your concern. Safety is part of the system.


David in Venice, FL
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th July 2008, 09:01 PM   #157
Vautrin is offline Vautrin  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Because I cannot yet begin a new thread, I'll post here (with any due nonsequiterization apologies frontloaded).

Finished the Audiosector LM3875 Classic kit last evening and couldn't be happier. It powered perfectly and silently (no hum, no thump, nothing), testing well within range for both channels and handling its first CD ( Oscar Peterson at the Blue Note) so cleanly and musically I was stunned. Fast and sensitive. Pure, but not cold. The piano sounded like, well... OP's piano. Ray Brown's bass and Herb Ellis' guitar presented remarkably better than I'd ever heard either. But the most striking thing overall was the sheer naturalness and lucidity to the thoroughly musical experience. Subtle passages were subtler, lively passages livelier with more detailed instrumental separation than ever (for me). Everything's so detailed, less challenging. Like new glasses for my ears.

I chose to build a separate power supply using an Avel-Lindstrom 250VA 25V-25V toroid and one of the rectifier boards. The pot is the excellent PEC 50k carbon stereo model from Digikey. The chassis for each cabinet is 1/2" 6061 aluminum paired (stays cool) with cabinet walls of 1/2" bleached Baltic Birch plywood stacked to show the laminations horizontally, a look I've been lately exploring.

The speakers, little 4" Dayton RS100S-8 full range drivers, although not fully broken in, sound terrific so far. I've temporarily mounted them OB in 1/4" hardboard panels. Surprisingly easy to listen to these. The bass is better than I'd have expected, clear and detailed. I'm hopeful that speaker cabinets will bring it forward a bit, but it's not a deal breaker. Maybe some Jordans later, but for now, I'll keep them. I'd like to know what others are doing with these drivers but as they're still fairly new, I'll have to be patient, I suppose.

I'd encourage anyone reading this who is still on the fence regarding gainclone building to leap in and do it. With these kits and the instruction here, it's entirely doable and truly rewarding.

Thanks again to DIYaudio and esp. thanks to Peter for the kits, this tutorial and the outstanding support.


David in SW FL
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th July 2008, 11:11 PM   #158
diyAudio Member
 
lanchile07's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Thumbs up LM3875!

I can not agreed more with you David! I have build three LM3875 amp.from Audiosector (Peter Daniel).and I am so happy with the clean sound of these fellas.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg img_1136.jpg (38.4 KB, 4332 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 15th July 2008, 03:22 AM   #159
diyAudio Member
 
danielwritesbac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Quote:
Originally posted by Peter Daniel . . . It so happens that I recently received an order for LM1875 amp . . .
Quote:
Originally posted by Peter Daniel Sounds very good, in my testing setup.
Hi Peter. Yes, its very good. KUDOS!! I have a question: If one wants to use a preamplifier, which do you recommend?
Thanks man!
  Reply With Quote
Old 15th July 2008, 05:11 AM   #160
diyAudio Member
 
Peter Daniel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Toronto, Canada
Send a message via AIM to Peter Daniel
I'm not good with recommending preamps, as I don't have much experience with them. If you don't need extra gain, just install quality attenuator directly at amp's input, other than that I can only recommend S&B TX102 as that's what I'm using myself in two different systems.
__________________
www.audiosector.com
“Do something really well. See how much time it takes. It might be a product, a work of art, who knows? Then give it away cheaply, just because you feel that it should not cost so much, even if it took a lot of time and expensive materials to make it.” - JC
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Commercial complete Gainclone kit for a beginner? gychang Chip Amps 365 4th October 2011 08:19 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 07:37 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2