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Old 13th April 2004, 05:38 PM   #1
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Location: Santiago, Chile
Default Walker turntable. What voltage?

I have only recently joined this forum and am very pleased with the help I received from Ingvar Ahlberg on my first posting regarding a problem with my Dynaco FM3.

Chile is a beautiful country; great for skiing, very nice and rapidly improving wines, but in terms of analogue audio we are really isolated at the bottom of the world here.

Several months ago, I purchased a Walker CJ61 turntable through eBay. It took me a while to get around to setting it up. First, because I discovered that I needed an arm with an integrated arm rest (no place to attach an arm post). Last weekend, I mounted a Stax carbon fiber arm that I had stashed away and forgotten. The cartridge is a Signet MR5.0e. I've tried to attach a picture, but since I'm new on this forum, I'm not sure if it will appear.

The electricity here in Chile is 240v 50HZ. Although the Walker came from Australia, I was wary about just plugging it into the mains (too many bad experiences) so I attached it to a variac beginning at 90v, pushed the "on" button on the table and slowly brought up the voltage. Nothing happened at 110, but at 127v, with a slight nudge the table turns at the correct 33 1/3 speed. My question is, might is this table designed to run on 240V? Would I be risking destroying the motor by increasing the voltage? Is there a way to discover what voltage the motor is designed for? I haven't had any luck searching for information on the internet.
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Old 13th April 2004, 05:54 PM   #2
sreten is offline sreten  United Kingdom
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Australian mains is 240V Hz.

Everything sounds fine for connecting 240V.

A 115V motor should start on its own by ~ 90V.

A 240V motor should start on its own at by ~ 180V.

I'd expect the voltage and frequency to be printed somewhere on the motor.

Also the voltage rating of the phase shifting capacitor should help.

sreten.
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Old 13th April 2004, 07:30 PM   #3
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Hi again Bill
I think Sreten is right, the Walker should be for 240v, check motor and and capacitor as mentioned.
Congratulations on having the Stax arm awaiting the turntable, which model is it? If needed iŽll mail You a better, printable, allignment protractor than the original.
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Old 13th April 2004, 08:48 PM   #4
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Hi,

I got into the innards of the table and took a look at the motor. I have tried to enclose a picture, but when I click on "submit reply" I get the following response that tells me:
"The image that you have attached is too big. Please make it no bigger than 800 x 1200". I don't know how to do that. But this is what is printed on the motor: Sodeco Switzerland 110VAC 60HZ 3.5W

It would be great to have a good alignment template for my tonearm. The wand is carbon fiber. I have several pictures of it as well. Same problem for including a picture.

Bill
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Old 13th April 2004, 09:18 PM   #5
sreten is offline sreten  United Kingdom
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Hmmmmm......

Now it gets confusing.

A 110V motor can be used on 240VAC with the right series resistor.
And a 60Hz motor can be used with 50Hz with the right pulley.

You say it does run at the right speed.

If it doesn't run at the right speed you need a new pulley
or a 60Hz oscilator supply.

If it does run at the right speed measure the voltage across
the series resistor, it its ~ 50% then 240V should be fine.

Also measure the resistor value which will give you the current
and thus as you know motor voltage its power dissapation.

Correct operating current is likely to be ~ 10mA.

For 240V operation the resistor only needs to be high enough
to keep the motor within its power range, so by keeping track
of voltage and current you can confirm this.

sreten.
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Old 14th April 2004, 06:34 AM   #6
Raka is offline Raka  Europe
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If it runs at the correct speed, you are half way home and can forget about the marking of the motor.

You only have to step down the voltage with a suitable resistor. In my thorens, the winding is 10Kohm, so an external 10K power resistor does the job of making the voltage half the value. I would start with a high value resistor until I hit the correct value.

Well, actually I would build an oscillator as better solution. In my case, the mains is a bit slower than 50Hz, that's what my Metallica LP says
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Old 14th April 2004, 11:39 AM   #7
sreten is offline sreten  United Kingdom
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Quote:
Originally posted by Raka
Well, actually I would build an oscillator as better solution. In my case, the mains is a bit slower than 50Hz, that's what my Metallica LP says
???? how can you tell from the LP ? sreten.
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Old 14th April 2004, 12:13 PM   #8
Raka is offline Raka  Europe
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Well, you can ask James about the corchea value, and if he's drunk you can put the same record in cd trying to synchronize both.
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Old 14th April 2004, 12:19 PM   #9
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Mine doesŽnt seem to fit in the tray of CD player
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Old 14th April 2004, 04:24 PM   #10
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I want to thank everyone for helping me out with this problem.

I finally found a way to provide you with some pictures through a web-hosting site.

Please take a look at the motor and associated components at
http://img3.imageshack.us/my.php?loc...orcapsres2.jpg

the large green resistor has "6K8 5%" on it. The resistance reads 5.67K between the two screw terminals where the resistors are connected. The pink cap is .22uF.

Should I apply 110 volts to the motor and then measure the voltage across the two resistors? (why there are 2 instead of just one I don't understand).

Bill
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