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Old 19th February 2011, 04:05 PM   #191
TURBINE is offline TURBINE  Canada
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I use distilled water that i make myself, it is just single distilled but if you can get triple distilled even better. I then mix in 2 ounces of Audio Intelligent # 2 step cleaning fluid ,which is a very pure alcohol solution into the 1 gallon of water.
I have found the most important part is to ensure you completely remove all the cleaning solution from the LP before it dries or you will have noise left behind.
If you want to try this just ultrasonic clean the album and then allow it to dry , now play it and see how noisy it is , then re-clean and vacuum it and you will notice the difference . Using triple distilled water would probably help cause it will leave less deposits behind. You will be amazed at how much crud you get off the lp even though you think it is clean. The more albums you clean using the same water the more important it is the vacuum of the cleaning fluid cause it becomes dirtier every time an album is cleaned.
Todd
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Old 27th February 2011, 06:38 PM   #192
hifiZen is offline hifiZen  Canada
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I'm on the verge of putting together a system like what Turbine uses... Ultrasonics for the bulk cleaning & loosening / solubilizing contaminants, followed by a Percy Williams (Loricraft, Keith Monks) vacuum for drying. My theory on the latter is that the high air velocities around the small nozzle are more effective at pulling all of the cleaning fluid and dissolved / floating filth out of the groove compared to other drying techniques. As I start getting my drying machine together, I'll post to a thread on that subject.

But returning to the subject of this thread, I am still a bit nervous about using ultrasonics and the potential for damage. This seems to have been tested fairly well by some, but I recall reading here somewhere about pitting / ultrasonics causing bubbles moulded into the record surface to rupture, causing cavities which can take out your stylus. I really, really, don't want that to happen!!!

One of the key things I've learned reading about ultrasonics, is that the frequency matters. Higher frequency creates smaller bubbles which implode with less energy, and are therefore gentler on surfaces, but are also more effective on smaller particles.

It seems the majority of cleaning tanks on eBay are 40kHz units, though I see one which operates at 55kHz. What frequency are people using? Any problems with damage?

Is the pitting risk just urban legend? Would love to hear from people about their experiences with USC.
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Last edited by hifiZen; 27th February 2011 at 06:47 PM.
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Old 14th March 2011, 08:08 AM   #193
wixy is offline wixy  Australia
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Just wondering what the ideal motor rpm is?

I was thinking of using the 0.45rpm motor here: http://www.servocity.com/html/dayton...ors__12v_.html

But would it be too slow?
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Old 21st March 2011, 02:58 PM   #194
TURBINE is offline TURBINE  Canada
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I have heard of pits appearing during cleaning that have ruined a stylus but have had no issues so far.
My Eumax 6.5 L ultrasonic cleaner runs at 42KHZ.

For rotating the record during cleaning i use an old radio control servo that has been rewired to run continuous with a 10 ohm pot to control the speed. I have found about 1 rpm is good this allows the water to drain off the album and not run over the label. Once the record has been cleaned for a while the water follows the grooves around and drips off the bottom .

The Dayton gear motor would work great , i would recommend going with the model up for a little more speed maybe the 1.5 rpm or 3.4 rpm. The motor can always be slowed down but once it is running at full speed it can't go any faster. Not a lot of torque is required to rotate the album . These rpm's are rated at 12 v and can be reduced with a pot or resistor.

A .5 amp walwart would be more than enough to power this unit.

Todd
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Old 4th April 2011, 06:43 AM   #195
hifiZen is offline hifiZen  Canada
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Thanks Turbine, good to know. The more I search, it seems the less I can find about this supposed pitting problem (!?!).

Anyway, the R/C servo is a good idea - I've got a bunch of old ones which should do nicely. Previously, I was considering the Tamiya planetary gear motor kit. That might still be a good option for someone.

Also in the meantime I've picked up an inexpensive linear-tracking turntable and a KNF vacuum pump to use as the basis for my drying machine. The turntable is computerized, so I'll have to figure out how to trick the CPU into doing the arm movements I want, but I have the service manual and it looks do-able.

