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Old 24th January 2013, 12:55 PM   #71
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3 wire, looks like an AC, 2 phase synchronous. Fire them up with 2x 20v AC with one phase running through 0.22uf of capacitor and see if they turn. Older motors are very unlikely to be low voltage, especially when as heavily built as they are. Looks like they have two matched and one odd colour wire, one would assume the matched pair are the input for each phase and the other the return.
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Old 24th January 2013, 02:32 PM   #72
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Just wondering -- is the step size in the 3-phase controller chips coming out of places like Texas Instruments and Fairchild Semiconductor sufficiently small for a TT
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Old 28th January 2013, 06:48 PM   #73
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Default two phase?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sq225917 View Post
3 wire, looks like an AC, 2 phase synchronous. Fire them up with 2x 20v AC with one phase running through 0.22uf of capacitor and see if they turn. Older motors are very unlikely to be low voltage, especially when as heavily built as they are. Looks like they have two matched and one odd colour wire, one would assume the matched pair are the input for each phase and the other the return.
...in Canada we have either single phase or three phase...I am an Electrician but only know some things about electronics...two phase as you say would mean ac voltage applied from two circuits 90 degrees out of phase with one wire for return...house service is nearly always 240v three wire circuit (two hots one neutral)...one hot to neutral is 120v witch is a regular plug in a house...to get 20v two phase sounds a bit tricky from that...maybe a special transformer I have not yet seen??...Any suggestions? I'll also mention the three wires coming from these motors are all different colors...was also wondering if there is a simple test to identify motor type with a ohm meter?

Last edited by Stuartarm; 28th January 2013 at 06:57 PM.
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Old 28th January 2013, 09:14 PM   #74
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Stuart, it's the same in the UK, single phase and 3-phase. Referring to the motor as two phase just means the two inputs are separated by 90 degrees by adding a small capacitor to one of the inputs.

Just find a 20v transformer, split the output into two wires and pass one of them through a capacitor of 0.22uf. (.22uf is just a nominal value you might find you need anything upto a couple of uf to get the correct lag)

You can't really identify the motor with a multi-meter, measurement of winding resistance doesn't tell you much. You could of course connect the outputs to your multimeter and spin the drive shaft quickly to see what comes out AC/DC?
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Old 28th January 2013, 11:05 PM   #75
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Thanks sq...if you don't mind me picking your brain a bit more with a few more questions...how will I know when I get the correct lag without the use of an oscilloscope...also was wondering if you know anything about speed control for this type of motor?
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Old 29th January 2013, 08:27 AM   #76
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Has anyone considered steam power?
crazy

NAS use underpower (volt ?) AC motor that need a hand spin to start....
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Old 29th January 2013, 05:46 PM   #77
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Stuart, if you hold the spinning motor in your hand you will easily be able to feel the difference between different lag amounts between the two phases. I can feel the difference between 0.22 and 0.2uf on my LP12 motor quite easily.

Let's find out what voltage your motor needs first, then we can talk power supplies. Different versions are better for different requirements, you also need to consider the tolerance/drag of your turntable bearing and platter load.

If you motor need under 60v then I can wholeheartedly recommend this Roehren-und-Hoeren :: Thema anzeigen - Luxusnetzteil für Synchronmotoren mal anders It was no use for my needs, 120v but it genuinely is the most accurate and adjustable AC controller you can DIY.
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Old 29th January 2013, 09:07 PM   #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Number13 View Post
Has anyone considered steam power?
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicoch58 View Post
crazy

NAS use underpower (volt ?) AC motor that need a hand spin to start....
I could have sworn that link was going to be a RickRoll.

Reminds me of a Monty Python skit: "Try the wow, flutter, bacon, egg and wow and flutter. That hasn't got much wow and flutter in it."
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Old 21st February 2013, 08:05 AM   #79
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.



I just happened to have two identical ones but I have also used several turntables with speed adjustment such as the PL-570. Basically, any turntable with flat rim platter and speed adjustment will work. Models to recommend are Technics SL-M3, JVC QL-F6, Pioneer PL-570 & PL-550, etc... Or you can always add a plate on top of another turntable acting as a pulley, in this case the ubiquitous Technics SL-1200Mk2 will work great as a turntable "motor-pod." Get one at second hand price and it will beat most fancy motor-pods costing an arm and a leg. And it will make you pay attention to motor quality and realize all this attention to fancy shiny blig bling thick platters is misguided. Get the source of rotation, the motor, right and with quality, the sound will benefit. The two turntable approach saves me the trouble and money to find a high speed motor with proper speed control electronics - too much hassle for me. I am quite satisfied with the result.

In this picture, I put a Technics SL-1400Mk2 with a broken tonearm to goo use. I added flat rim platter, a salvaged part, on top of the Technics platter acting as a pulley. You can even add an idler wheel in between the two turntables. The passive platter is from an Empire 208 belt-drive turntable.
Click the image to open in full size.
I have similar idea without belt...got two flywheel motors without removable pully just flat surface but got an idea to use with sub platter and rubber bushing around sub platter.. motors being 120 degrees apart from sub and main platter driven by sub platter direct...i will keep u posted and got a Philips sub and bearing for less than 30 bucks delivered...alot of work to do yet
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Old 24th February 2013, 11:31 PM   #80
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Just read through this entire thread & I have a request. Can someone please post a simple diagram/schematic of an ac synchronous motor arrangement using an amp & sine wave? This is for someone quite willing to blow himself up in the search for speed stability I think I understand most of how it works but want to make sure. Thanks all. Pretty new to this forum & love it.
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