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Old 30th September 2013, 07:50 PM   #161
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Originally Posted by Dave Cawley View Post
C2, C4, C6 just change them, you can't really measure with what you have.

I use Panasonic FC 12uF 100 V part no. EEUFC2A120

Dave
Thanks. I'll check to make certain they already have not been replaced and then order replacements.

-Steve
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Old 30th September 2013, 08:04 PM   #162
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A great looking project. I am sure it will sound great. And it should be useful as a TOOL, as you suggested it is to become. Somewhat skeletal such as those plinths built by Terry Cain.

As the original poster of the Chadwick mods to your site (via aa) years ago, (and my continuing developments from my own experiences) may I suggest something that will kill fewer trees? If making from BB, please glue strips up to make the perimeter frames, as this will minimize waste (you probably have lots of scraps and off-cuts). Else I might suggest the use of hickory. It is very hard, quite dense and is very stable dimensionally if finished (and can be free if you can re-cycle old hockey sticks if anyone is still using the wooden ones).
re: plinth design. Baltic Birch in a layered glue-up. some of the pieces can be made from remnants I already have. re: carbon footprint and killing trees. these are Russian trees and I'm not certain if the Russians farm their timber the way it is done in North America. In NA commonly used timber, fir trees for example, are farmed by large corporations and can be thought of as a renewable resource.

fwiw I do avoid exotic woods which are known to be prohibited by one country or another. Example; ebony from India, Rosewood from Brazil. However, Ebony from Gabon, Africa is not yet prohibited. Same for cocobolo from Costa Rica. The cost of ebony restricts the amount that I use down to small and few pieces. I'm not really that crazy about cocobolo so I tend not to use it.

re: hickory versus baltic birch multi-ply. I like the constrained layer and grain organization within the birch ply. It is a product that tends to work well in audio related projects. And the cost is reasonable. In my area there is a plywood store a few blocks away from me that sells the Baltic Birch multi-ply. they recognize me when I walk in

-Stever

Last edited by user510; 30th September 2013 at 08:13 PM.
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Old 1st October 2013, 10:03 PM   #163
Nanook is offline Nanook  Canada
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Default efficient use of resources...

Steve.

Great to see that you are not against creating a plinth with offcuts or otherwise useless pieces of scrap BB ply (I too like BB ply, but if truely sold as Baltic Birch ply, the Scandinavians have the lock on that).

I am sure you will find the BB plinth to sound very good indeed. I may take my chances on the hickory/hockey stick style if I decide to build another plinth for an idler.

If you avoid the use of all exotic woods, you help reduce the market for them, thus helping to conserve he resource (sorry if it seems I/m getting "preachy" here).
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Old 1st October 2013, 10:54 PM   #164
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Originally Posted by Nanook View Post
Steve.

Great to see that you are not against creating a plinth with offcuts or otherwise useless pieces of scrap BB ply (I too like BB ply, but if truely sold as Baltic Birch ply, the Scandinavians have the lock on that).

I am sure you will find the BB plinth to sound very good indeed. I may take my chances on the hickory/hockey stick style if I decide to build another plinth for an idler.

If you avoid the use of all exotic woods, you help reduce the market for them, thus helping to conserve he resource (sorry if it seems I/m getting "preachy" here).
If I were living far enough north to be witness to the melting down of the polar ice cap, (say in the Northwest Territories) I might become very concerned about global warming. And part of this, afaik, is a result of the deforesting of planet earth. In particular, Amazon rain forest.

Even living at the latitude that I do, Seattle area, I must say the weather is getting pretty screwy in recent years. global warming? I dunno but evidence is mounting to support the notion.

Anyway, a carbon footprint can't be too large if utilizing wood products that are farmed in a responsible manner. Example, lumber taken from fir trees that are constantly being re-planted after harvest. Life cycle around 20 to 30 years. Not old growth timber.

I can't say about the Baltic Birch. Whether it be from Finland or Russia. I think the Baltic Birch region we are talking of includes timber from both of those countries. The stuff I see, I presume, is mainly exported from Russia. I would hope that these exporters are being good stewards to planet earth.

-Steve
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Old 1st October 2013, 11:07 PM   #165
brianco is offline brianco  Ireland
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user 501

My experience - as I think I said - was from some years ago. My arm was, I seem to remember, a 1.5 (or maybe the model before that) and it was on that basis that I made my remarks as above. From most points of view a well designed unipivot has to be preferable to any traditional ball race/multi-pivot design.

