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Restoring and Improving A Thorens TD-124 MKII
Restoring and Improving A Thorens TD-124 MKII
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Old 12th June 2018, 07:30 PM   #2621
Dilbert is offline Dilbert  Canada
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I haven’t found any need to talc the new belt. So far so good. Now I’m thinking about ordering the Hanze spring kit for mounting the motor. It’s 39 Euros! Kevin, do you still recommend replacing the rubber grommets?

I saw an impressive video showing a dramatic reduction in noise level with the springs on the Hanze site.

Last edited by Dilbert; 12th June 2018 at 07:36 PM.
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Old 12th June 2018, 07:56 PM   #2622
kevinkr is offline kevinkr  United States
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Restoring and Improving A Thorens TD-124 MKII
Yes, I still recommend the spring upgrade, the table was noticeably quieter afterwards using a mechanics stethoscope, and this was upgrading from the geltec bushings I had previously installed.
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Old 13th June 2018, 09:26 AM   #2623
nigel pearson is offline nigel pearson  United Kingdom
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If you don't have a stethoscope often a long srew driver to the back of the ear works ( or front ). A slotted screw near the thing of interest can be a reference point. Try it with PU arms at the base. It can be surprising how good the arm sounds via speakers despite what the screwdriver tells you. Top class arms often have very nice screwdriver sound. A Dual CS505 surprised me. The arm that looks so good fails this test. This might say why although good the CS505 is not great. It's too easy to say what you see in this game. Works for cars also.
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Old 16th June 2018, 02:29 PM   #2624
mbergerooo is offline mbergerooo  Canada
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Default Bent chassis under armboard.

The part of the chassis that supports the armboard is bent. Has anybody here encountered this? Can i bend it back? I am beginning to think that Thorens changed the chassis slightly because this was a problem with the early td124.
I was thinking of clamping the TT down to a very flat surface and then drawing the bent part back down with bolts and padded hardwood. Adjusting the bolts slowly. Is this a crazy idea?
m
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Old 16th June 2018, 04:18 PM   #2625
user510 is online now user510
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbergerooo View Post
The part of the chassis that supports the armboard is bent. Has anybody here encountered this? Can i bend it back? I am beginning to think that Thorens changed the chassis slightly because this was a problem with the early td124.
I was thinking of clamping the TT down to a very flat surface and then drawing the bent part back down with bolts and padded hardwood. Adjusting the bolts slowly. Is this a crazy idea?
m
2078 chassis

It is not uncommon to see early models bent in the viscinity of the armboard support. There was a revision which adds some structural reinforcements to this area to prevent such damage. A weakness of the early design, which the factory corrected.

See above link to one of the bent chassis that I corrected. It is not difficult but must be approached with care. With a completely disassembled chassis make use of flat surfaces to press the chassis flat again. Take care not to make it worse, or -- worse even, crack the chassis in this process.

-Steve
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Old 16th June 2018, 09:19 PM   #2626
mbergerooo is offline mbergerooo  Canada
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Hi user510,
How did you manage to bend that back? Clamped it down to a solid flat surface and then slowly use more clamps to push down the armboard portion?
m
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Old Yesterday, 12:14 AM   #2627
kevinkr is offline kevinkr  United States
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Restoring and Improving A Thorens TD-124 MKII
What you propose to do sounds like the right approach, just do it slowly. I have never had to do it even on very early ones, so hopefully Steve will weigh in with something a bit more explicit.
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Old Yesterday, 12:25 AM   #2628
user510 is online now user510
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbergerooo View Post
Hi user510,
How did you manage to bend that back? Clamped it down to a solid flat surface and then slowly use more clamps to push down the armboard portion?
m
That sounds like the appropriate first try. It likely helps to warm up the chassis with a heat gun if you have one. Don't get it hot enough to affect the paint, you just want the metal from being cold. Room temp is likely enough if you're in the house. A bit warmer will help.

If this proves not to be enough you can try placing a long round steel rod directly under the pivot point and very gingerly clamp down on the extremeties in very small increments. Make sure you don't go too far.

The rod should be longer than the chassis width to be certain that the bend is uniformly made.

Caution.
Fwiw I've had to do this on two of the early chassis I've worked on. The aluminum chassis is soft and bends easily. Keep forces low and your eyes on the prize, so to speak.

-Steve
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Old Yesterday, 02:24 PM   #2629
mbergerooo is offline mbergerooo  Canada
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Thanks kevinkr and user510. I think I will keep clamping pressure across the armboard portion right up to the pivot point. That will eliminate any chance of leverage stressing the chassis. The worst part is approx. 3/16ths out of level but I think that slow clamping pressure over time will do it. I will post an update once I make the attempt.
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Old Yesterday, 10:25 PM   #2630
Dilbert is offline Dilbert  Canada
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Please let us know how it works out. Iím still gobsmacked about how this thing sounds. I have the Hanze spring kit on order.
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