More later...
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Old 4th April 2011, 07:11 PM   #196
benb is offline benb  United States
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Mention of the alleged pitting problem brings up another question for me. As I look back over the pictures in the first 50 or so posts, I see perhaps a dozen LP's in the tank, separated by perhaps 1/2 to 1/4 inch. Does the ultrasonic sound pass through the water and into the area between LP's as well as it does to the two outside LP surfaces? I'm wondering about the volume level of the ultrasound and whether it's at the same level between the LP's as in other areas of the water, and whether it cleans as effectively on all the surfaces.

I don't (yet) have an ultrasonic tank, but I'm rather anal retentive with my vacuum RCM when playing an LP I haven't cleaned before (I generally record to computer while playing and use the computer file for later playback, and so rarely play a physical LP more than once). I clean only one side of an LP and then play it, then clean the other side and play it. I do with with the assumption that the turntable mat may have dust that is picked up by the LP, and I might as well wait to clean that side until I'm ready to play it rather than have it perfectly clean, then pick up some dust from the mat. With this or a similar system that cleans both sides, I'd feel the need to vacuum off the turntable mat before putting a clean LP on it that I intend to play the bottom side.

Last edited by benb; 4th April 2011 at 07:18 PM.
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Old 5th April 2011, 03:16 PM   #197
konga is offline konga  United States
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I'm about to embark on a completely DIY ultrasonic cleaner. I have purchase a couple of ultrasonic inductors on ebay. I'm looking to hook them up to an amp and generate the signal wave from a laptop soundcard.

The inductors are rated at 55w, I want to generate a 40-45khz signal. Does anyone know of a good cheap amplifier that can handle ultrasonic frequencies maybe up to 50kHz? I believe I'll need something that produce 55w RMS. Someone recommended a Pyle Pro PT-2000, I'm looking to spend as little as possible.

At some point I'd like to replace the laptop with something that can generate a 40-50khz tone. Any pointers on constructing something like this?
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Old 24th May 2011, 02:41 PM   #198
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As that eumax ultrasound cleaner can have 10 or more records in it at a time, how many sets of records do you wash before you change the washing fluid?
This interests me as if I need to fill the machine with 4-5 liters of clean water+etanol etc. it'll get somewhat expensive to be changing the fluids every two or three sets.
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Old 18th June 2011, 07:15 PM   #199
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And answering to myself, the eumax cleaner heats the water inside to 40 degrees celsius in 1,5hours which means I can wash three sets of records before changing fluids. But as I'm using plain tap water with a dash of etanol costs stay low.
It seems that my expectations on the efficiency of this cleaning method were too great. There are some sticky mold-like stuff and grease spots that just won't come off even after multiple washes, yes, I have a lot of second hand vinyl.
I kind of thought that this would explode everything off the vinyl surface.
Basic dirt comes off fine, and records do actually sound clean, even if the record has ticks and pops the overall feeling is of a clean detailed sound. This is a good solution for efficient mass-cleaning of your record collection and overall I'm very happy with the results.
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Old 18th June 2011, 08:44 PM   #200
GoranB is offline GoranB  Poland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by konga View Post
I'm about to embark on a completely DIY ultrasonic cleaner. I have purchase a couple of ultrasonic inductors on ebay. I'm looking to hook them up to an amp and generate the signal wave from a laptop soundcard.

The inductors are rated at 55w, I want to generate a 40-45khz signal. Does anyone know of a good cheap amplifier that can handle ultrasonic frequencies maybe up to 50kHz? I believe I'll need something that produce 55w RMS. Someone recommended a Pyle Pro PT-2000, I'm looking to spend as little as possible.

At some point I'd like to replace the laptop with something that can generate a 40-50khz tone. Any pointers on constructing something like this?
I dont think your laptop sound card can proceede 40-45 KHz, for that purpose you should build an oscillator, there are a lot circuits with NE555 on net. Its very important what is the resonant frequency of the transducers you want to use.
Abt amp, i think any hi-fi amplifier can be good for that purpose, just if you want to use 2 transducers, you will need an amp of 110W minimum.
The cheapest aproach would be to build an amplifier based on some TDA. It could be 2 x TDA2030 in bridge mode per transducer.
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