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Old 7th September 2006, 10:57 PM   #1
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Default low tech paper arm tubes

have read here over time and see that wooden tone arms seem to sound very good There are examples of arrow shafts that have been solid and laminated as well as versions made from thin rolled wood veneer as well. I wondered if anybody had considered using paper as a roll laminate to make a tone arm tube? There are all kinds of papers with various fiber contents and structures.
I had thought that an assortment of different papers could be tested. The papers could be first surface sealed with a 5-1 diluted mix of water to weldbond (a PVA adhesive) on both sides using a light spray from a mister bottle. Once dried these sheets could be rolled into tubes with a thin layer of weldbond on one surface and taped in place to set up. This provides a rigid well damped tube. One could also make a tapered tube by rolling the paper at an angle or by simply pulling one end of the rolled tube out extending its length then tightening the roll. This would result with a tube with a small diametre at one end and a larger on at the other. The matreial is cheap and easy to play with and the variety of materials is endless. Combinations of different papers would alsp be easy to do. For someone without a lath or shop to work in this can be done almost for free on the kitchen table in a very short time period. Sections of shaped metal tubes from golf club shafts and the like could be used as forms for variable density laminates with fine thin hard paper as the first layer and a second layer of thicker paper like blotting paper in the middle covered by a top layer of the hard thin paper. A kind of paper version of plywood. Just a thought to help those with limited tools to experiment with thin light rigid wood based arm tubes. Hope this is of interest to some here. Regards Moray James.
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Old 8th September 2006, 11:30 AM   #2
owen is offline owen  United Kingdom
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Scary,

We've been thinking along the same lines - you could get some very interesting results by laminating different sorts of paper - and I think the results would be good.

You could also include fine fabrics in the 'roll' to assist in directional stiffness. Something like silk would do very well!

You can then do interesting things with glues as well - crazyglue with natural fabrics produce a very interesting composite...

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Old 8th September 2006, 04:52 PM   #3
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Starch!!
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Old 8th September 2006, 05:45 PM   #4
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I would suggest rolling/winding, and Then soaking/dipping in the glue mixture.

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Old 8th September 2006, 06:15 PM   #5
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Default other posibilities...

if you were to roll a damp paper tube in baking soda to pick up a uniform powder layer and them mist (in a really well ventilated outside location please) with crazy glue you end up with a kind of baking soda concreat where the crazy glue bonds all the powder together. Very uniform and stiff.
I am sure that one of us must know an artist that works with or makes paper there ought to be a wealth of construction techniques. Things like building on a tapered form first layer hard thin paper second layer thread wound clockwise third layer hard thin paper fourth layer thread wound counterclockwise fith layer hard thin paper. the posibilities are endless. Regards Moray James.
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Old 8th September 2006, 07:45 PM   #6
owen is offline owen  United Kingdom
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How about good quality papier mache - plenty of discontinuities, and very well damped.

It can also be moulded easily around forms - possibly even going as far as a nearly one piece design...

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Old 8th September 2006, 08:26 PM   #7
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One could also try high tech Nomex paper.
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Old 8th September 2006, 08:28 PM   #8
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Default Good idea!

that was kind of the idea I was thinking about with the laminate using blotting paper with hard paper skins. Paper mache could be used to form all kinds of smooth transitions and reinforcemenrts around connecting parts like the headshell or around stiffening ridges made fro wood (like balsa). One might sand a really hard wood into fine powder and make a thin slurry with 5-1 dilute weldbond and actually spray up layers onto a form one at a time to the desired thickness. Expanded craft foam coud be cut to shape and then top coated this way yielding a ultra light internally damped core with a composite wood skin. Working on a form one could mist the form with 5-1 weldbond and sprinkle with Sitka Spruce powder allowing the powder to set and then tapping off all the powder that did not stick then repeat. In this way one could build up uniform ultra thin layers of Sitka Spruce to form the equvilant of a fine piano sounding board. That ought to make a fine tone arm. Sitka Spruce is considered to be the best choice for sounding boards in musical instruments. Hemp might also be an interesting choice od materials to use with this kind of construction technique. Small bits of hemp rope could be powderized in an electric coffee grinder (as could any other small bits of wood) heck you could even make an tone arm out of coffee beans, the starbuck arm. Just too many posibilities but it sure make for interesting discussion. One could make exotic geometric mechanical structures usinf thin lengths of balsa wood and then reinforce the structure with multiple layers of powdered wood top coats. You could mix in carbon black into your wood powder to add additional strength. You can buy diamond powder as well which could be used as and add mixture. Arms could be fabricated from the same base material as that of your cartridge body which should make for excellent transmission of energy. Any more ideas? Regards Moray James.
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Old 8th September 2006, 11:18 PM   #9
Nanook is offline Nanook  Canada
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Default I'd try rolling papers...

the old 12" long ones, with matching rollers. Stuff full of whatever, and then paint with PVA. Once dry push out the contenets, let air out and reuse if neccessary., or use hemp rope ..


ok, even a drinking straw could be used... just re-inforce it with balsa lengthwise. The toughest part may be attaching a head shell , but a solid one could be fashioned, and a hole drilled through it longitudially..
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Old 9th September 2006, 10:11 AM   #10
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Hi, i think you guys are really on to something here.
There will be minor issues in reinforcing the joins to structural parts like the headshell and the bearing and weight mountings, but i can see that you could let in very slim laminations of non-oily hardwood (that will bond nicely to the paper) and laminate that up with auminium (that will epoxy-glue nicely to the wood). Should be very good structurally.

This is really like doing tiny vesions of composite-based stuff like car or boat bodies, where you need to let in thread bobbins etc.

A thought: for a tapered tube, how about wax candle former? Will slide out easily afterwards and you can even get very slim, tapered ones about the right diameter.

Err... one other thought, paper arm tube are gonna grow/shrink/warp with the weather. A sheet of A4 paper can change size more than 1.5mm if you run it through a laser printer and drop its humidity. OK if you don't mind re-setting your arm whenever it's rainy
regards, Jeff
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