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-   -   Expressimo vs Origin (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/analogue-source/31815-expressimo-vs-origin.html)

faxurda 7th April 2004 08:43 PM

Expressimo vs Origin
 
I'm litter bit confuse!!! I would like one of this tonearm for my DIY project. But I can't decided wich one is better.

Expressimo RB250 modified
http://www.expressimoaudio.com/tonearm/tonearm.html

or

Origine Live OL1 fully Modified
http://www.tonearm.co.uk/tonearm.htm

The both are the same price and both have good review.

Please help me!!!!



:rolleyes:

sreten 7th April 2004 09:17 PM

In my DIY opinion :

Buy the standard RB250 arm.

(I'll note performance per dollar is far better than
any of the modded versions without exception.)

Rewire it yourself.

Glue a piece of steel thread into the plastic rear stub.

Take out the plastic grub screw, steel spring
and plastic ball from the counterweight.
Fit a steel grub screw to the counterweight.

Adjust the arm and tighten the grub screw.

You've just saved a lot of money.

If your wondering why the counterweight mods I've
described are not popular, simply there's no profit
margin involved in doing it this way.
Rewiring you can always charge for.

:) sreten.

rif 7th April 2004 09:39 PM

You could also try starting with an OEM version, like a MOTH RB250. There's a business that advertizes on audiogon, I forget exactly who, that I bought one from awhile back. britaudio maybe?

Raka 13th April 2004 12:27 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by sreten
In my DIY opinion :

Buy the standard RB250 arm.

(I'll note performance per dollar is far better than
any of the modded versions without exception.)

Rewire it yourself.

...

:) sreten.

And what's your DIY opinion for the internal wire?

I have a OL250 with level adjuster and the expressimo weight. Both pieces are easily machined in a metal shop. The only difference being glamour (well, depends on the eye...)
I can't remember the plastic grub screw, steel spring
and plastic ball from the counterweight from my RB250, but maybe it's my memory.

rif 13th April 2004 02:49 PM

I thought the tolerances on machined parts for TT's had to be very tight and would be difficult to do without the proper equipment (CNC)?

sreten 13th April 2004 03:11 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Raka


And what's your DIY opinion for the internal wire?

I have a OL250 with level adjuster and the expressimo weight. Both pieces are easily machined in a metal shop. The only difference being glamour (well, depends on the eye...)
I can't remember the plastic grub screw, steel spring
and plastic ball from the counterweight from my RB250, but maybe it's my memory.

Hi Raka,


Haven't really thought about it. Quality cartridge connectors for
my MC would be my first concern. Probably silver plated copper
stranded hook up wire, not too thin because of the MC.

Sorry to hear your memory is already going ;).
The Rega RB250 has a spring loaded captive plastic ball held in
by a plastic grub screw than engages with and slips over the
spiral in the plastic counterweight stub.
You do remember the spiral ? ;) .

:) Sreten.

sreten 13th April 2004 03:17 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by rif
I thought the tolerances on machined parts for TT's had to be very tight and would be difficult to do without the proper equipment (CNC)?
True for the bearings and similar.

However the counterweight and its stub are very straightforward,
the only critical tolerance is the thread for fitting onto the arm.

:) sreten.

Raka 14th April 2004 06:27 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by sreten



The Rega RB250 has a spring loaded captive plastic ball held in
by a plastic grub screw than engages with and slips over the
spiral in the plastic counterweight stub.
You do remember the spiral ? ;) .

:) Sreten.


Hi Sreten, you are very active ;)

I remember the spiral, and the screw, but as I replace the counterweight inmediately with the expressimo one, I don't remember the ball. I'll search for it, maybe OL didn't send it.

I'm looking for a rewiring, but can't find a suitable wire easily. I suppose it has to be not solid, but flexible, so my wire wrapping wire is not adequate. I already have the cartridge connector pins.

sreten 14th April 2004 07:36 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally posted by Raka


And what's your DIY opinion for the internal wire?


TBH I have a lot of sympathy with Rega's exasperation with
people re-wring their arms but not much with their grounding.

I'd consider replacing the connectors and the lead and fitting
a proper ground wire.

With my Rega RB250 I've fitted a ground wire and thats it.

Silver plated stranded wire seems to be hard to come across.

Doesn't seem anything special about Cardas or Discovery :
(except they are the right colours)

http://www.takefiveaudio.com/cable_and_wire.htm

For a one piece wire cartridge to amp I'd suggest this very
mundane cable stripped back for the arm internal wiring,
at the amp end heat shrinking is needed to reinforce the
wires after you've run off the 4 screens to the earth terminal,
though I've successfully used electrical tape in the past.

http://www.maplin.co.uk/?userid=Sear...rgetmodule=136

:) sreten.

analog_sa 14th April 2004 09:02 PM

Hi Raka

My advice is not to skimp on the tonearm wire. If your ears can differentiate between wires, the tonearm will be the most audible wire in your system. I am no big fan of Cardas wire but it will beat the original Rega wire by far, especially the pathetic disgrace they use outside the arm.

IMO the tonearm wire makes almost as much difference to the final sound as the arm mechanical construction. The best approach is to buy a few different sets of wire, solder the cart clips and phono plugs and try it just hanging outside the arm. If there is no substantial improvement you can save yourself the effort of rewiring. And if the wire is exotic enough i promise to buy it from you :)

Careful with the Discovery wire - it's much too thick and stiff for the Rega.


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