3 Phase Class D amp for DIY BLDC motor Drive - diyAudio
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Old 16th May 2017, 06:35 PM   #1
Pyramid is online now Pyramid  United States
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Default 3 Phase Class D amp for DIY BLDC motor Drive

This is a shared DIY project for non-commercial use.

The MA-3D is a 3 channel class D amp suitable for driving a BLWR172S-24-2000 or BLWS231S-24-2000 BLDC motor from Anaheim Automation. The amp is custom designed to work with only these 2 motors; any other motor connected to the output of the amp can permanently damage the amp. The BLWR series has a 4mm shaft and no mounting flange. The BLWS series has a ” shaft and a mounting flange that matches up with a Hurst 59 series motor. There are aluminum sleeves available from the RC boat market that will convert 4mm shafts to 3/16" props that will allow the BLWR series motor to work with 3/16" center bore pulleys ie VPI 600 RPM pulleys.

This is not a universal motor controller, it will only work with the 2 motors listed above. If you decide to use a different motor, you are on your own--do not ask me how to make it work for you.

The MA-3D is an amplifier section only and requires the SG-4 sinewave generator to provide the drive signals for each phase. The MA-3D board can also supply the SG-4 with the 12VDC signal needed to power it, so only one wall adapter is needed. The 15V 1A wall adapater included in the BOM powers both the SG4 and the MA-3D. The SG-4 must have firmware version 1.03 or later to work with these motors. V1.01 and 1.02 had a lower frequency limit of 40Hz for 33 RPM and 60Hz for 45 RPM. V1.03 reduces the lower frequency limit to 1.00Hz.

The PCB uses all thru-hole components for easy assembly (with the exception of the 4 inductors which are SMT), but some soldering skills are still required.

The project consists of a bare PCB, a parts "kit" available as a shared cart from Mouser electronics and the on-line documentation you see here.

The PCB is available from OshPark PCB fabricators at the following link: https://www.oshpark.com/shared_projects/mYxj6roI
The PCB is created in multiples of 3 for a cost of ~$54 or $18/board.

The parts kit can be ordered from Mouser Electronics: http://www.mouser.com/tools/projectcartsharing.aspx
Enter the Access ID code: 90C2DDF260. The parts kit to build 1 PCB costs $55.68.

The following documentation is available below to aid in construction of the project:

MA-3D Schematic.pdf
MA-3D Parts Locator.pdf
MA-3D Assembly Instructions.pdf
MA-3D BOM.pdf (Generic bill of materials with part references)
MA-3D.zip (Gerber X274 files if you want to use your own PCB fabricator)
MA-3D PCB.pdf (X-Ray view of the PCB w/traces, pads and silk screen)
MA-3D.png (X-Ray view of the PCB w/traces, pads and silk screen)
Attached Images
File Type: png MA-3D.png (21.4 KB, 353 views)
Attached Files
File Type: pdf MA-3D Schematic.pdf (55.0 KB, 85 views)
File Type: pdf MA-3D Parts Locator.pdf (37.6 KB, 31 views)
File Type: pdf MA-3D Assembly Instructions.pdf (829.0 KB, 60 views)
File Type: pdf MA-3D BOM.pdf (43.4 KB, 37 views)
File Type: zip MA-3D.zip (84.0 KB, 24 views)
File Type: pdf MA-3D PCB.pdf (72.1 KB, 35 views)

Last edited by Pyramid; 17th May 2017 at 02:17 PM.
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Old 16th May 2017, 11:38 PM   #2
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Thanks Mr Pyramid, you are the bestest, thanks.
Any suggestions on enclosures that might work well with this?

Appreciated, Greg
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Old 16th May 2017, 11:47 PM   #3
Pyramid is online now Pyramid  United States
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Greg-

You have a few more choices for a case as there is no external heatsink required and the whole project is powered from a 15V 1A wall wart. The MA-3D PCB is the same height as the SG4, only a half inch longer (2.5" x 4.25" vs 2.5" x 3.75" for the SG4).
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Old 17th May 2017, 12:14 AM   #4
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Sweet, thanks.
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Old 17th May 2017, 12:38 AM   #5
rif is offline rif  United States
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Pyramid

You're making this too difficult for me (in a very good way)

I was going to build a set up to control my existing hurst motor with a 2 phase input.

Now this bldc is very tempting. Those motors don't cost nearly as much as I feared. So for a little more $, might as well go for it right?

Again, thanks for all your work and knowledge sharing.
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Old 17th May 2017, 01:36 AM   #6
Pyramid is online now Pyramid  United States
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There's no comparison, the Hurst motors are not in the same league, even if driven dual phase. This motor/controller combo is a game changer, everything else is just p*****g in the wind.
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Old 17th May 2017, 03:08 AM   #7
twystd is offline twystd  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pyramid View Post
There's no comparison, the Hurst motors are not in the same league, even if driven dual phase. This motor/controller combo is a game changer, everything else is just p*****g in the wind.
By everything else, are you including the Papst flywheel motors running on 3 phase?

twystd
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Old 17th May 2017, 10:59 AM   #8
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Though I haven't tried the specific motors Bill is recommending, I have experimented with nearly a dozen different BLDC motors, including some high quality Vexta units. In no case could I achieve the vanishingly low level of vibration possible with the Papst outer rotor 3 phase motors.
The inherent problem with the Papst motors is availability; they are no longer made, and have to be bought second-hand, this introduces two issues;

1. Wear. the sleeve bearing is of very high quality, but can suffer some wear with time. It is possible to replace the oilite bushes, but this may be beyond some amateurs.

2. Specs. Obtaining a suitable Papst motor is a bit of a crap-shoot, there are many different sizes and power requirements; you pretty much have to get your motor first, then build the power supply around it.

For the reasons above most people will be more than happy with the solution Bill has come up with; for the few, we lucky few, I think the Papst is ultimately a better solution.
This is a personal opinion only, YMMV.

Last edited by ralphfcooke; 17th May 2017 at 11:02 AM. Reason: punctuation
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Old 17th May 2017, 11:51 AM   #9
Pyramid is online now Pyramid  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twystd View Post
By everything else, are you including the Papst flywheel motors running on 3 phase?

twystd
Personally, I've not done any testing with the Papst motor, but for all the reasons Ralph stated, this solution is certainly more practical if not an outright improvement.

I would add the AA motors have precision sealed ball bearings so they can handle higher radial loads and won't wear out and get sloppy (vibration) like friction bearings.

It would be interesting to compare the torque output between the AA motor and the Papst. A lot of people refer to the Papst motor as high power; I know they consume a lot of power, but I think they are relatively low efficiency so they might not produce the torque you would think. The flywheel will provide smoothness of rotation and may be unique with those motors.

I would encourage anyone who has the Papst motor to try this solution and report their thoughts on a comparison between the two.
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Old 17th May 2017, 12:19 PM   #10
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You are right Bill, the Papst motors are seriously inefficient, some quote as little as 6%. They are eddy current motors and rely on the magnetic field in the stator to create the field in the external rotor, which then opposes it. One of the advantages in this is the ability for the rotor 'poles' to be curved, producing a totally cogless rotating magnetic field; in conjunction with the three phases this creates a smoothness that I don't believe can be duplicated with any motor using permanent magnets and an iron core, where there is always some tendency to 'snap' to the next position of 'rest'.
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