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Old 19th January 2003, 09:18 AM   #11
Raka is offline Raka  Europe
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Default Yes, an AC maker seems to be fine

I'm doing this thing (I'm very slow and lazy ) and someday I will finish it. It's well explained in another thread I opened, search for the "Change in the frequency mains" one.

Seems to be an easy project and someone reported good results.

I wouldn't try to put mass in the platter. The Inertia would be higher, but if a perfect calibration can't be achieved the medicine is worse than the illness.

To fit a DC motor with voltage controls doesn't seem bad. Im going to search for a kit from some electronic supplier.
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Old 4th May 2007, 12:34 AM   #12
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I thought the adjustment on the springs was for ride height, that it did not change the spring rate.
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Old 4th May 2007, 02:45 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally posted by makinson1
I thought the adjustment on the springs was for ride height, that it did not change the spring rate.
The looser the springs are adjusted, the longer the bounce time, as it lowers the resonant frequency. Tighter makes shorter rate bounces. I'm not sure why this is, but it seems to be, at least it did with mine. Not a big difference, but noticeable.

I re-read what I wrote earlier and need to make a correction. The springs shouldn't be tight enough to make the sub-chassis actually touch chassis. If floor bounce is a problem, though, I've found that having them as stiff as possible helped in my room. I never did eliminate the problem, though, and ended up selling both my TD-145 and TD-160. I bought a suspensionless table and made a high mass plinth. Foot-fall problems are gone now.

Dave
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Old 4th May 2007, 03:09 PM   #14
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
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Default Td150

Hi,
Mak is right.
The bottom of the springs sit on the washers and in turn on the adjusting nuts. The tops of the spring support the rubber washer and that supports thearms of the cruciform that holds the spindle bearing.
The cruciform/bearing/platter float on the springs.

Adjusting the nuts just moves the platter up and down and when incorrectly set tilts it as well.
Correct adjustment eliminates the tilt and this may give a better bounce. It should not adjust the frequency.

However, the sponges inserted in the springs may change the damping immediately after an adjustment and this temporary condition could lead to an apparently changed bounce. As the sponges settle into their new positions the original damping and frequency will return.
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Old 4th May 2007, 03:33 PM   #15
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That may be what it was. The foam was rotted on mine, so I replaced it with some that was in there tight. Never thought of the foam catching on the bolt threads and making a difference, but I can see where it would. Thanks for clearing it up. Makes sense now.

Perhaps one can fine tune the suspension by how much and how tight the foam is?

Dave
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Old 4th May 2007, 08:14 PM   #16
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I rechecked the service manual (available for free download at VinylEngine.com) and it reads "the plastic gizmos raise and lower the chassis. Interestingly emough it shows an optional (disco balls) device to replace the springs in high vibration environments that look like little tennis balls or black rubber balls. So we are back to the beginning: put the TT on a stout stand, level the stand. Adjust the Thorens srews to level the plinth. Hope for the best. Many people, myself included, believe that the foam spring inserts are rubbish. I even tried filling mine with scraps of sorbothane. Probably did more harm than good by raising the fundamental frequency above 3Hz. Would love th know the stock Thorens spring rates. I used to have a contraption that had a scale on the bottom with a platform for the spring, an arbor press type lever to compress the spring, and a dial indicator on top to mesure deflection or amount of compression. So you would pull down on the arm a little, the scale would read 1.25 lbs, the dial indicator would read 0.25in, so we knew by simple division that that spring was 5lbs/inch. mayve if I put my digital phono stylus gauge in the bottom of my rifle cartridge reloading press, inserted the Thorens spring, taped my 6" machinists rule to the side, pulled down on the arm, read the scales and did the math, I would know the Thorens Spring Rate. Actually this would be darn accurate. I could see which springs had gone soft after 35 years of use. Thene I could buy a variety of springs from McMaster-Carr and Small Parts Inc to play with and fine hone the suspension. Sorry for the verbose reply, but sometimes waxing prolix clarifies the muddied waters of discourse. This maters to me personally because I need springs for my new DIY TT Thorens clone: see attached jpg.
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Old 5th May 2007, 07:37 AM   #17
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
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Hi,
The springs will not have gone soft.
The material and the size has not changed over the years.

It is possible but very unlikely that they may have shortened very slightly. If they have shortened this can be corrected in the levelling process
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Old 30th May 2007, 04:58 AM   #18
Alfredz is offline Alfredz  Australia
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Default Thorens TD 125 Mk II motor

Hi,
Does anyone know where I can get a replacement motor or get it rewound? I am in Australia.

regards,
Alfredz
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Old 30th May 2007, 12:56 PM   #19
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Expect to pay $60 USD if you find one on eBay.
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