TT platter bearing - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Source & Line > Analogue Source

Analogue Source Turntables, Tonearms, Cartridges, Phono Stages, Tuners, Tape Recorders, etc.

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 2nd March 2004, 03:57 PM   #1
Ilianh is offline Ilianh  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Ilianh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Montreal, Canada
Send a message via MSN to Ilianh
Default TT platter bearing

Hi,

I'm playing around trying to make myself a nice platter bearing, it has to be diy and I dont have a cnc lathe (nor do I have a normal lathe)

At first I thought about magnetic one, could be done, I have access to big woofer donut magnets and Nd magnets easily, but I'm scared their magnetic fields might affect the cartridge in some ways.

Then came the idea of using a PC Hard drive motor as a bearing for the platter, those are made to be super resistant and precise.

air bearing is out of question... I'm not a fan of air pumps..

So what do you guys think of the ideas.

Student budget is my only limitation but I have acess to lots of strange stuff (I work in a electronics store wich has 2 enormous backstores with surplus stuff)
__________________
Time is the best teacher; unfortunately, it kills all its students
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd March 2004, 05:02 PM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Scandinavia
My guess is that the motors for hard-drives are not intended to carry much weight.

I have also seen people use VCR head bearings for use in arms.

Petter
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd March 2004, 06:17 PM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Belgium
Do a search! This has been discussed ad nauseum on this forum when there was interest in making a DIY TT. You can even find some info about it in the corresponding wiki.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd March 2004, 07:20 PM   #4
AuroraB is offline AuroraB  Norway
diyAudio Member
 
AuroraB's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Norway, -north of the moral circle..
You can buy a top notch bearing here,..
http://www.teresaudio.com/
or maybe here
http://www.redpoint-audio-design.com...cts/index.html
Both part of the original Teres team..

If you want to give it a try yourself, I have the original drawings of this bearing, given to me by the original Teres designer.
The bearing drawings has been removed from the site, I think after some discrepancies among the first builders and designers.

I made my own bearing some time ago on a quite ordinary lathe...
just a bit more attention required...precision is the clue here.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd March 2004, 07:50 PM   #5
Ilianh is offline Ilianh  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Ilianh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Montreal, Canada
Send a message via MSN to Ilianh
Petter,
Thanks for the reply, at first I thought that too, but then after playing with one, even after aplying alot of pressure on it, it didn't show any trouble, do you think problems will occur eventualy with long term use? Or maybe a lighter plinth will help? 33.1/3 isnt too fast, I based my idea on that...




Havoc,
I've read every single diy TT thread on this forum, I thought I aknowledged this when starting a new thread and clicked "I've searched on the forum" I didnt know I had to explain this even after procceding with this standard procedure.

The only reference to a DIY Magnetic bearing was done on the "let's start a diyaudio TT" thread, and was only discussed by one reply by Planet10 saying it would be harder to create than a air bearing, but would be possible using speaker magnets.

And excuse me if my ignorance on how to search properly hasn't lead me to the discovery of threads talking about using a hard drive motor as bearing.

AuroraB,

Probably if I had the money for a bearing like this one, I wouldnt even post here on how to create a low-budget one.
I wish I owned a lathe or had access to one.
__________________
Time is the best teacher; unfortunately, it kills all its students
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd March 2004, 08:12 PM   #6
AuroraB is offline AuroraB  Norway
diyAudio Member
 
AuroraB's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Norway, -north of the moral circle..
Sorry for not reading thoroughly..

