diyAudio

diyAudio (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/)
-   Analogue Source (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/analogue-source/)
-   -   Custom made turntable plinth... (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/analogue-source/163869-custom-made-turntable-plinth.html)

binspaul 26th March 2010 05:17 AM

Custom made turntable plinth...
 
Hi,

I am planning to build a new plinth for my turntable. I would like to know the best medium for the plinth.

>> Wood.
>> MDF.
>> Granite.
>> Combination.

Please comment...

Best regards,
Bins.

Nanook 26th March 2010 05:57 AM

wood.no comment needed. everything else sux

binspaul 26th March 2010 09:34 AM

Hi Stew,

I am planning to build a plinth which is composed of multiple layers of wood with a solid granite base. Something pretty similar to: dps turntable, der plattenspieler, dps 2, dps 3, Schroder No. 2 fw - Soundscape HiFi And Music


Best regards,
Bins.

Nanook 26th March 2010 08:55 PM

bins, problem is the grnite I think. Anything denser than the platter can cause reflections back into the platter, and hence the stylus tip. The granite must be isolated from the platter as much as possible.

take care. PM me or email direct if we're the only two posting....

BillEpstein 28th March 2010 02:35 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Here's another vote for wood. VPI quit making acrylic HW-19 super armboards so when I switched away from the SME it was drilled for, I had to make my own.

Walnut was at hand and I like how all 3 of my arms sound on it. One day I might try other woods just to see but I keep getting older and more complacent:cheerful:

AVWERK 28th March 2010 09:50 PM

Wood (solid) has high Q problems so it's hardly used in speakers for example.

MDF solves the above and is for all intended purposes non contributary.

If you must use something from your list, glue layers of each one together so each one doesn,t ring and add something that shouldn,t br there.

Better yet use thick acrylic and steel or brass glued together

Regards
David

analog_sa 28th March 2010 10:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AVWERK (Post 2134692)
MDF solves the above and is for all intended purposes non contributary.



Maybe under very specific conditions this is true. Ever tried comparing an MDF rack shelf against other materials? Not so great.

AuroraB 28th March 2010 11:32 PM

This might be interesting....

Solid wood for loudspeakers are not mainly for the high Q, rather for troublesome crossgrain joints, that might crack with varying humudity.....otherwise a lot of ppl would love to use real wood for cab's. Resonances can be fought in various ways......

On topic, though, - hardwoods do have a fairly high Q, and some ppl dampen it with leadshot channels. Some say that an MDF base kills tone....
Butcherblock design might lower some of the Q, - how about a layered base with thin lead sheets in between? Do we really want dampening?

binspaul 29th March 2010 05:15 AM

Hi,

1. What about the idea of using several layers of wood with some thin layer of acrylic/something similar between them so that they will help to damp the vibrations ?

2. Which is the best material for making the isolation feet ?

Best regards,
Bins.

planet10 29th March 2010 05:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AVWERK (Post 2134692)
Wood (solid) has high Q problems so it's hardly used in speakers for example.

MDF solves the above and is for all intended purposes non contributary.

No resonances in a loudspeaker is a good goal, but not practically achieivable.. if you do have a resonance, a hi Q one is preferable to a low Q one... and as Aurora points out the reason solid wood is not often used is because of the huge callenges involved in keeping it solid.

dave


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:41 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio


Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2