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Old 21st February 2013, 03:07 AM   #251
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Hi all, I've been following this forum since December '12, and am very enthused at the genuine team spirit and non-condescending replies from gurus BBFTX, Shaun, VinylAddict, Ishmail, kgturner, and others, to enquiries of naive startups (adding myself).
I have a motely collection of about 300 LPs since 16 years when I came to Canada, and have not played even a single one in all these years (!). I bought a Linn Sondek LP12 then, also not used. My reasoning is that since I want to record the LPs to CD/DVD with the best quality, I would wait until the technology is available to convert the music as losslessly as possible. I have settled on Blaze Audio and Audacity for the software portion. However, I believe that any cleaning process prior to recording from LPs must not involve any friction, even from brushes.
I thought of building my own US cleaning unit, but could not figure out how to keep the labels dry without clamping the LPs with label-clamps and immersing the entire LP in the medium, one at a time.
Thanks to the genius of the above named people (and also thosee included by way of "etc."), I like the idea of vertical immersion AND slow rotation of upto 3 LPs at once.
I have most parts but am awaiting delivery of the 3 rpm motor, the 12v pump and new antistatic inner sleeves.
I am using the central post and the cranked rack of a Giottos photo tripod to raise/lower the motor & spindle. Will post pics when thr unit is ready.
I would like to share an excellent way to save the labels - using the Moen Basket Strainer Gasket (M8910) from the plumbing supplies at Home Depot. Each is a set of 1 black rubber gasket and 1 plastics white friction washer. The rubber is very good quality and is actually meant to provide a seal. Cost is about $2.xx per pack, and 6 are needed to face up to 3 LPs. I bought 12 inch sheets of cork from the dollar store and cut 20x 4.25 inch discs to form 4 sets of spacers for the LPs.
By the way, I am also going to use a -type vacuum made by converting a cheap Technics DD turntable, to extract the last traces of moisture after the US cleaning cycle.
Hope I have not caused drowsiness in any of you, and I hope my suggestions of using a camera tripod raising/lowering mechanism and the Moen rubber rings will be useful to someone who is keen on customising a new build.
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Old 21st February 2013, 03:17 AM   #252
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Hi again,

Realized that I missed mentioning the type of vacuum unit I built: . . .
. . .
By the way, I am also going to use a Loricraft-type vacuum made by converting a cheap Technics DD turntable, to extract the last traces of moisture after the US cleaning cycle.
Thanks,
Edwin
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Old 23rd February 2013, 10:41 AM   #253
bbftx is offline bbftx  United States
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Default Rack and Spur Gears

Hi Edwin,
I can't wait to see photos of your completed setup. I like the gasket idea and the crank rack method of raising and lowering the spindle!

If anyone is interested in buying rack and spur gears to build such a setup from basic parts instead of using an old tripod, McMaster Carr has a good selection of plastic racks and gears at reasonable prices.
McMaster-Carr Molded Nylon Spur Gears and Racks
Cheers,
B B
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Old 2nd March 2013, 04:07 PM   #254
ketchup is offline ketchup  United States
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Have any of you guys opened up your ultrasonic cleaners? I'm curious as to how many transducers are typically used, where on the tank they are placed, and the way in which they are attached to the tank. Thanks!
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Old 2nd March 2013, 07:16 PM   #255
Bibio is offline Bibio  Scotland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ketchup View Post
Have any of you guys opened up your ultrasonic cleaners? I'm curious as to how many transducers are typically used, where on the tank they are placed, and the way in which they are attached to the tank. Thanks!
i would also like to know as i can have Stainless Steel tanks made up to any shape or size i want.
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Old 3rd March 2013, 03:44 AM   #256
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For the size of tanks most are using here, 3 actuators mounted on the bottom surface is typical. Some might have one more or less. My Gemoro cleaner has 3 actuators mounted in a row, each on a circular protrusion (when viewed from outside the tank) that is formed into the bottom of the tank. Presumably, the protrusions stiffen the floor of the tank and are intended to tune the overall dynamic response of the ultrasonic system.

It might have been earlier in this thread or perhaps a different one, but one poster advised against building your own ultrasonic device because it would require careful tuning of the whole system for efficiency and to get an even power distribution throughout the bath. The tuning must cover the dynamic response of the tank, the water in it, the actuators themselves, the attachment of the actuators to the tank, and perhaps more. Getting all this right might not be so easy to diy. I tend to agree with this advice unless you have special expertise in this area or would enjoy the exercise for its own sake.