I am pleased that the 2.2 is more tunable; I had to make a Zeta style counter weight with various discs all of which were necessary to balance out the Io!
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Old 1st October 2013, 11:54 PM   #166
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user 501

My experience - as I think I said - was from some years ago. My arm was, I seem to remember, a 1.5 (or maybe the model before that) and it was on that basis that I made my remarks as above. From most points of view a well designed unipivot has to be preferable to any traditional ball race/multi-pivot design.

I am pleased that the 2.2 is more tunable; I had to make a Zeta style counter weight with various discs all of which were necessary to balance out the Io!
we can mass tune a tonearm heavier than it is but not lighter. So a medium mass arm can accept headweights and larger counterweights. Although for the Graham, we want to use the counterweights Bob Graham makes. Or at least I do. I think the Grahams we are talking about were offered for sale in two different configurations. Standard and deluxe. The deluxe kit came with some extras like the little plastic spindle pin that allowed us a really simple way to find pivot to spindle. And the overhang/zenith jig, and the auxiliary CW. Considering how I'm always moving the arm from one TT to another, I really value those extra pieces.

Anyway, it's harder to go the other direction (lower mass) except for those tonearms that offer plug in arm wands in various weights. Like some of the Moerch models.

I recall trying a Shure V15VxMR on my Graham for a while. The arm was too heavy for the Shure. Even with the "dynamic stabilizer" deployed on the Shure, it just did not seem appropriate.

On the Moerch, I wonder why some of us have not already tried a Moerch on various vintage turntables, including some idler models as well as some of the more interesting DD. Example, a Moerch DP6. Interesting about the Moerch is that their armwands are offered in two different lengths as well as various weights. So we could have a 12 inch Moerch on an SP10.

I haven't heard a Moerch, but they are very well regarded all over. If the price were right on a lightly used one.........

-Steve
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Old 2nd October 2013, 12:05 AM   #167
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Originally Posted by user510 View Post
I would hope that these exporters are being good stewards to planet earth.
Take a look at Ikea. They seem to be awfully efficient in the way they consume wood fibre. The Fin's are no slouches either, when it comes to processing fibre. The Russian's, maybe not so much.

jeff

Last edited by vinylkid58; 2nd October 2013 at 12:11 AM.
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Old 5th October 2013, 09:03 PM   #168
nilsW is offline nilsW  Sweden
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Hi all,

I have been following this thread with great interest. It is great to see so many people with a keen interest in these old record players!

The thread inspired me to bring down my old SP-10 from the attic where it has been sitting for at least 5 years. I now want to get it up and running.

I thought I would spend an hour to clean the bearing and to get some new oil into it, and then start to play some music.

But unfortunately I discovered that the plastic thing on top of the bearing is worn down to such degree that the bare metal of the bearing shaft top is just visible

Is there anyone who has advice how to replace the worn cap (thrust plate?), and what material to use?

Nils
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Old 5th October 2013, 10:17 PM   #169
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Originally Posted by nilsW View Post
Hi all,

I have been following this thread with great interest. It is great to see so many people with a keen interest in these old record players!

The thread inspired me to bring down my old SP-10 from the attic where it has been sitting for at least 5 years. I now want to get it up and running.

I thought I would spend an hour to clean the bearing and to get some new oil into it, and then start to play some music.

But unfortunately I discovered that the plastic thing on top of the bearing is worn down to such degree that the bare metal of the bearing shaft top is just visible

Is there anyone who has advice how to replace the worn cap (thrust plate?), and what material to use?

Nils
Hi Nils.
Can you take a photo that will give us a view of what you mean and post that to this thread?

-Steve
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Old 6th October 2013, 11:41 AM   #170
nilsW is offline nilsW  Sweden
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Hi

I made som photos of bearing shaft.

First picture shows shaft with cap. You can see how the cap has been worn through so the metal is actually showing:

http://i754.photobucket.com/albums/xx190/Myter01/2013-10-06b003_zps93a8bd16.jpg

The cap has overall approx dimensions: 2,6 mm thick and 6,7 mm wide. Not a pretty sight, the cap is worn right through!

The bare metal shaft looks like this:

http://i754.photobucket.com/albums/x...ps2bc8f612.jpg

As you can see that there is even a mark on tip of the bearing!

I would like to get a replacement cap, and I would like to open up discussion on what material to use when making a replacement.(I scanned the internet and there seems to be no replacements readily available)

There is an old thread on Audiokarma Bearing wear on an SP 10 mk II PICS - AudioKarma.org Home Audio Stereo Discussion Forums on this topic.

There is some interesting stuff in the thread but nothing conclusive. "Self repairing plastic" is mentioned, but conclusion seem to be that that was just marketing. Perhaps it is teflon or delrin?

Anyway, what would be a good material to make a new cap?

Regards
Nils

Last edited by nilsW; 6th October 2013 at 12:03 PM.
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