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Old 16th November 2010, 11:32 AM   #21
DF96 is online now DF96  England
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No, just my general understanding. I thought it was only 78s which had fillers? Record vinyl has plasticisers, which are softer than the vinyl itself? It is the softness of the vinyl which is part of the problem, as dust particles can get stuck into the groove walls and normal brushing may not dislodge them.
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Old 16th November 2010, 11:38 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joachim Gerhard View Post
I think it is not the vinyl but the dust and dirt that grinds the diamond. That is the reson i keep my records clean and wash them regulary. I clean my stylus each time i play a recor
and apply some Lyra SPT. Nevertheless i send my cartridge for service each ca. 3 years.
I play around 1 to 2 hours music each day over vinyl.
It is years ago but i have seen microscopic pictures that show diamond wear over time.
quote-- from audioimport.nl

The stylus bears on the groove wall with a pressure of from 40,000 to 70,000 pounds per square inch. The stylus is "Flying" along the length of the groove at 20 inches per second. The force on the groove wall is so great that there is an enormous pressure wave moving out into the body of the plastic as the record moves around the stylus tip. The groove wall is pushing and shoving the stylus tip around. The force needed by the wall to accelerate and move the stylus is added to the already huge pressure exerted by the stylus at rest. The combination of forces creates a varying amplitude pressure wave that under critical conditions becomes a shock wave that hammers its way through the vinyl material. The energy in such a shock wave can exceed the bonding forces which link and hold the vinyl together.
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Old 16th November 2010, 11:38 AM   #23
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Vinyl for LPs is highly filled- pure PVC is white.
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Old 16th November 2010, 12:37 PM   #24
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OK, the filler is carbon (I have just discovered). I guess most of this will be soft graphite, but there may be small amounts of other forms.
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Old 16th November 2010, 01:36 PM   #25
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No, generally it's carbon black- that doesn't have the lubricity of graphite, but it does a better job of coloring and modifying the mechanical properties of the vinyl. Generally a low structure factor black.

The fact that there are a tiny proportion of CNTs contained in blacks will no doubt start speculation on mysterious factors affecting the sound quality of vinyl...
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Old 16th November 2010, 01:39 PM   #26
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BTW, since we're talking about one of my favorite subjects , the level of plasticizers in LP compounts is quite low. And they aren't just PVC, there's PVA in there as well.
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Old 16th November 2010, 01:57 PM   #27
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The proportion of C60 and other buckyball variants in the carbon must have an effect on sound quality? There must be a few nanotubes in there as well.
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Old 16th November 2010, 02:06 PM   #28
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Precisely. The content of CNTs and buckyballs affects the electron tunneling properties, causing variable percolation thresholds. This explains the increased smoothness and freedom from digitization nasties that will always separate fine vinyl from digital media for the truly sensitive music lover.
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Old 16th November 2010, 03:07 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chopchip View Post
what are some of the symptoms of a defective cartridge? i have an old m91ed and i get a lot of crackling when the volume of the music increases in particular at high frequencies i think. when a violin plays a high note and at a loud volume a crackling becomes very prominent. does this have to do with the cartridge?


thanks
Over time, a lot of crap can build up on the inside of the cartridge motor which can cause the problem you are hearing. Can you remove the stylus and make sure that it is absolutely clean inside? This sounds like a tracking problem, and since this is a Shure MM, there is either something physically hampering the mechanism or the cartridge set-up is in gross error.


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John

Last edited by jlsem; 16th November 2010 at 03:19 PM.
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Old 16th November 2010, 05:15 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by jlsem View Post
Over time, a lot of crap can build up on the inside of the cartridge motor which can cause the problem you are hearing. Can you remove the stylus and make sure that it is absolutely clean inside? This sounds like a tracking problem, and since this is a Shure MM, there is either something physically hampering the mechanism or the cartridge set-up is in gross error.
John
is it possible to open up the cartridge and clean it out? can i use some deoxit type spray to clean it?
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