By the way, welcome to the recently joined posters.
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Old 3rd March 2013, 04:13 AM   #257
bcarso is offline bcarso  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishmail View Post
For the size of tanks most are using here, 3 actuators mounted on the bottom surface is typical. Some might have one more or less. My Gemoro cleaner has 3 actuators mounted in a row, each on a circular protrusion (when viewed from outside the tank) that is formed into the bottom of the tank. Presumably, the protrusions stiffen the floor of the tank and are intended to tune the overall dynamic response of the ultrasonic system.

It might have been earlier in this thread or perhaps a different one, but one poster advised against building your own ultrasonic device because it would require careful tuning of the whole system for efficiency and to get an even power distribution throughout the bath. The tuning must cover the dynamic response of the tank, the water in it, the actuators themselves, the attachment of the actuators to the tank, and perhaps more. Getting all this right might not be so easy to diy. I tend to agree with this advice unless you have special expertise in this area or would enjoy the exercise for its own sake.

By the way, welcome to the recently joined posters.
Commenting so that I can keep up
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Old 3rd March 2013, 04:54 AM   #258
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Default Kodak Photo Flo 200 alternatives

Amazon no longer carries Kodak Photo Flo 200, and bhphotovideo.com is sold out at the moment. On the other hand, freestylephoto.biz was sold out, but now has more of the Kodak product available. I don't know whether all this is a fluke, or a sign that Photo Flo will become increasingly difficult to obtain in the wake of the Kodak bankruptcy. If a shortage does develop, freestylephoto.biz offers a photo flo clone at a slightly lower price called LegacyPro 200 Wetting Agent. This appears to be a suitable substitute, but I have not tried it.

I'm currently exploring alternatives to the Alconox detergents I've been testing to date (I'll post more on these later --- they have strengths and weaknesses). Of course one of the options is the Photo flo + IPA formula that most folks on this thread are using. The MSDS for Photo Flo 200 reveals that its main ingredients are the surfactant, Triton X-114 (CAS 9036-19-5), at 5-10% and propylene glycol (used for de-icing airplanes among other things) at 25-30%. I'm not sure what the propylene glycol's intended function is in the photography application (possibly a stabilizer), but I think the Triton X-114 is the ingredient we're most interested in. If anyone has information to the contrary, please let me know.

You will mostly find positive reports around the web from people who use Photo Flo for record cleaning, but there are some who claim it should never be used because it leaves residues that either compromise sound or even damage vinyl over time. While it's true that these ingredients have very slow evaporation rates, and this implies some form of residual film, I'm not convinced that anyone has demonstrated any negative effects in practice, especially at the very low concentrations proposed in this thread. On the other hand, getting Triton X-114 without the propylene glycol (described as a sticky liquid at room temp.) would seem to be a good thing. A product called Arista Flo Wetting Agent, also available at freestylephoto.biz in 4oz and 16oz bottles, provides exactly this. The Arista Flo MSDS only lists Triton X-114 at 20-30% concentration, and it contains no propylene glycol. I think this product should be of interest to followers of this thread who use the no-rinse approach to ultrasonic cleaning.

In fact, I was on the verge of ordering the Arista Flo product, but then was tempted to try the Library of Congress recipe based on Tergitol 15-S-7. This surfactant is not readily available unless you're associated with a lab or a suitable business. If I'm unable to obtain it, I'll order some Arista Flo instead.
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Old 3rd March 2013, 05:30 AM   #259
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Ethylene glycol is used in anti-freeze in your car. Propylene glycol is used in food all the time. Either one has a fairly high viscosity so I am not sure why you would use them and they are both sticky and oily but would work as a lubricant. I would think that there are any number of surfactants that could be used to break the surface tension of the dirt you are trying to remove. DI water and alcohol at a low concentration would be the rest of the solution. If I remember correctly one of the surfactants used in dish washer detergent is a little bit of cyanide.
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Old 3rd March 2013, 01:42 PM   #260
Pano is offline Pano  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishmail View Post
By the way, welcome to the recently joined posters.
I directed them over here from the Blowtorch II thread, I hope you don't mind. And I hope that we can keep on topic, this thread has been excellent so far - as Esaldanha so correctly points out above.

BTW, I agree on the BUY vs DIY on this. I really wanted to build the ultrasonic tank from scratch to save money, but looking at the cost of the parts there was no point. Has anyone found otherwise?
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