A magnetic bearing was used in the early Verdier "La Platine".
It was described quite extensively some time in the late 80s in the french mag l'Audiophile, as a DIY project..
You will still need a lathe to turn the pole pieces acting as a sideways bearing, even if the platter is suspended on a mag. field
  Reply With Quote
Old 3rd March 2004, 12:06 AM   #7
Sid-W is offline Sid-W  United Kingdom
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Derbys
I think you would probably do well to find an electronics enthusiast who is also a machinist and swap him some of that surplus gear you have access to for a nicely made bearing

Probably the easiest DIY bearing to make would be the 'Well Tempered' type. It's clever design removes the need for high precision in manufacture ( although you never get something for nothing and the downside will be a little careful setup work during assembly ) . The US patent number is 4,792,938 - inventors name Wiliam Firebaugh - do a search on the USPTO website to find it.
I haven't tried it myself, but I intend to in the near future. Even though I have a pretty well equipped machine shop, this design is still attractive to me because it is so elegant.

You could probably make one from stock materials and whatever you can scrounge, but you'll definitely need access to a bench drill, taps and some skill and care. To align it when it's built will take a jig, ideally one using a DTI indicator. It's do-able on a limited budget\limited equipment basis I would say.

Another approach if you are going to DIY a turntable would be to rob a bearing from a defunct Japanese TT ( which usually have some well engineered parts inside them and cost peanuts )
I have a Rotel RP-830 which is 18 years old and the bearing is as good as the day it left the factory. It isn't very 'trick' or fashionable but it has minimal sideplay and is inaudible to all practical purposes.

Good Luck
  Reply With Quote
Old 3rd March 2004, 06:37 AM   #8
Raoul is offline Raoul  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: OR
Default Teres bearing

AuroraB,

I would be interested in the drawings if you don't mind sharing. I am taking a CNC Mill as well as a CNC Lathe course...might be a good project for Spring term.

Best regards,

Steve.
  Reply With Quote
Old 4th March 2004, 10:45 AM   #9
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Belgium
Quote:
I've read every single diy TT thread on this forum, I thought I aknowledged this when starting a new thread and clicked "I've searched on the forum" I didnt know I had to explain this even after procceding with this standard procedure.
Sorry, but the way you posed the question led me to believe you just ticked the box.

Thing is HD platter bearings were discussed and dismissed. I took a HD apart, and the bearing is part of the case and the spindle, it is not a separate thing. Also the only ones usable would be ball bearings as the fluid dynamic ones are designed for a certain speed. And BB was dismissed on noise production. (I'm not totaly convinced on that point, but thats another thing)
  Reply With Quote
Old 5th March 2004, 05:59 PM   #10
Ilianh is offline Ilianh  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Ilianh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Montreal, Canada
Send a message via MSN to Ilianh
Sid-W,
Awsome stuff, I may try that out, not too expensive either, I saw 1 foot long, 1/4 inch thick Teflon rods at McMaster-Carr for around 1$

Theres Brass rods, around 8$ for 3" long and 1/2" inch thick at McMaster-Carr

And I need something like a housing, I guess a square one rather than round might be easier to work with. The main problem is how to make the teflon pads easily adjustable. I'd guess a plastic housing would be easier to work with too.

What about using teflon rings that the shaft will get in? more points of contact but better stability.

As of tools, I have a bench drill, bench saw, jig saw, normal drills etc...


but I dont have a metal lathe



AuroraB,
wow, I was unnaware something like this existed, And I guess that as the 2 equal magnetic fields opose one another the magnets don't affect the cartridge in any ways.

Might be fun to try I have alot of speaker magnets at my job.


Havoc,
Yes BB might introduce noise, thats why I thought of Hdd bearings, I thought maybe those would be ultra low noise.

Well.. they can be removed off the Hdd casing.. just use something to hit the shaft off the housing from behind.
__________________
Time is the best teacher; unfortunately, it kills all its students
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Well Tempered platter bearing? moray james Analogue Source 12 21st April 2009 02:01 PM
Any interest in an acrylic platter group buy, and a bearing? Nanook Group Buys 152 3rd July 2008 02:09 PM
Teres platter and bearing randytsuch Swap Meet 3 26th September 2007 03:35 AM
DIY platter bearing cougarnut Analogue Source 17 9th September 2005 02:16 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 03:44 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2