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just an idea 30th May 2012 03:45 PM

simple wiring for rega motor
 
Hello,

I'm currently deep into research for building my first turntable mainly around rega parts.... I have chosen Rega parts as they seem readily available, good quality and I can't work out how to calculate pully sizes in order to get correct speed, so have chosen to get a standard rega motor, pully and subplatter and hope it runs at the right speed... how much does platter weight affect speed??... maybe someone can help with this.

So my main question is, once i've bought an old rega motor off ebay, I understand I need to connect it to a couple of capacitors (I think)... can some one draw me a quick diangram to show what wire should be connected to where... then do different switches add different resistances, so will I have to add in resistors if I use a non standard rega switch?...

sorry for the basic questions, I know I can make the plinth good but the rest is beyond me... I'm handy enough though once I understand.

Thanks for your help.

Osvaldo de Banfield 30th May 2012 04:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by just an idea (Post 3042525)
Hello,

I'm currently deep into research for building my first turntable mainly around rega parts.... I have chosen Rega parts as they seem readily available, good quality and I can't work out how to calculate pully sizes in order to get correct speed, so have chosen to get a standard rega motor, pully and subplatter and hope it runs at the right speed... how much does platter weight affect speed??... maybe someone can help with this.

Weight affects acceleration, not velocity. The more weight, the more inertial moment, so it will demand more time and or more power to the motor to reach final velocity. Same difference between a car and a truck, supposing same motor power.

Quote:

So my main question is, once i've bought an old rega motor off ebay, I understand I need to connect it to a couple of capacitors (I think)... can some one draw me a quick diangram to show what wire should be connected to where... then do different switches add different resistances, so will I have to add in resistors if I use a non standard rega switch?...

sorry for the basic questions, I know I can make the plinth good but the rest is beyond me... I'm handy enough though once I understand.

Thanks for your help.
You must get the motor wiring. Run capacitor depends upon motor design. Over graded cap will overload the coil, and undersized the motor has low power at the axis.

coolmaster 31st May 2012 12:13 PM

Circuitry here: http://www.mclennan.co.uk/datasheets...0411131813.pdf

For 220-240V, Rega have a 12Kohm 5W resistor in series. The original circuit shows 6K8, which outputs a higher line voltage to the motor. Rega reduced the voltage for lesser vibration and smoother operation. I think that is the norm found in any Rega using that same 110VAC motor. The same 12Kohm resistor also worked very well with a Thorens Pabst 110V motor.

Osvaldo de Banfield 31st May 2012 12:23 PM

You can also use a capacitor with the same reactance, and the avoid wasting 5W. I did these things to energize a small 110V radio from 220V.

Zoodle 5th June 2012 08:07 AM

Rega makes an upgrade kit that might interest the OP. It includes the new, lower vibration motor, (which can be firm mounted) plus a new power supply board. IMO, this is better value than most of the motors found on Ebay, which tend to be the older spec.

just an idea 9th June 2012 09:49 AM

All that advice is great thanks, although I have to admit some of it went over my head a little. My knowledge of electics is 'shockingly' bad.

I just got a motor of ebay that had been taken from a P3 and is the newer style stick on type rather than screw screw on susbpended by an elastic bad type. This comes with a little circuit board which is great but has no switch... so my quextion is when i buy a switch do different switches create different amounts of resistance in the circuit. I have found a nice toggle switch with and led on the end but fear this may cause more resistance than the original rega switch... if this is a problem what should I be looking out for when i get a new swith to match regas?

sq225917 9th June 2012 02:28 PM

Most switches ahave essentially zero resistance when passing current, pretty much anything will do if it doesn't have a light in it.

Zoodle 13th June 2012 04:55 AM

Make sure the switch is rated for your application. When hooking all this up take no chances with safety.

just an idea 14th June 2012 01:03 AM

Just so I'm sure what rating of switch should I be looking for?... I'm getting a reputation for electrcuting myself and to be honest I was fed up of it after the first time....

Renron 15th June 2012 04:07 PM

A 5A 120V should be more than enough for the motor.
Ron


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