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Old 7th April 2013, 04:58 PM   #11
AVWERK is offline AVWERK  United States
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Location: So Calif.
Theoreticaly you are right about balance, this is not a casting but solid material.
I would still check it though.
You can do a quick and dirty balance by placing 3 springs under a test plinth with your bearing bolted to it.
Start moving the 3 springs (Y arangement) equally closer and closer increasing sensitivity, toward the center bearing and simply watching the outer rim spining the platter by hand.
I did this on a 1" acrylic with lead rimed grove and had to adjust accordingly.
The sonic difference was incredible before and after!
This simple technique will eliminate any assumptions
Looking forward to your completed design!

Regards
David
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Old 7th April 2013, 05:08 PM   #12
fmena is offline fmena  Canada
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Thumbs up THANK YOU STEVE!!!

I have the Maxon A-Max motor with Mark Kelly's motor controller and your tip has really helped!

Cheers
Frank M
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Old 7th April 2013, 06:02 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AVWERK View Post
Theoreticaly you are right about balance, this is not a casting but solid material.
I would still check it though.
You can do a quick and dirty balance by placing 3 springs under a test plinth with your bearing bolted to it.
Start moving the 3 springs (Y arangement) equally closer and closer increasing sensitivity, toward the center bearing and simply watching the outer rim spining the platter by hand.
I did this on a 1" acrylic with lead rimed grove and had to adjust accordingly.
The sonic difference was incredible before and after!
This simple technique will eliminate any assumptions
Looking forward to your completed design!

Regards
David
Except the assumptions that you springs have identical perfection linear deflection for any given load....
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Old 7th April 2013, 06:22 PM   #14
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IMO the spring technique should work well. It will either vibrate or it won't. Even if the k of the springs is different you'll know when good balance is achieved. I was thinking it could also be done static, doing up some fixture like a bubble tire balance machine. You just have to get the cg in the right place to have sensitivity.
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Old 14th April 2013, 11:12 AM   #15
quan is offline quan  Australia
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Originally Posted by user510 View Post
Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

Mine had the A-Max 110189. I had several upgrades of the controller. Which was of the original Manfred design. This controller, while providing a rather neat on/off feature was probably the weakness and cause for the laid-back sound qualities of the deck. I presume the Mark Kelley controller should impart a very different character. The motor itself has power. I think I once figured that at 33-1/3rd platter rpm, my motor was outputting 8watts.

Please note that the reason I call my old Teres "laid back" is because when I got a TD124, I discovered what the opposite of laid back is.

Another thing I learned about the A-Max. It requires periodic oiling. If not, the motor starves for lube. Not good. Figure once a year, re-oil its bushings.

-Steve
Hi Steve, you mention re -oiling for maxon motor. My turntable maxon motor has been running for a few years now without re-lubbing. Do you mean re-grease of the bushings?.
Quan
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Old 14th April 2013, 03:51 PM   #16
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Quote:
Hi Steve, you mention re -oiling for maxon motor. My turntable maxon motor has been running for a few years now without re-lubbing. Do you mean re-grease of the bushings?.
Quan
Click the image to open in full size.

Yes bushings. See item 13 in the illustration: But not grease. Oil. Electric motor oil. approximately 20 wt.

-Steve
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Old 14th April 2013, 10:09 PM   #17
quan is offline quan  Australia
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Thank you Steve, pardon me i can't see any recess for oiling. Do you just use a small pipet to drop the oil in? And how much roughly. I tried to open my motor last night but really stuff up those small screws badly.Huh.
Quan
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Old 14th April 2013, 10:14 PM   #18
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Thank you Steve, pardon me i can't see any recess for oiling. Do you just use a small pipet to drop the oil in? And how much roughly. I tried to open my motor last night but really stuff up those small screws badly.Huh.
Quan
Click the image to open in full size.

There is only access to one of the bushings. The one at the pulley end. This is oiled by dripping onto the shaft and allowing gravity to pull the lube in. I've no idea how to get oil the the other end without a complete motor disassembly.

I do know that the upper bushing can go dry. It has on me, anyway. And when I lubed the one bushing, the motor began operating normally again.

-Steve
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Old 14th April 2013, 10:30 PM   #19
quan is offline quan  Australia
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Thank you Steve the picture posted got me confused as it showed the other end of the motor.

Last edited by quan; 14th April 2013 at 10:30 PM. Reason: speeling
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Old 14th April 2013, 11:19 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by quan View Post
Thank you Steve the picture posted got me confused as it showed the other end of the motor.
Click the image to open in full size.

Yes. This photo shows the commutator and brushes. The grease is for the precious metal brushes. Platinum, I believe.

In order to gain access to the bushing and shaft just below, the motor must be further dismembered. I never bothered. Instead, I got into TD124's. Those are more maintenance friendly.

-Steve
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