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aguantesoda 7th July 2010 07:26 AM

Need help choosing a turntable
 
Hello! I want to buy a turntable only for home use, but I donīt know nothing about it. My friend have recommended me a Lenco l-75 with Shure M44C , but I donīt know how it sounds.

Can you help me ?

Shaun 7th July 2010 08:16 AM

Good turntable, good cartridge. But the Lenco's arm has rubber/plastic V-blocks that tend to deteriorate with age. Check these out. I think that there are replacements available for them, likely of better material.

rrrremus 7th July 2010 01:32 PM

Hello. I have the same problem. I do not want to spend 600 Euros on a Technics since i will only use it for home listening.
I saw something very cheap made by Omnitronic. Are these any good from a mechanical point of view? Since i can redo electronics if needed.
I do not mind if they are belt driven or direct and i need the strobe function.

aguantesoda 8th July 2010 03:23 AM

I read that the Technics SL 1200 is a great turtable, but "the disc will deteriorate further". It is true? compared to Lenco l - 75, is best or worst?

I really like to know which parameters should have a turntable; like cartridge type, or antiskating system, drive mechanism...

moray james 8th July 2010 05:58 AM

sounds to me that you have a good friend who knows what he is talking about. Why don't you take his advice and start there. With a Lenco you are well up on the curve. You could also do well with a Thorens or Dual for not a lot of money. Stick with your friends advice and start learning and listening. That will teach you what you need to know to evaluate other tables arms and cartridges. Every person here will have a different opinion and different advice. You could get lost in it all. Having a friend to help you along as you go will be a great asset.

Shaun 8th July 2010 06:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aguantesoda (Post 2237836)
"the disc will deteriorate further"

Any idea what was meant by this? I can't see a reason why this should be the case.

aguantesoda 8th July 2010 11:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by moray james (Post 2237910)
sounds to me that you have a good friend who knows what he is talking about. Why don't you take his advice and start there. With a Lenco you are well up on the curve. You could also do well with a Thorens or Dual for not a lot of money. Stick with your friends advice and start learning and listening. That will teach you what you need to know to evaluate other tables arms and cartridges. Every person here will have a different opinion and different advice. You could get lost in it all. Having a friend to help you along as you go will be a great asset.

Thank you Moray; yes you are right, maybe I need to hear the different turntables to get the difference between all. My friend recommended me the Lenco L-75 because that's what he has in his house, but only for that reason.

sreten 9th July 2010 12:29 AM

Hi All,

A stock Lenco L-75 is not a good sounding turntable, though with a different
arm and a replacement massive plinth and ditching the stock suspension it
can be made to sound pretty good.

I am aware newbies are pretty clueless, FWIW Shure cartridges are also
not very good, so unless the combination is dirt cheap, I would avoid it.

Having said that the world is your oyster when it comes to a used turntable.
For a first turntable spend a small amount on something extremely high value.

Some of the Dual models are worth checking out, they do go cheap.

For Japanese you need to do your research, I like the Trio/Kenwood KD2055.

Spending more there are lots of options but you need to know your turntables.

checkout Vinyl Engine | The Home of the Turntable

Also budget for a new genuine stylus or new cartridge.

/Sreten.

aguantesoda 9th July 2010 05:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sreten (Post 2238624)
Hi All,

A stock Lenco L-75 is not a good sounding turntable, though with a different
arm and a replacement massive plinth and ditching the stock suspension it
can be made to sound pretty good.

I am aware newbies are pretty clueless, FWIW Shure cartridges are also
not very good, so unless the combination is dirt cheap, I would avoid it.

Having said that the world is your oyster when it comes to a used turntable.
For a first turntable spend a small amount on something extremely high value.

Some of the Dual models are worth checking out, they do go cheap.

For Japanese you need to do your research, I like the Trio/Kenwood KD2055.

Spending more there are lots of options but you need to know your turntables.

checkout Vinyl Engine | The Home of the Turntable

Also budget for a new genuine stylus or new cartridge.

/Sreten.

Thanks Sreten, I will see that page.

The Technics Sl 1200, sounds better? What about the lenco B-52 ?
How about the Stanton 500 or the Pickering XV15 ? This fit well in the Lenco L-75. Anyway, if I need to search a cartridge, or a stylus, what parameters I need to know?

sreten 11th July 2010 06:23 PM

Hi,

I'd recommend a Technics with the seperate subchassis, I do not know
the cartridges you mentioned, the Stanton 500 EE mkII, (and that model
only) is apparently pretty good.

But there are loads of choices, value is how good it is versus the price.

The B52 is nice if you like retro but a good one in full restored working
order is not going to be cheap, for the price you likely can do better
with more modern stuff, (unrestored but needing minor servicing).

/Sreten.


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