How do I polish out fine scratches of record deck cover? - diyAudio
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Old 24th April 2014, 02:07 PM   #1
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Default How do I polish out fine scratches of record deck cover?

Just wondered if there is a method of polishing out fine swirly scratches on a perspex record player cover (without creating more of a swirly mess myself)?
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Old 24th April 2014, 02:10 PM   #2
Mooly is offline Mooly  United Kingdom
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This stuff is good,
PLASTICCLEAN - -- - PLASTIC POLISH | CPC From This Range&MER=e-bb45-00001003
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Old 24th April 2014, 02:20 PM   #3
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Nice one (not pledge then?). Any special cloth required to go with it?
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Old 24th April 2014, 02:31 PM   #4
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
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I wonder if toothpaste is any good?
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Old 24th April 2014, 02:45 PM   #5
Mooly is offline Mooly  United Kingdom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bitsandbobs View Post
Nice one (not pledge then?). Any special cloth required to go with it?
Just a very soft cotton cloth. Maybe use an old duster. Finish off with the spray polish to get a gleaming finish.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndrewT View Post
I wonder if toothpaste is any good?
You wonder. Toothpaste works really well on plastic headlamps that have gone milky/yellowed. You would sware that the plastic had aged but its not in many cases, its a film or layer on the surface. Use toothpaste and they come up as twinkly as new one.
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Old 24th April 2014, 03:31 PM   #6
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Hi,
This works really well:

http://www.fako.de/00000390.html

Fakopol should be available outside Europe too.

Alternatively you can try polishing paste for motorcycle helmet viziers.

Cheers,

Frank
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Old 24th April 2014, 03:35 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bitsandbobs View Post
not pledge then?
No as that's just a (crappy silicone) wax not a polish.
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Old 24th April 2014, 03:44 PM   #8
msb64 is offline msb64  Canada
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Toothpaste does work to some extent, but it is surprisingly abrasive.
Try it on a old cd or dvd and you can see all of the fine scratches it creates.
The best polish I have tried so far is from Novus, they have 3 grades that include a heavy & fine scratch remover as well as a clean & shine plastic polish.
NOVUS Plastic Polish
It works great, I have used it on dvds, laser discs, automotive lenses, as well as arcade machine plexiglass & acrylic displays.
The gel toothpaste I have tried would be somewhere between the heavy and fine scratch remover in cutting and polishing ability.
A power buffer with give the best results, but you can get good results by hand.
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Old 24th April 2014, 04:13 PM   #9
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NOVUS looks perfect for the job but, it's expensive!

Will I not get the same effect with first suggestion of PLASTICCLEAN?
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Old 24th April 2014, 04:22 PM   #10
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I agree on the fine scratches left by toothpaste. These can be reduced by Brasso on a cloth or wadding. But there are probably better products to use in the first place. That plasticlean is probably worth a try. Just bear in mind by hand it is intensive work, it's not a quick wipe over like dusting a table.
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